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  1. The Effects of Pet Dog-Assisted Activities on Self-Esteem, Depression and Cognitive Function among Elderly People

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Esther Shin, Sung-Kook Lee

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pet dog-assisted activities on self-esteem, depression and cognitive function of elderly people Method: The experimental group(pet dog-assisted group) consisted of 22 people over 65 years old out of about 90 elderly people...

  2. Development of Desirable Behaviors in Dog-Assisted Interventions

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Acebes, F., Pellitero, J. L., Muñiz-Diez, C., Loy, I.

    Dog-assisted interventions (DAI) are those that include specially trained dogs in human health services. Often, the training methods employed to train animals for DAI are transmitted between trainers, so the latest scientific research on dog learning and cognition is not always taken into...

  3. Novel Diagnostic Tools for Identifying Cognitive Impairment in Dogs: Behavior, Biomarkers, and Pathology

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Zuzana Vikartovska, Jana Farbakova, Tomas Smolek, Jozef Hanes, Norbert Zilka, Lubica Hornakova, Filip Humenik, Marcela Maloveska, Nikola Hudakova, Dasa Cizkova

    Canine cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CCDS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in senior dogs that is mainly associated with decreased ability to learn and respond to stimuli. It is commonly under-diagnosed because behavioral changes are often attributed to the natural process of...

  4. Weber's Law and the Scalar Property of Timing: A Test of Canine Timing

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jessica H. Cliff, Surrey M. K. Jackson, James S. McEwan, Lewis A. Bizo

    Domestic dogs completed a temporal bisection procedure that required a response to one lever following a light stimulus of short duration and to another lever following a light stimulus of a longer duration. The short and long durations across the four conditions were (0.5–2.0 s,...

  5. Animal cognition in a more than human world

    | Contributor(s):: Flynn, P.

    2020 419-422 9781946483201 North American Veterinary Community (NAVC) Orlando, English Human-Animal Bond Association Clearwater, Florida, USA. text

  6. Dogs consciously experience emotions: The question is, which?.

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ralph Adolphs

    I discuss three themes related to Kujala’s target article. First, the wealth of emerging data on cognitive studies in dogs will surely show that dogs have a very rich repertoire of cognitive processes, for most of which we find homologues in humans. Second, understanding the internal...

  7. Positive emotions and quality of life in dogs

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Patrizia Piotti

    Positive affect is fundamental to ensuring good animal welfare. Discrete and dimensional theories of emotion have recently been used to explore the relation between cognition and affect and to develop cognitive measures of positive affect. Human quality-of-life assessment focuses on positive...

  8. Two assays of working memory in companion dogs: The holeboard and disappearing object tasks

    | Contributor(s):: Smith, Melissa, Murrell, Joanna C., Mendl, Michael

  9. Dances with dogs: interspecies play and a case for sympoietic enactivism

    | Contributor(s):: Merritt, M.

  10. The Role of Pets in Supporting Cognitive-Behavioral Chronic Pain Self-Management: Perspectives of Older Adults

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Janevic, Mary R., Shute, Varick, Connell, Cathleen M., Piette, John D., Goesling, Jenna, Fynke, Julie

    Cognitive-behavioral self-management strategies are recommended for older adults with chronic pain. The goal of this study was to explore how pet ownership promotes use of these strategies in everyday life. We conducted four focus groups (N = 25) with dog and cat owners aged ≥70 years with...

  11. Auditory–Visual Matching of Conspecifics and Non-Conspecifics by Dogs and Human Infants

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Anna Gergely, Eszter Petró, Katalin Oláh, József Topál

    We tested whether dogs and 14–16-month-old infants are able to integrate intersensory information when presented with conspecific and heterospecific faces and vocalisations. The looking behaviour of dogs and infants was recorded with a non-invasive eye-tracking technique while they were...

  12. Emotion in dogs: Translational and transformative aspects

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Silvan R Urfer

    Kujala (2017) provides an excellent overview of most aspects of emotion in dogs; however, she does not cover a few fields of research that I think are also relevant to the topic. In this commentary, I discuss the current state of our knowledge regarding cognitive decline and behavioral...

  13. Dogs (Canis familiaris) recognise our faces in photographs: implications for existing and future research

    | Contributor(s):: Eatherington, C. J., Mongillo, P., Looke, M., Marinelli, L.

  14. Dogs & Society: Anglo-American Sociological Perspectives (1865-1934)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Michael R. Hill, Mary Jo Deegan

    HUMANS AND DOGS have a long, wonderful and sometimes problematic association. At a personal level, dogs have been integral to our lives, and our parents’ lives, for as long as the two of us can remember. As sociologists, we also recognize that dogs are important at the macro level. Here,...

  15. Does Physical Contact with a Dog or Person Affect Performance of a Working Memory Task?

    | Contributor(s):: Gee, Nancy R., Friedmann, Erika, Coglitore, Victoria, Fisk, Amy, Stendahl, Marcus

    Working memory (WM) plays a critical role in the execution of a wide variety of cognitive tasks and predicts academic success. This study was designed to compare the impact of the presence of a dog or a person, and physical contact with them, on the performance of a WM task. It also exam- ined...

  16. Behavioral differences among breeds of domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris): Current status of the science

    | Contributor(s):: Mehrkam, Lindsay R., Wynne, Clive D. L.

    In both popular media and scientific literature, it is commonly stated that breeds of dogs differ behaviorally in substantial, consistent and predictable ways. Since the mid-twentieth century, scientists have asked whether meaningful behavioral differences exist between breeds of dogs. Today,...

  17. Using judgement bias to measure positive affective state in dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Burman, Oliver, McGowan, Ragen, Mendl, Michael, Norling, Yezica, Paul, Elizabeth, Rehn, Therese, Keeling, Linda

    Interest in the induction and measurement of positive affective states in non-human animals is increasing. Here, we used a test of cognitive (judgement) bias, based on the finding that individuals experiencing different affective states judge ambiguous stimuli differently, to measure whether a...

  18. Animal-assisted therapy for dementia

    | Contributor(s):: Lai, N. M., Chang, S. M. W., Ng, S. S., Tan, S. L., Chaiyakunapruk, N., Stanaway, F.

    BACKGROUND: Dementia is a chronic condition which progressively affects memory and other cognitive functions, social behaviour, and ability to carry out daily activities. To date, no treatment is clearly effective in preventing progression of the disease, and most treatments are symptomatic,...

  19. The effect of age, sex and gonadectomy on dogs’ use of spatial navigation strategies

    | Contributor(s):: Scandurra, Anna, Marinelli, Lieta, Lõoke, Miina, D’Aniello, Biagio, Mongillo, Paolo

    In this study we assessed the effect of sex and gonadectomy on the type of spatial strategy (allocentric or egocentric) preferentially used by dogs in the acquisition of a navigation task and their ability to resort to the non-preferred strategy. Fifty-six dogs were involved in the study, divided...

  20. Inhibitory control – Important trait for explosive detection performance in police dogs?

    | Contributor(s):: Tiira, Katriina, Tikkanen, Antti, Vainio, Outi

    Working dogs are used for a range of important operational tasks. Identifying potentially successful working dogs as early as possible is important as rejection rates are high and training is costly. Earlier research has mainly concentrated on personality traits such as boldness, and there is...