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  1. The Ethics of Wildlife Control in Humanized Landscapes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: John Hadidian, Camilla H. Fox, William S. Lynn

    The 21st century is witness to an unprecedented and rapid growth of human settlements, from urban centers to wilderness vacation resorts. Concurrent with this has been the growing tolerance and acceptance of many wild animals and humans for one another. This has created an expanding...

  2. Performing Whale-Watching in Juneau, Alaska

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Chelsea Karthauser

    Nature-based tourism activities provide special contexts for human-wildlife interaction. In Juneau, Alaska, summertime tourists seek encounters with humpback whales, hundreds of which feed seasonally in Southeast Alaska’s coastal waterways. Tourists support a thriving whale-watching...

  3. Who's a Good Handler? Important Skills and Personality Profiles of Wildlife Detection Dog Handlers

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: La Toya J. Jamieson, Greg S. Baxter, Peter J. Murray

    Wildlife detection dog teams are employed internationally for environmental surveys, and their success often depends on the dog handler. Minimal research is available on the skills that dog handlers believe are important, and no research has been published on the personality profiles of...

  4. Not your regular cat person | Latika Nath | TEDxBITSPilani

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Latika Nath

    Latika Nath is a conservational ecologist and a wildlife photographer. She was awarded the title of ‘The Tiger Princess’ by National Geographic in 2001 which featured her work. She is the first woman biologist in India with a doctorate on tigers. She has spent over twenty-five years...

  5. Conserving Vermont's Endangered Species through Designation of Critical Habitat

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Amanda M. Ramsing-Lund

    Although the Endangered Species Act of 1973 is federal legislation, protection of threatened and endangered (T & E) species varies in stringency across states. H.570 (Act 145) is a Vermont law passed during the 2015-2016 legislative session that updated some of the legal protections for T...

  6. Space use by resident and transient coyotes in an urban–rural landscape mosaic

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Numi Mitchell, MichaelW. Strohbach, Ralph Pratt, Wendy C. Finn, Eric G. Strauss

    Context. Coyotes (Canis latrans) have adapted successfully to human landscape alteration in the past 150 years and in recent decades have successfully moved into urban areas. While this causes concern about human–wildlife conflicts, research also suggests that coyotes tend to avoid humans...

  7. Parental Habituation to Human Disturbance Over Time Reduces Fear of Humans in Coyote Offspring

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Christopher J. Schell, Julie K. Young, Elizabeth V. Lonsdorf, Rachel M. Santymire, Jill M. Mateo

    A fundamental tenet of maternal effects assumes that maternal variance over time should have discordant consequences for offspring traits across litters. Yet, seldom are parents observed across multiple reproductive bouts, with few studies consider‐ ing anthropogenic disturbances as an...

  8. How bees can keep the peace between elephants and humans | Lucy King

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lucy King

    Imagine waking in the middle of the night to an elephant ripping the roof from your house in search of food. This is a reality in some communities in Africa where, as wild spaces shrink, people and elephants are competing for space and resources like never before. In this engaging talk,...

  9. Human-wildlife conflict-causes, consequences and mitigation measures with special reference to Kashmir

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Aadil Habib, Ishfaq Nazir, Mustahson F. Fazili, Bilal A. Bhat

    The rising levels of man-animal conflicts at various locations of Kashmir valley in India are due to close proximity between humans and wild carnivores particularly leopard and black bear. The data regarding human injuries and mortalities caused during conflicts from 2010 to 2012 was collected...

  10. Deadly cures: how venomous animals could save your life | Glenn King | TEDxUQ

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Glenn King

    Creepy crawlies are much more than the stuff of nightmares. Animal venoms have numerous properties that could serve as exceptional therapeutics for life-threatening medical conditions. Professor Glenn King, a pioneer in development of new applications for animal venom, believes the next...

  11. Hunting as a Management Tool? Cougar-Human Conflict is Positively Related to Trophy Hunting

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kristine J. Teichman, Bogdan Cristescu, Chris T. Darimont

    Background: Overexploitation and persecution of large carnivores resulting from conflict with humans comprise major causes of declines worldwide. Although little is known about the interplay between these mortality types, hunting of predators remains a common management strategy aimed at...

  12. Underreporting of wildlife-vehicle collisions does not hinder predictive models for large ungulates

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Nathan P. Snow, William F. Porter, David M. Williams

    Conflicts from wildlife–vehicle collisions (WVCs) pose serious challenges for managing and conserving large ungulates throughout the world. However, underreporting of large proportions of WVCs (i.e., two-thirds of WVCs in some cases) creates concern for relying on governmental databases...

  13. Public geospatial datasets as an approach to maximizing efficiency in the collection of site covariates in wildlife–vehicle collision studies

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: James A. Vance, Walter H. Smith, Gabrielle L. Smith

    Wildlife–vehicle collisions (WVCs) are a major research focus because of increasing human health and safety concerns and the potential for biological impacts on wildlife. A key component of both understanding the causes of WVCs and designing mitigation measures is the collection and...

  14. Environmental factors influencing the occurrence of coyotes and conflicts in urban areas

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sharon A. Poessel, Eric M. Gese, Julie K. Young

    The increase of global urbanization can have effects on wildlife species, including carnivores such as coyotes (Canis latrans). As coyotes continue to settle in more urban areas, reports of human-coyote conflicts, such as attacks on humans or pets, may also increase. Understanding environmental...

  15. A benefit-cost analysis decision framework for mitigation of disease transmission at the wildlife–livestock interface

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Stephanie A Shwiff, Steven J Sweeney, Julie L Elser, Ryan S Miller, Matthew L Farnsworth, Pauline Nol, Steven S Shwiff, Aaron M Anderson

    The economics of managing disease transmission at the wildlife–livestock interface have received heightened attention as agricultural and natural resource agencies struggle to tackle growing risks to animal health. In the fiscal landscape of increased scrutiny and shrinking budgets,...

  16. Human development and climate affect hibernation in a large carnivore with implications for human–carnivore conflicts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Heather E. Johnson, David L. Lewis, Tana L. Verzuh, Cody F. Wallace, Rebecca M. Much, Lyle K. Willmarth, Stewart W. Breck

    1. Expanding human development and climate change are dramatically altering habitat conditions for wildlife. While the initial response of wildlife to changing environmental conditions is typically a shift in behavior, little is known about the effects of these stressors on hibernation...

  17. Review of Wildlife Hazard Mitigation Techniques on General Aviation Airports

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Robert J. Lewis, Joe N. Caudell

    Large commercial airports, also known as Part 139 airports, are required by federal regulation to monitor and control wildlife activity. Due to the regulatory nature of 14 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 139.337, and the size and scope of these airports, there is sufficient funding to...

  18. The Dog in the Middle Ages

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Luisa Barbano

  19. The Ethics of Wildlife Control in Humanized Landscapes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: John Hadidian, Camilla H Fox, William S Lynn

    The 21st century is witness to an unprecedented and rapid growth of human settlements, from urban centers to wilderness vacation resorts. Concurrent with this has been the growing tolerance and acceptance of many wild animals and humans for one another. This has created an expanding...

  20. Conservation and Hunting: Till Death Do They Part? A Legal Ethnography of Deer Management

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Irus Braverman

    Claims that hunters are exemplar conservationists would likely come as a surprise to many. Hunters, after all, kill animals. Isn’t there a better way to appreciate wildlife than to kill and consume it? Yet there is no mistake: wildlife managers frequently make the claim that hunters, in...