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  1. Changes in Tursiops truncatus Distribution and Behavior in the Drowned Cayes, Belize, and Correlation to Human Impacts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jazmin Garcia

    Human interaction greatly influences the behavior and distribution of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). This project focuses on the distribution and behavior of bottlenose dolphins in the Drowned Cayes, Belize. Prior to the 2000s, the area was relatively undeveloped and undisturbed and...

  2. Food habits of coyotes, gray foxes, and bobcats in a coastal southern California urban landscape

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Rachel N. Larson, Dana J. Morin, Izabela A. Wierzbowska, Kevin R. Crooks

    Many carnivores are sensitive to habitat fragmentation, and the capacity to shift diets may improve their ability to persist in urban areas. We collected and identified contents of a total of 119 scats from coyotes (Canis latrans), 58 scats from gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and...

  3. Can Responsible Ownership Practices Influence Hunting Behavior of Owned Cats?: Results from a Survey of Cat Owners in Chile

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sebastián Escobar-Aguirre, Raúl A. Alegría-Morán, Javiera Calderón-Amor, Tamara A. Tadich

    The domestic cat (Felis catus) has become a worldwide threat to wildlife. The potential impact of owned cats on wildlife in Chile has not been documented at a large scale. The purpose of this study was to investigate the number and type of prey that owned cats bring back in Chile and its...

  4. The Continuing Saga of Wild Horse Management: Finding a Balance in the Case of One of America's Iconic Symbols

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Elspeth Visser

  5. Status and Magnitude of Grey Wolf Conflict with Pastoral Communities in the Foothills of the Hindu Kush Region of Pakistan

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Tauheed Ullah Khan, Xiaofeng Luan, Shahid Ahmad, Abdul Mannan, Waqif Khan, Abdul Aziz Khan, Barkat Ullah Khan, Emad Ud Din, Suman Bhattarai, Sher Shah, Sajjad Saeed, Ummay Amara

    Pastoralist–wolf conflict over livestock depredation is the main factor affecting conservation of grey wolf worldwide. Very limited research has been carried out to evaluate the pattern and nature of livestock depredation by wolf. This study aims to determine the status and nature of...

  6. Do You Hear What I Hear? Human Perception of Coyote Group Size

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kyle Brewster, Scott E. Henke, Alfonso Ortega, John Tomecek, Benjamin Turner

    Recordings of 1 – 4 coyotes (Canis latrans) that were howling and yip-yapping were played to 427 participants who were asked to estimate the number of coyotes they perceived to hear. Participants were separated by gender (M or F), age group ( 35), resident location (urban, suburban, or...

  7. Assessing Risks to Wildlife from Free-Roaming Hybrid Cats: The Proposed Introduction of Pet Savannah Cats to Australia as a Case Study

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Christopher R. Dickman, Sarah M. Legge, John C. Z. Woinarski

    Hybrid cats—created by crossing different species within the family Felidae—are popular pets, but they could potentially threaten native species if they escape and establish free-roaming populations. To forestall this possibility, the Australian government imposed a specific ban on...

  8. Human-Black Bear Conflicts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Carl W. Lackey, Stewart W. Breck, Brian F. Wakeling, Bryant White

    Most human–black bear (Ursus americanus) conflict occurs when people make anthropogenic foods like garbage, dog food, domestic poultry, or fruit trees available to bears. Bears change their behavior to take advantage of these resources and may damage property or cause public safety...

  9. Evaluating Trophic Rewilding as a Conservation Technique

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Aaron Sieve

    The focus for this paper is to define specifically trophic rewilding, determine its efficacy as a conservation technique, and explore ways to lessen one of its key limitations. Trophic rewilding is the conservation technique whereby an extirpated keystone species or ecosystem engineer is...

  10. The Welfare of Pig-Hunting Dogs in Australia

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Bronwyn Orr, Richard Malik, Jacqui Norris, Mark Westman

    Hunting feral pigs using dogs is a popular recreational activity in Australia. Dogs are used to flush, chase, bail, and hold feral pigs, and their use for these activities is legal in some states and territories and illegal in others. However, there is little knowledge about the health and...

  11. An Analysis of Rabies Incidence and Its Geographic Spread in the Buffer Area Among Orally Vaccinated Wildlife in Ukraine From 2012 to 2016

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ivan Polupan, Maksym Bezymennyi, Yurii Gibaliuk, Zhanna Drozhzhe, Oleksii Rudoi, Vitalii Ukhovskyi, Vitalii Nedosekov, Marco De Nardi

    The statistics of rabies cases in Volyn, Lviv, and Zakarpattia oblasts of Ukraine from 2012 to 2016 were analyzed to establish spatial–temporal distribution of rabies endemic outbreaks and to identify causes of widespread infections among wild and domestic animals. The occurrence of...

  12. Toxoplasma gondii in domiciled dogs and cats in urban areas of Brazil: risk factors and spatial distribution

    | Contributor(s):: Arruda, I. F., Millar, P. R., Barbosa, A. da S., Abboud, L. C. de S., Reis, I. C. dos, Moreira, A. S. da C., Guimaraes, M. P. de P., Amendoeira, M. R. R.

  13. Yawn-like behavior in captive common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

    | Contributor(s):: Enokizu, A., Morisaka, T., Murakami, K., Sakurai, N., Ueda, N., Yoshioka, M.

  14. Why were New World rabbits not domesticated?

    | Contributor(s):: Somerville, A. D., Sugiyama, N.

    2021Animal Frontiers11362-682160-605610.1093/af/vfab026EnglishDepartment of World Languages and Cultures, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA.asomervi@iastate.edutext

  15. Using resident-based hazing programs to reduce human–coyote conflicts in urban environments

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Mary Ann Bonnell, Stewart W. Breck

    The concept of hazing (aversive conditioning) is often promoted as a tool for reducing human–coyote (Canis latrans) conflicts in urban environments. Little scientific evidence exists on the effectiveness of hazing, particularly hazing applied by residents (i.e., community-level hazing)....

  16. Rethinking One Health, Part 1

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Donald F. Smith, Kate Hodgson

    During the trip to Alaska with his dog Beau in 2007, Dr. Smith tells how he recognized a concept so fundamental to the human-animal bond that it changed his whole outlook on One Health. It would later be defined by Dr. Kate Hodgson, a veterinarian at the University of Toronto, using a new term,...

  17. Coyote Attacks on Humans, 1970-2015: Implications for Reducing the Risks

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Marcy Wilhelm-South, Rex O. Baker, Robert M. Timm

    Beginning with the emerging pattern of urban and suburban coyotes (Canis latrans) attacking humans in southern California in the late 1970s, we analyzed information from reported attacks to better understand the factors contributing to changes in coyote behavior. We subsequently used updated...

  18. Evaluating lethal and nonlethal management options for urban coyotes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Stewart W. Breck, Sharon A. Poessel, Mary Ann Bonnell

    Human–coyote (Canis latrans) conflict in urban environments is a growing issue in cities throughout the United States, with the primary problem being the development of problem individuals that are overly bold and aggressive with people and pets. Little research has focused on management...

  19. Friday essay: the cultural meanings of wild horses

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Michael J. Adams

    From 30,000-year-old cave paintings to The Man From Snowy River, wild horses have always been part of human culture. As Australia debates what to do with 'brumbies' in mountain environments, it's time to reconsider their place.

  20. Synanthropic Suburbia

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sarah Gunawan

    Animals are invading the city. Coyotes are sighted on downtown streets with greater frequency, raccoons notoriously forage through greenbins as their primary source of food, and all forms of animals inhabit the surfaces, edges and cavities of the built environment. Once wild animals are now...