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  1. Owning a dog and working: a telephone survey of dog owners and employers in Sweden

    Contributor(s):: Norling, A. Y., Keeling, L.

    Many dog owners are faced with the problem of what to do with their dog when they go to work. Different solutions to the problem may affect dogs, owners, and employers. In this study, 204 working, Swedish dog owners and 90 employers were interviewed by telephone regarding practical issues and...

  2. A case study: fecal corticosteroid and behavior as indicators of welfare during relocation of an Asian elephant

    Contributor(s):: Laws, N., Ganswindt, A., Heistermann, M., Harris, M., Harris, S., Sherwin, C.

    This study was a preliminary investigation of an enzyme immunoassay for measuring fecal glucocorticoid metabolites in a male Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) by investigating changes in behavior and cortisol metabolite excretion associated with a putative stressful event. The study collected...

  3. A combination of behavioral and physiological indicators for assessing pig welfare on the farm

    Contributor(s):: Candiani, D., Salamano, G., Mellia, E., Doglione, L., Bruno, R., Toussaint, M., Gruys, E.

    The purpose of this research was to identify pig welfare indicators that could help in recognizing stressful practices on farm. The study evaluated behavioral and physiological indicators (cortisol and negative acute phase proteins) in 2 groups of 20 female pigs 4 months old after a 48-hr...

  4. A multidisciplinary approach to assess the welfare of weaned pigs during transport at three space allowances

    Contributor(s):: Sutherland, M. A., Bryer, P. J., Davis, B. L., McGlone, J. J.

    Transport can be a stressful experience for pigs, especially in pigs simultaneously experiencing weaning stress. The objective of this study was to use a multidisciplinary approach to assess the welfare of weaned pigs during transport at 3 space allowances. A commercial semitrailer, fitted with...

  5. A nonnatural head-neck position ( Rollkur ) during training results in less acute stress in elite, trained, dressage horses

    Contributor(s):: Breda, E. van

    This study measured parameters of stress in recreational, trained horses (REC; n=7) and elite (International Grand Prix level) trained, dressage horses (DRES; n=5). The training of the DRES horses uses an unnatural head-neck position (Rollkur), whereas in the REC horses such training techniques...

  6. Captive coyotes compared to their counterparts in the wild: does environmental enrichment help?

    Contributor(s):: Shivik, J. A., Palmer, G. L., Gese, E. M., Osthaus, B.

    This article attempts to determine the effects of environment (captive or wild) and a simple form of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of a nonhuman animal. Specifically, analyses first compared behavioral budgets and stereotypic behavior of captive coyotes (Canis latrans)...

  7. Circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus): a factor to consider during welfare assessment

    Contributor(s):: Menargues, A., Urios, V., Liminana, R., Mauri, M.

    Elevated glucocorticoid levels during an extended time period might be a stress indicator in nonhuman animals. Therefore, knowledge of the circadian pattern of cortisol secretion is very important to correctly interpret data obtained for welfare assessment of animals in captivity through salivary...

  8. Description and evaluation of a canine volunteer blood donor program

    Contributor(s):: DeLuca, L. A., Glass, S. G., Johnson, R. E., Burger, M.

    Human volunteer blood donor programs are commonplace, but the concept of nonhuman animal blood banking is relatively new. Few studies exist regarding efficacy, donor screening, and safety for volunteer companion animals. This retrospective study evaluated a nonprofit, community-based canine...

  9. Development and validation of a behavioral acclimation protocol for cats to respiration chambers used for indirect calorimetry studies

    Contributor(s):: Gooding, M. A., Duncan, I. J. H., Atkinson, J. L., Shoveller, A. K.

    Cats exposed to novel environments initiate stress responses by behavioral and physiological changes that modify metabolism and lead to the collection of unreliable data. Fourteen cats (10+or-2 months) were subjected to an 11-week acclimation procedure to adapt to restriction within chambers used...

  10. Do audible and ultrasonic sounds of intensities common in animal facilities affect the autonomic nervous system of rodents?

    Contributor(s):: Burwell, A. K., Baldwin, A. L.

    In animal facilities, noises, often poorly controlled, occur over a wide range of frequencies and intensities. Evidence demonstrates that audible noise and ultrasound have deleterious effects on rodent physiology, but it is not known how they affect the autonomic nervous system (ANS). This study...

  11. Effect of work experience and position in the plow harness on some physiological parameters of horses under field conditions

    Contributor(s):: Aguirre, V., Orihuela, A.

    Six pairs of horses were studied during 6 consecutive days. One horse in each pair had working experience. The position of the 2 animals in the plough harness was alternated each day. Some physical and physiological parameters were measured at different stages during each work day. A split-plot...

  12. Effects of induced molting on the well-being of egg-laying hens

    Contributor(s):: McCowan, B., Schrader, J., DiLorenzo, A. M., Cardona, C., Klingborg, D.

    Induced molting in egg-laying hens is an important method for maximizing hen egg production and quality as well as hen health in commercial settings; however, there is growing societal concern over its effects on hen well-being. Using individual hens as their own controls, this research examined...

  13. Effects of training on stress-related behavior of the common marmoset ( Callithrix jacchus ) in relation to coping with routine husbandry procedures. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Bassett, L., Buchanan-Smith, H. M., McKinley, J., Smith, T. E.

    Using positive reinforcement, 12 common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were trained to provide urine samples on request. The marmosets were exposed to mildly stressful, routine husbandry procedures (i.e., capture and weighing). The non-human animals spent less time inactive poststressor as...

  14. Increasing the frequency of co-mingling piglets during the lactation period alters the development of social behavior before and after weaning

    Contributor(s):: Kanaan, V. T., Lay, D. C., Jr., Richert, B. T., Pajor, E. A.

    The purpose of this study was to determine how increasing the frequency of co-mingling affected piglets' behavior development before and after weaning. Co-mingling once (CM1), piglets interacted with 1 unfamiliar litter Days 10-18 after birth; co-mingling twice (CM2), piglets interacted with 1...

  15. Is it a good idea to train fillies and colts separately?

    Contributor(s):: Janczarek, I., Kedzierski, W.

    This study compared the physiological response to novel situations in sex-separated and sex-mixed groups of horses, as measured by heart rate (HR). The study evaluated the possibility of training horses in a mixed-sex system. The study included 41 Purebred Arabian 21/2-year-olds during their...

  16. Lessons in primate heat tolerance: a commentary based on the "Human Zoo" experience

    Contributor(s):: Litchfield, C., Dorrian, J., Davis, J., Lushington, K., Dawson, D.

    Commentary on lessons from the 2007 Human Zoo Project at the Adelaide Zoo, where a universal complaint by participants was heat discomfort. This issue has led to further investigation into thermoregulation among great apes.

  17. Noise in the animal shelter environment: building design and the effects of daily noise exposure

    Contributor(s):: Coppola, C. L., Enns, R. M., Grandin, T.

    Sound levels in animal shelters regularly exceed 100 dB. Noise is a physical stressor on animals that can lead to behavioral, physiological, and anatomical responses. There are currently no policies regulating noise levels in dog kennels. The objective of this study was to evaluate the noise...

  18. Physiological arousal for companion dogs working with their owners in animal-assisted activities and animal-assisted therapy

    Contributor(s):: Haubenhofer, D. K., Kirchengast, S.

    This study investigated the physiological reactions of companion dogs (Canis familiaris) used in animal-assisted activities and animal-assisted therapy by measuring salivary cortisol concentrations. The dog caregivers (owners) collected saliva samples (a) at 3 control days without therapeutic...

  19. Physiological responses in wild broodstocks of the Caspian Kutum (Rutilus frisii kutum) subjected to transportation stress

    Contributor(s):: Nikoo, M., Falahatkar, B.

  20. Producer or purchaser: different expectations may lead to equine wastage and welfare concerns. (Special Issue: Equitation science.)

    Contributor(s):: Hennessy, K. D., Quinn, K. M., Murphy, J.

    Horses are individual, each having differential characteristics such as height, colour, breeding, conformation, and temperament. These bio-characteristics often influence potential purchasers when buying horses. This study sought to investigate if producers and potential purchasers placed similar...