You are here: Home / Tags / Abnormal behavior / All Categories

Tags: Abnormal behavior

All Categories (1-20 of 364)

  1. Do rabbits need each other? Effects of single versus paired housing on rabbit body temperature and behaviour in a UK shelter

    Contributor(s):: Burn, C. C., Shields, P.

  2. A persistent abnormal repetitive behaviour in a false water cobra (Hydrodynastes gigas)

    Contributor(s):: Michaels, C. J., Gini, B. F., Clifforde, L.

  3. Does mirror enrichment improve primate well-being?

    Contributor(s):: de Groot, B., Cheyne, S. M.

  4. Behavioural differences between weaner pigs with intact and docked tails

    Contributor(s):: Paoli, M. A., Lahrmann, H. P., Jensen, T., D'Eath, R. B.

  5. An introduction to navigating owner-directed feline aggression

    Contributor(s):: Dimenna, G.

  6. Beyond puppy selection-considering the role of puppy raisers in bringing out the best in assistance dog puppies

    Contributor(s):: Mai, D. L., Howell, T., Benton, P., Bennett, P. C.

  7. Penal sanctioning of zoophilia in light of the legal status of animals - a comparative analysis of fifteen European countries

    Contributor(s):: Vetter, S., Boros, A., Ozsvari, L.

  8. The influence of sex, rearing history, and personality on abnormal behaviour in zoo-housed bonobos (Pan paniscus)

    Contributor(s):: Laméris, Daan W., Staes, Nicky, Salas, Marina, Matthyssen, Steffi, Verspeek, Jonas, Stevens, Jeroen M. G.

  9. A pilot study on the effects of a change in behavioural management on the behaviour of captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    Contributor(s):: Kranendonk, Godelieve, Schippers, Eva P.

    The debate on the use of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) in biomedical research has been ongoing for several years now. In 2012, the decision was made to retire a large number of laboratory chimpanzees in the United States of America. Relocation of these animals to sanctuaries, rescue centres, and...

  10. Novelty exploration, baseline cortisol level and fur-chewing in farm mink with different intensities of stereotypic behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Svendsen, Pernille M., Palme, Rupert, Malmkvist, Jens

    The present study aimed to examine the extent to which abnormal behaviours, stereotypic behaviour and fur-chewing, commonly used indicators of reduced welfare, are interrelated and linked to other welfare indicators in mink. Three groups were used based on behavioural observations, mink with no...

  11. How much is enough? The amount of straw necessary to satisfy pigs’ need to perform exploratory behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Pedersen, Lene J., Herskin, Mette S., Forkman, Björn, Halekoh, Ulrich, Kristensen, Kristian M., Jensen, Margit B.

    Since 10 years, EU-legislation states that ‘pigs must have permanent access to sufficient quantity of material to enable proper investigation and manipulation activities’. While much research has focused on which materials ‘enable proper investigation and manipulation activities’, little has been...

  12. Effectiveness of fluoxetine to control fur-chewing behaviour in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera)

    Contributor(s):: Galeano, María G., Ruiz, Rubén D., Cuneo, Marta Fiol de, Ponzio, Marina F.

    Due to its complexity and the relative lack of scientific reports, fur-chewing may be considered as one of the most challenging behavioural problems common to captive chinchillas. The development of this behaviour in commercial farms and the increasing popularity of this species as a pet have...

  13. Chimpanzees use multiple strategies to limit aggression and stress during spatial density changes

    Contributor(s):: Duncan, Luke Mangaliso, Jones, Megan Anne, van Lierop, Mathew, Pillay, Neville

    The regulation of aggression in captive animals is an important welfare concern. Captive environments typically provide limited space for animals and many species exhibit heightened aggression in response to spatial restriction. However, primates appear to regulate aggression under these...

  14. Tail biting in fattening pigs: Associations between frequency of tail biting and other abnormal behaviours

    Contributor(s):: Brunberg, Emma, Wallenbeck, Anna, Keeling, Linda J.

    This study investigated the association between tail biting (TB) and other abnormal behaviours in a group of non-tail docked pigs. Behavioural data were collected from 742 pigs housed on a commercial farm. The prevalence of performed and received TB, belly nosing, bar biting, ear biting and...

  15. Early rearing interacts with temperament and housing to influence the risk for motor stereotypy in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Contributor(s):: Vandeleest, Jessica J., McCowan, Brenda, Capitanio, John P.

    Laboratory and zoo housed non-human primates sometimes exhibit abnormal behaviors that are thought to reflect reduced well-being. Previous research attempted to identify risk factors to aid in the prevention and treatment of these behaviors, and focused on demographic (e.g. sex or age) and...

  16. Cross-sucking by dairy calves may become a habit or reflect characteristics of individual calves more than milk allowance or weaning

    Contributor(s):: de Passillé, Anne Marie, Borderas, Fernando, Rushen, Jeffrey

    To examine the effects of milk allowance and weaning age on cross-sucking, 45 dairy calves were housed in groups of nine and fed milk and grain-based starter feed from automated feeders and allocated to three treatment groups: (A) Low-Milk Early-Weaned (fed 6L/d of milk until weaned at 47 d of...

  17. Comparing the relative benefits of grooming-contact and full-contact pairing for laboratory-housed adult female Macaca fascicularis

    Contributor(s):: Lee, Grace H., Thom, Jinhee P., Chu, Katherine L., Crockett, Carolyn M.

    Tactile social contact is the most effective form of environmental enrichment for promoting normal behavior in captive primates. For laboratory macaques housed indoors, pair housing is the most common method for socialization. Pairs can be housed either in full contact (FC), or in protected...

  18. Behaviour and welfare of veal calves fed different amounts of solid feed supplemented to a milk replacer ration adjusted for similar growth

    Contributor(s):: Webb, Laura E., Bokkers, Eddie A. M., Engel, Bas, Gerrits, Walter J. J., Berends, Harma, van Reenen, Cornelis G.

    Veal calves in Europe are typically fed large quantities of milk replacer and small amounts of solid feed, a diet known to lead to the development of abnormal oral behaviours in these animals. These abnormal oral behaviours are thought to be an indication of frustration, chronic stress, and hence...

  19. Towards a taxonomy of stereotypic behaviours in the American mink (Neovison vison), a model Carnivore: Homogeneous or heterogeneous?

    Contributor(s):: Polanco, Andrea, Campbell, Dana L. M., Díez-León, María, Mason, Georgia

    Stereotypic behaviours (SBs) are sometimes assumed homogeneous, despite their diverse morphologies, as if sharing a common aetiology. However, if different SB forms are instead heterogeneous, they may have different causes, potentially impacting how best to prevent or manage them. We therefore...

  20. The effect of alternative feeding strategies during rearing on the behaviour of broiler breeder pullets

    Contributor(s):: Arrazola, Aitor, Mosco, Elyse, Widowski, Tina M., Guerin, Michele T., Kiarie, Elijah G., Torrey, Stephanie

    Broiler breeders are feed-restricted during rearing to avoid the negative consequences of obesity during lay due to their genetic potential for fast growth rate. Feed restriction leads to chronic hunger, frustration and lack of satiety as indicated by hyperactivity, restlessness and...