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  1. Human development and climate affect hibernation in a large carnivore with implications for human–carnivore conflicts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Heather E. Johnson, David L. Lewis, Tana L. Verzuh, Cody F. Wallace, Rebecca M. Much, Lyle K. Willmarth, Stewart W. Breck

    1. Expanding human development and climate change are dramatically altering habitat conditions for wildlife. While the initial response of wildlife to changing environmental conditions is typically a shift in behavior, little is known about the effects of these stressors on hibernation...

  2. Behavior of Scandinavian brown bears when encountered by dogs and humans

    | Contributor(s):: Stine Emilie Noding Hansen

    The Scandinavian brown bear population was persecuted in the last half of the 1800s and almost went extinct. They got protected in Sweden in 1927 and in Norway in 1973, and have since reached a level that can be hunted. The bears choose areas with as little human activity as possible, but...

  3. Behaviour of brown bears (Ursus arctos) when repeatedly approached by humans on foot

    | Contributor(s):: Nina Emilie Stenset

    Knowledge about encounters between humans and wildlife is important for conservation, management and policymaking, as well as for reducing conflict and negative interactions. There is general concern that an increased number of encounters might reduce wildlife flight responses. I investigated the...

  4. Social networks and welfare in future animal management

    | Contributor(s):: Koene, P., Ipema, B.

    It may become advantageous to keep human-managed animals in the social network groups to which they have adapted. Data concerning the social networks of farm animal species and their ancestors are scarce but essential to establishing the importance of a natural social network for farmed animal...

  5. Local Attitudes towards Bear Management after Illegal Feeding and Problem Bear Activity

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sara Dubois, David Fraser

    The “pot bears” received international media attention in 2010 after police discovered the intentional feeding of over 20 black bears during the investigation of an alleged marijuana-growing operation in Christina Lake, British Columbia, Canada. A two-phase random digit dialing survey...

  6. Behavioural decisions for managing social distance and aggression in captive polar bears ( Ursus maritimus )

    | Contributor(s):: Renner, M. J., Kelly, A. L.

    The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) in most zoos attracts high levels of public attention and can play an important role in conservation education. Polar bears in the wild are typically solitary; bears in captivity often house socially. This study reported behavioural evidence on how bears manage...

  7. Introducing a semi-naturalistic exhibit as structural enrichment for two brown bears ( Ursus arctos ). Does this ensure their captive well-being?

    | Contributor(s):: Soriano, A. I., Ensenyat, C., Serrat, S., Mate, C.

    In this study we used the daily activity pattern and use of space as indicators of change in the program of structural enrichment, implemented with 2 subjects of the species Ursus arctos in the Barcelona Zoo. We collected 930 sampling points in each study phase for each of the individuals: The...

  8. Activity and enrichment use in disabled Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus) rescued from bile farms

    | Contributor(s):: Dallaire, J. A., Field, N., Mason, G. J.

  9. Aggressive body language of bears and wildlife viewing: a response to Geist (2011)

    | Contributor(s):: Stringham, S. F.

  10. Does diversionary feeding create nuisance bears and jeopardize public safety?

    | Contributor(s):: Rogers, L. L.

  11. Misconceptions about black bears: a response to Geist (2011)

    | Contributor(s):: Rogers, L. L., Mansfield, S. A.

  12. Response to Rogers and Mansfield (2011) and Stringham (2011)

    | Contributor(s):: Geist, V.

  13. Using stable isotope analysis to quantify anthropogenic foraging in black bears

    | Contributor(s):: Merkle, J. A., Derbridge, J. J., Krausman, P. R.

  14. Human-wildlife conflicts influence attitudes but not necessarily behaviors: factors driving the poaching of bears in China

    | Contributor(s):: Liu, Fang, McShea, W. J., Garshelis, D. L., Zhu, XiaoJian, Wang, DaJun, Shao, LiangKun

  15. Interactions between wildlife viewers and habituated brown bears, 1987-1992

    | Contributor(s):: Fagen, J. M., Fagen, R.

    Public participation in wildlife viewing has increased in recent years in the USA and is expected to continue to increase. The article presents and analyses direct, systematic observations of 322 human interactions with known, habituated brown bears over six consecutive years from 1987-92 at Pack...

  16. Stereotypies and attentiveness to novel stimuli: a test in polar bears

    | Contributor(s):: Wechsler, B.

    Marks of unfamiliar odours were placed on the stereotyped paths of two captive polar bears in order to test their attentiveness to novel stimuli during stereotyped walking. Both individuals significantly increased their rate of sniffing compared with stereotyped walking bouts without odour marks...

  17. Stereotypy and perseverative responding in caged bears: further data and analyses

    | Contributor(s):: Vickery, S. S., Mason, G. J.

    Stereotypies are common in captive animals; yet, their underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. One hypothesis [Garner, J.P., 1999. The aetiology of stereotypy in caged animals. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Oxford, UK] proposes them to be symptoms of altered behavioural organisation...

  18. Comparison between 28 zoological parks: stereotypic and social behaviours of captive brown bears ( Ursus arctos )

    | Contributor(s):: Montaudouin, S., Pape, G. le

    In the present study we compared 33 enclosures in 28 parks, with a total of 66 bears. We chose direct observation of behaviour rather than surveys. Each enclosure was observed during one day; stereotypies and social relationships were qualitatively noted in types and amount. The connections of...

  19. Evaluation of different observational sampling regimes for use in zoological parks

    | Contributor(s):: Margulis, S. W., Westhus, E. J.

    Observational sampling methods provide clearly-defined guidelines for collection and analysis of behavioral data. In some situations, use of formal sampling regimes may be impractical or impossible. A case in point is data collection conducted by animal care staff at zoological parks and aquaria....

  20. Symbolic animals and the developing self

    | Contributor(s):: Myers, G.

    This study examined developmental changes in animal symbols of the self, as revealed by identification with six animals (lion, eagle, bear, rabbit, lamb and cow) by children aged from 4 to 5 years (n=10), 10 to 11 years (n=9), and 17 to 18 years (n=10). Overall, the eagle, rabbit and lion...