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  1. Creating resilient and sociable domestic pets

    Contributor(s):: Hargrave, C.

    2021CompanionOctober18-232041-2487EnglishASAB, London, UK.text

  2. To pet or to enrich? Increasing dogs' welfare in veterinary clinics/shelters: a pilot study

    Contributor(s):: Lopes, J. V. S. R., Daud, N. M., Young, R. J., Azevedo, C. S. de

  3. Dogs and wolves differ in their response allocation to their owner/caregiver or food in a concurrent choice procedure

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Isernia, L., Wynne, C. D. L., House, L., Feuerbacher, E. N.

     Dogs and wolves both show attachment-like behaviors to their owners/caregivers, including exploring more in the presence of the owner/caregiver, and greeting the owner/caregiver more effusively after an absence. Concurrent choice studies can elucidate dogs’ and wolves’...

  4. Selection for reduced fear of humans changes intra-specific social behavior in red junglefowl - implications for chicken domestication

    | Contributor(s):: Gjoen, J., Jensen, P.

  5. Are multi-cat homes more stressful? A critical review of the evidence associated with cat group size and wellbeing

    | Contributor(s):: Finka, L. R., Foreman-Worsley, R.

  6. The mechanics of social interactions between cats and their owners

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Turner, D. C.

    This is a mini review that summarizes what is known from quantitative observational studies of social interactions between domestic cats and humans in both laboratory colonies and the home setting. Only results from data that have been statistically analyzed are included; hypotheses still to be...

  7. Beyond puppy selection-considering the role of puppy raisers in bringing out the best in assistance dog puppies

    | Contributor(s):: Mai, D. L., Howell, T., Benton, P., Bennett, P. C.

    Problem behaviors are the most common reason to reject young dogs from entering advanced training and obtaining certification for work as an assistance dog. Therefore, working toward preventing undesirable behaviors should be prioritized to reduce failure rates. The development of problem...

  8. Coexistence of diversified dog socialities and territorialities in the city of Concepcion, Chile

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Miternique, H. C., Gaunet, F.

    There has been scant research on the presence of stray dogs in cities. Studying their very considerable presence in Concepción (Chile) provided a unique opportunity to learn more about the different patterns of sociality and territoriality exhibited by the dog species. Via a set of case...

  9. The effect of demonstrator social rank on the attentiveness and motivation of pigs to positively interact with their human caretakers

    | Contributor(s):: Luna, D., Gonzalez, C., Byrd, C. J., Palomo, R., Huenul, E., Figueroa, J.

  10. The Days and Nights of Zoo Elephants: Using Epidemiology to Better Understand Stereotypic Behavior of African Elephants (Loxodonta africana) and Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) in North American Zoos

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Brian J. Greco, Cheryl L. Meehan, Jen N. Hogan, Katherine A. Leighty, Jill Mellen, Georgia J. Mason, Joy A. Mench

    Stereotypic behavior is an important indicator of compromised welfare. Zoo elephants are documented to perform stereotypic behavior, but the factors that contribute to performance have not been systematically assessed. We collected behavioral data on 89 elephants (47 African [Loxodonta...

  11. Cortisol levels in dolphin Tursiops truncatus interactive programs linked to humanNiveles de cortisol en delfines Tursiops truncatus vinculados a programas interactivos con humanos

    | Contributor(s):: Sanchez Okrucky, R., Morales Vela, B.

    Understanding the physiological changes in animals during physical activity to improve animal welfare has become increasingly important in animal collections that remain under human care. To date, the effect of interactive programs on dolphins under human care has not been evaluated, for that...

  12. Cognition and learning in horses (Equus caballus): what we know and why we should ask more

    | Contributor(s):: Brubaker, L., Udell, M. A. R.

    Horses (Equus caballus) have a rich history in their relationship with humans. Across different cultures and eras they have been utilized for work, show, cultural rituals, consumption, therapy, and companionship and continue to serve in many of these roles today. As one of the most commonly...

  13. Ontogenetic effects on gazing behaviour: a case study of kennel dogs (Labrador Retrievers) in the impossible task paradigm

    | Contributor(s):: D'Aniello, B., Scandurra, A.

    Life experiences and living conditions can influence the problem-solving strategies and the communicative abilities of dogs with humans. The goals of this study were to determine any behavioural differences between Labrador Retrievers living in a kennel and those living in a house as pets and to...

  14. Does group size have an impact on welfare indicators in fattening pigs?

    | Contributor(s):: Meyer-Hamme, S. E. K., Lambertz, C., Gauly, M.

    Production systems for fattening pigs have been characterized over the last 2 decades by rising farm sizes coupled with increasing group sizes. These developments resulted in a serious public discussion regarding animal welfare and health in these intensive production systems. Even though large...

  15. Silvopastoral systems for sustainable animal production and the role of animal welfare

    | Contributor(s):: Broom, D.

  16. Social behavior of domestic dogs and cats as compared to wild canine and feline species : an honors thesis

    | Contributor(s):: Anthony W. Rusk

    With the help of animal behavioralists, parallels have been drawn between domestic dogs and cats and their wild cousins. In some respects, social behavior in domestic animals has remained similar to characteristics found in wild animals. General observations of social conduct have been examined....

  17. Do domestic dogs recognize emotional incongruence in human faces and voices?

    | Contributor(s):: Allison Hagley

    Dogs have had a close relationship with humans for more than 10,000 years, but the effects of artificial selection on canine cognition are only recently being studied. Studies have confirmed the beliefs of pet owners – dogs recognize human faces and voices – and that dogs are...

  18. Social networks and welfare in future animal management

    | Contributor(s):: Koene, P., Ipema, B.

    It may become advantageous to keep human-managed animals in the social network groups to which they have adapted. Data concerning the social networks of farm animal species and their ancestors are scarce but essential to establishing the importance of a natural social network for farmed animal...

  19. An exploration of an Equine-Facilitated Learning intervention with young offenders

    | Contributor(s):: Hemingway, A., Meek, R., Hill, C. E.

    This research reports a qualitative study to explore the behavioral responses and reflections from Young Offenders undertaking an Equine-Facilitated Learning (EFL) Intervention in prison in the United Kingdom. Learning was facilitated by an instructor, and the participants were taught...

  20. Social support does not require attachment: any conspecific tranquilizes isolated guinea-pig pups

    | Contributor(s):: Tokumaru, R. S., Ades, C., Monticelli, P. F.

    Guinea pig pups produce typical distress whistles when isolated. Whistles' frequency is decreased or abolished when they contact with the mother and, to a lesser degree, a sibling or even an unfamiliar female, is regained. Those non-aggressive companions were considered social support providers...