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  1. The Dog in the Middle Ages

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Luisa Barbano

  2. The Ethics of Wildlife Control in Humanized Landscapes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: John Hadidian, Camilla H Fox, William S Lynn

    The 21st century is witness to an unprecedented and rapid growth of human settlements, from urban centers to wilderness vacation resorts. Concurrent with this has been the growing tolerance and acceptance of many wild animals and humans for one another. This has created an expanding...

  3. Conservation and Hunting: Till Death Do They Part? A Legal Ethnography of Deer Management

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Irus Braverman

    Claims that hunters are exemplar conservationists would likely come as a surprise to many. Hunters, after all, kill animals. Isn’t there a better way to appreciate wildlife than to kill and consume it? Yet there is no mistake: wildlife managers frequently make the claim that hunters, in...

  4. Good fences make good neighbours: A qualitative, interpretive study of human–baboon and human–human conflict on the Cape Peninsula

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Renelle Terblanche

    Picturesque Cape Town is the epitome of an urban/nature interface but one within which chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) face slander for transgressing both the socially constructed human/animal and nature/culture divide, and/or the actual, physical borderlines associated with these divides. The...

  5. Fatal Tuberculosis in a Free-Ranging African Elephant and One Health Implications of Human Pathogens in Wildlife

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Michele A. Miller, Peter Buss, Eduard O. Roos, Guy Hausler, Anzaan Dippenaar, Emily Mitchell, Louis van Schalkwyk, Suelee Robbe-Austerman, W. Ray Waters, Alina Sikar-Gang, Konstantin P. Lyashchenko, Sven D. C. Parsons, Robin Warren, Paul van Helden

    Tuberculosis (TB) in humans is a global public health concern and the discovery of animal cases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection and disease, especially in multi-host settings, also has significant implications for public health, veterinary disease control, and conservation...

  6. The Dividing Line Between Wildlife Research and Management—Implications for Animal Welfare

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Johan Lindsjö, Katarina Cvek, Elin M. F. Spangenberg, Johan N. G. Olsson, Margareta Stéen

    Wild animals are used for research and management purposes in Sweden and throughout the world. Animals are often subjected to similar procedures and risks of compromised welfare from capture, anesthesia, handling, sampling, marking, and sometimes selective removal. The interpretation of the...

  7. Chlamydia pecorum Associated With an Outbreak of Infectious Keratoconjunctivitis in Semi-domesticated Reindeer in Sweden

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Javier Sánchez Romano, Mikael Leijon, Åsa Hagström, Tomas Jinnerot, Ulrika K. Rockström, Morten Tryland

    Infectious keratoconjunctivitis (IKC), the most common ocular disease in ruminants worldwide, has affected semi-domesticated Eurasian reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) for over 100 years, both as individual cases and in outbreaks affecting tens to hundreds of animals. Recurrent IKC...

  8. "Feelings and Fitness" Not "Feelings or Fitness"–The Raison d'être of Conservation Welfare, Which Aligns Conservation and Animal Welfare Objectives

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ngaio J. Beausoleil, David J. Mellor, Liv Baker, Sandra E. Baker, Mariagrazia Bellio, Alison S. Clarke, Arnja Dale, Steve Garlick, Bidda Jones, Andrea Harvey, Benjamin J. Pitcher, Sally Sherwen, Karen A. Stockin, Sarah Zito

    Increasingly, human activities, including those aimed at conserving species and ecosystems (conservation activities) influence not only the survival and fitness but also the welfare of wild animals. Animal welfare relates to how an animal is experiencing its life and encompasses both its...

  9. Diversity of Anaplasma and Ehrlichia/Neoehrlichia Agents in Terrestrial Wild Carnivores Worldwide: Implications for Human and Domestic Animal Health and Wildlife Conservation

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Marcos Rogério André

    Recently, the incidence and awareness of tick-borne diseases in humans and animals have increased due to several factors, which in association favor the chances of contact among wild animals and their ectoparasites, domestic animals and humans. Wild and domestic carnivores are considered the...

  10. Human-animal interaction in the Antarctic: an animal behaviour approach to human disturbance of penguin colonies

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Amanda Nimon-Peters

    Human disturbance of Antarctic penguins is an important aspect of Antarctic conservation. It is a phenomenon which has raised concern for several decades, and has prompted the creation of guidelines for human behaviour which aim to minimise disturbance to these and other Antarctic animals....

  11. Living in elephant worlds: human-elephant relations on the fringe of forest and village in Assam, Northeast India

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Paul Keil

    The worlds and practices of the people we study are not produced by human intention and action alone. They emerge in interaction with other organisms, materials, and forces that constitute a person’s field of relations. A multispecies or more-than-human approach to anthropology seeks to...

  12. Risky business: Causes and conservation implications of human-moor macaque (macaca maura) interactions in south Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kristen Morrow

    Human and nonhuman primates (primates, hereafter) interact with one another in diverse ways. Although the nature of these interactions has been well documented, we still have limited insight as to why humans and primates interact in the patterns we observe. Drawing from life history theory,...

  13. What vaccinating vampire bats can teach us about pandemics | Daniel Streicker

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Daniel Streicker

    Could we anticipate the next big disease outbreak, stopping a virus like Ebola before it ever strikes? In this talk about frontline scientific research, ecologist Daniel Streicker takes us to the Amazon rainforest in Peru where he tracks the movement of vampire bats in order to forecast and...

  14. Using Feminist Theories to Explore Human-animal Relationships: Pigeons in the City

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Yue Yin

    The unequal human-animal relationships regard human beings as superior to other species. They exit in various kinds of human-animal interactions (i.e. our consumption of animal products, and our use of animals as tools or entertainment). This human-dominant relationship is the result of the...

  15. How a handful of fishing villages sparked a marine conservation revolution | Alasdair Harris

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Alasdair Harris

    We need a radically new approach to ocean conservation, says marine biologist and TED Fellow Alasdair Harris. In a visionary talk, he lays out a surprising solution to the problem of overfishing that could both revive marine life and rebuild local fisheries -- all by taking less from the ocean....

  16. How you can help save the bees, one hive at a time | Noah Wilson-Rich

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Noah Wilson-Rich

    Bees are dying off in record numbers, but ecologist Noah Wilson-Rich is interested in something else: Where are bees healthy and thriving? To find out, he recruited citizen scientists across the US to set up beehives in their backyards, gardens and rooftops. Learn how these little data...

  17. The pigeons of Passchendaele – and why animals still suffer and die in modern conflicts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Gervase Phillips

    Next month marks the 100th anniversary of one of the bloodiest battles of World War I. Much has been written about the massive human cost of that war but what is perhaps less well-known is how many animals were killed and the impact these creatures – particularly the pigeons – had...

  18. African snakes: myths debunked | Marcel van Driel | TEDxLusaka

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Marcel van Driel

    There are many myths about African snakes. In this talk, Marcel addresses the three most important ones by using logic and common sense. This talk was recorded at TEDxLusaka 2019: The power of togetherness held on 1st June 2019 at the NIPA Convention Centre. Marcel van Driel is a passionate...

  19. Ecotourism and Human-Bear Relations in Ontario: Working for Multispecies Respect and Economic Sustainability

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Victoria Readings

    Relations between northern Ontario’s human communities and black bears have often been violent, and hunting is promoted for economic and “safety” reasons. The Ontario spring bear hunt was previously banned but was recently reinstated, compounding concerns about human-bear...

  20. Human wildlife conflicts and interaction : the impact of oil exploration and development in Buliisa, Uganda

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Isaac Sserwanga

    After discovery of an estimated 2.5 billion of commercially viable oil, worth $2 billion in annual revenue for 20 years in the Albertine graben, Uganda’s pursuit for a middle state income status seemed attainable. However, the oil reserves are situated in biodiversity sensitive area, with...