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Tags: Behavior and behavior mechanisms + Personality

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  1. Negative attitudes of Danish dairy farmers to their livestock correlates negatively with animal welfare

    Contributor(s):: Andreasen, S. N., Sandoe, P., Waiblinger, S., Forkman, B.

  2. Concurrent and Predictive Criterion Validity of a Puppy Behaviour Questionnaire for Predicting Training Outcome in Juvenile Guide Dogs

    Contributor(s):: Hunt, R. L., England, G. C. W., Asher, L., Whiteside, H., Harvey, N. D.

  3. Parallels in the interactive effect of highly sensitive personality and social factors on behaviour problems in dogs and humans

    Contributor(s):: Bräm Dubé, M., Asher, L., Würbel, H., Riemer, S., Melotti, L.

  4. Does training style affect the human-horse relationship? Asking the horse in a separation–reunion experiment with the owner and a stranger

    Contributor(s):: Lundberg, Paulina, Hartmann, Elke, Roth, Lina S. V.

    Humans have shared a long history with horses and today we mainly consider horses as companions for sports and leisure activities. Previously, the human perspective of the human-horse relationship has been investigated but there has been little focus on the horse’s perspective. This study aimed...

  5. Development and consistency of fearfulness in horses from foal to adult

    Contributor(s):: Christensen, Janne Winther, Beblein, Carina, Malmkvist, Jens

    Understanding the development and consistency of behavioural responses across life stages is of both fundamental and applied interest. In horses, fearfulness is particularly important because fear reactions are a major cause of human-horse accidents, and because fear is a negative emotional state...

  6. Long-term stress levels are synchronized in dogs and their owners

    Contributor(s):: Sundman, A. S., Van Poucke, E., Svensson Holm, A. C., Faresjö, Å, Theodorsson, E., Jensen, P., Roth, L. S. V.

  7. Temperament in Domestic Cats: A Review of Proximate Mechanisms, Methods of Assessment, Its Effects on Human-Cat Relationships, and One Welfare

    Contributor(s):: Travnik, I. C., Machado, D. S., Gonçalves, L. D. S., Ceballos, M. C., Sant'Anna, A. C.

  8. Seizure-alerting behavior in dogs owned by people experiencing seizures

    Contributor(s):: Martos Martinez-Caja, A., De Herdt, V., Boon, P., Brandl, U., Cock, H., Parra, J., Perucca, E., Thadani, V., Moons, C. P. H.

  9. The Behavioral Style of the Cat Predicts Owner Satisfaction

    Contributor(s):: Elvers, Greg C., Lawriw, Alexander N.

    A 9-item, reliable measure of owner satisfaction with their cat, the CatSat, was developed. Item response analysis indicated that the CatSat discriminates lower levels of satisfaction better than higher levels. Correlations between the CatSat and a measure of attachment to the cat (Lexington...

  10. Early experiences modulate stress coping in a population of German shepherd dogs

    Contributor(s):: Foyer, Pernilla, Wilsson, Erik, Wright, Dominic, Jensen, Per

    Early experiences may alter later behavioural expressions in animals and these differences can be consistent through adulthood. In dogs, this may have a profound impact on welfare and working ability and, it is therefore interesting to evaluate how experiences during the first weeks of life...

  11. Towards a more objective assessment of equine personality using behavioural and physiological observations from performance test training

    Contributor(s):: König von Borstel, Uta, Pasing, Stephanie, Gauly, Matthias

    Current definitions of horse personality traits are rather vague, lacking clear, universally accepted guidelines for evaluation in performance tests. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to screen behavioural and physiological measurements taken during riding for potential links with...

  12. Individual differences in metabolism predict coping styles in fish

    Contributor(s):: Martins, Catarina I. M., Castanheira, Maria F., Engrola, Sofia, Costas, Benjamín, Conceição, Luís E. C.

    Studies on metabolism usually rely on measurements of oxygen consumption obtained in respirometry chambers. Despite rigorous standardization there is still considerable inter-individual variation in metabolic rates which is often ignored. Furthermore, housing in respirometry chambers implies...

  13. Behavioural responses to hypoxia provide a non-invasive method for distinguishing between stress coping styles in fish

    Contributor(s):: Laursen, Danielle Caroline, L. Olsén, Hanna, Ruiz-Gomez, Maria de Lourdes, Winberg, Svante, Höglund, Erik

    Two divergent behavioural and physiological response patterns to challenges have been identified in mammals and birds, frequently termed the proactive and reactive coping styles. In recent years, individually distinct coping styles have also been observed in several species of fish. These...

  14. Personality is associated with feeding behavior and performance in dairy calves

    Contributor(s):: Neave, H. W., Costa, J. H. C., Weary, D. M., von Keyserlingk, M. A. G.

  15. Chimpanzees with positive welfare are happier, extraverted, and emotionally stable

    Contributor(s):: Robinson, Lauren M., Altschul, Drew M., Wallace, Emma K., Úbeda, Yulán, Llorente, Miquel, Machanda, Zarin, Slocombe, Katie E., Leach, Matthew C., Waran, Natalie K., Weiss, Alexander

    Facilities housing captive animals are full of staff who, every day, interact with the animals under their care. The expertise and familiarity of staff can be used to monitor animal welfare by means of questionnaires. It was the goal of our study to examine the association between chimpanzee (Pan...

  16. Personality predicts the responses to environmental enrichment at the group but not within-groups in stereotypic African striped mice, Rhabdomys dilectus

    Contributor(s):: Joshi, Sneha, Pillay, Neville

    Environmental enrichment is used to enhance the well-being of captive animals and to prevent or reduce stereotypic and other abnormal behaviours. However, environmental enrichment does not always succeed in its intended purpose. We investigated whether personality (i.e. consistent individual...

  17. Unpredictability in food supply during early life influences growth and boldness in European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax

    Contributor(s):: Sébastien, Ferrari, Leguay, Didier, Vergnet, Alain, Vidal, Marie-Odile, Chatain, Béatrice, Bégout, Marie-Laure

    Biological variability is no longer considered as statistical noise, but rather as an adaptive benefit. This variability comes from consistent differences in behavioral and physiological responses among individuals to a changing/challenging environment, named “coping style”, “temperament” or...

  18. Comparing the predictive validity of behavioral codings and behavioral ratings in a working-dog breeding program

    Contributor(s):: McGarrity, Monica E., Sinn, David L., Thomas, Scott G., Marti, C. Nathan, Gosling, Samuel D.

    Most working-dog breeding programs have a substantial interest in using behavioral assessments of their young dogs to predict their subsequent success. Different methods of measuring behavior may capture different aspects of behavior yet working-dog programs typically use only a single...

  19. Is wheel running a re-directed stereotypic behaviour in striped mice Rhabdomys dilectus?

    Contributor(s):: Joshi, Sneha, Pillay, Neville

    When given the opportunity, many captive animal species make use of a running wheel. Wheel running is often used as an environmental enrichment to increase general locomotor activities. Yet, it is still debated whether wheel running is an enrichment or a stereotypic behaviour. Here, we...

  20. Owner personality and the wellbeing of their cats share parallels with the parent-child relationship

    Contributor(s):: Finka, L. R., Ward, J., Farnworth, M. J., Mills, D. S.