You are here: Home / Tags / Bears + Zoo and captive wild animals / All Categories

Tags: Bears + Zoo and captive wild animals

All Categories (1-16 of 16)

  1. Meeting and merging: painting animal/human encounters with medicine

    Contributor(s):: Jo Voysey

    My work focuses on the expressive potential of medicinal remedies as a medium for painting. My exploration is concentrated on aspects of the human relationship to animals in captivity and stems from a relationship I had with a caged bear when I was living in Georgia, Eastern Europe in 2011. The...

  2. A Quantitative Analysis of Kalandars and Captive Bears in Pakistan

    Contributor(s):: Thomas P. Rooney, Kendra C. Millam

    In 2013, the Bioresource Research Centre (Islamabad, Pakistan) conducted a comprehensive census of the remaining dancing and bear-baiting bears in Pakistan. This involved locating and counting the actual involved bears and bear keepers (kalandars), collecting detailed socio-economic data from the...

  3. Social networks and welfare in future animal management

    Contributor(s):: Koene, P., Ipema, B.

    It may become advantageous to keep human-managed animals in the social network groups to which they have adapted. Data concerning the social networks of farm animal species and their ancestors are scarce but essential to establishing the importance of a natural social network for farmed animal...

  4. Viewing grizzly bears in captivity | an exploration of visitor dialogue and meanings associated with the experience

    Contributor(s):: Stefanie A. Kearns

  5. Behavioural decisions for managing social distance and aggression in captive polar bears ( Ursus maritimus )

    Contributor(s):: Renner, M. J., Kelly, A. L.

    The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) in most zoos attracts high levels of public attention and can play an important role in conservation education. Polar bears in the wild are typically solitary; bears in captivity often house socially. This study reported behavioural evidence on how bears manage...

  6. Effects of Inedible, Manipulable Objects on Captive Bears

    Contributor(s):: Altman, Joanne D.

    Examines the effect of inedible, manipulable objects on appetitive behavior of captive bears in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Behavioral patterns of bears; Reaction of a bear sloth to the presence of female spectacled bear; Comparison of the reaction of polar, sloth and spectacled bears to plastic...

  7. Introducing a semi-naturalistic exhibit as structural enrichment for two brown bears ( Ursus arctos ). Does this ensure their captive well-being?

    Contributor(s):: Soriano, A. I., Ensenyat, C., Serrat, S., Mate, C.

    In this study we used the daily activity pattern and use of space as indicators of change in the program of structural enrichment, implemented with 2 subjects of the species Ursus arctos in the Barcelona Zoo. We collected 930 sampling points in each study phase for each of the individuals: The...

  8. The effects of automated scatter feeders on captive grizzly bear activity budgets

    Contributor(s):: Andrews, N. L. P., Ha, J. C.

    Although captive bears are popular zoo attractions, they are known to exhibit high levels of repetitive behaviors (RBs). These behaviors have also made them particularly popular subjects for welfare research. To date, most research on ursid welfare has focused on various feeding methods that seek...

  9. The role of zoos in the rehabilitation of animals in the circus

    Contributor(s):: Gupta, B. K., Bipul, Chakraborty

    In 1998, the government of India enforced a ban on performance/exhibition of 5 species of nonhuman animals: (a) lions, (b) tigers, (c) leopards, (d) bears, and (e) monkeys. The Ministry of Environment and Forests gave the responsibility to the Central Zoo Authority (CZA) for rehabilitation of...

  10. Behavioural assessment of dental pain in captive Malayan sun bears ( Helarctos malayanus)

    Contributor(s):: Fleming, M., Burn, C. C.

    Captive bears are prone to developing dental pathology for reasons including longevity in captivity, inappropriate diet, trauma, and stereotypical bar biting. If not detected, this can cause pain and suffering, with negative welfare consequences. As animals cannot verbally express feelings,...

  11. Stereotypies and attentiveness to novel stimuli: a test in polar bears

    Contributor(s):: Wechsler, B.

    Marks of unfamiliar odours were placed on the stereotyped paths of two captive polar bears in order to test their attentiveness to novel stimuli during stereotyped walking. Both individuals significantly increased their rate of sniffing compared with stereotyped walking bouts without odour marks...

  12. Stereotypy and perseverative responding in caged bears: further data and analyses

    Contributor(s):: Vickery, S. S., Mason, G. J.

    Stereotypies are common in captive animals; yet, their underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. One hypothesis [Garner, J.P., 1999. The aetiology of stereotypy in caged animals. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Oxford, UK] proposes them to be symptoms of altered behavioural organisation...

  13. Comparison between 28 zoological parks: stereotypic and social behaviours of captive brown bears ( Ursus arctos )

    Contributor(s):: Montaudouin, S., Pape, G. le

    In the present study we compared 33 enclosures in 28 parks, with a total of 66 bears. We chose direct observation of behaviour rather than surveys. Each enclosure was observed during one day; stereotypies and social relationships were qualitatively noted in types and amount. The connections of...

  14. Evaluation of different observational sampling regimes for use in zoological parks

    | Contributor(s):: Margulis, S. W., Westhus, E. J.

    Observational sampling methods provide clearly-defined guidelines for collection and analysis of behavioral data. In some situations, use of formal sampling regimes may be impractical or impossible. A case in point is data collection conducted by animal care staff at zoological parks and aquaria....

  15. Cross-institutional assessment of stress responses in zoo animals using longitudinal monitoring of faecal corticoids and behaviour

    | Contributor(s):: Shepherdson, D. J., Carlstead, K. C., Wielebnowski, N.

    Cross-institutional studies that combine non-invasive physiological measures of stress responses and the assessment of individual differences in behaviour and temperament have great potential as tools for assessing the well-being of zoo animals and for identifying key environmental stimuli...

  16. Pacing polar bears and stoical sheep: testing ecological and evolutionary hypotheses about animal welfare

    | Contributor(s):: Clubb, R., Mason, G.

    Responses to potential threats to welfare vary greatly between species. Even closely related animals often differ in their fear of humans and/or novelty; their behavioural responses to pain; and when captive, their overall welfare and the form and frequency of their stereotypies. Such species...