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Tags: Deviant behavior + Animal welfare

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  1. Behavioral abnormalities in captive nonhuman primates

    Contributor(s):: Avanti, Mallapur, Choudhury, B. C.

    In this study, we dealt with 11 species of non-human primates across 10 zoos in India. We recorded behaviour as instantaneous scans between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. In the study, we segregated behaviours for analyses into abnormal, undesirable, active, and resting. The 4 types of abnormal behaviour...

  2. Combination therapy reduces self-injurious behavior in a chimpanzee ( Pan troglodytes troglodytes ): a case report

    Contributor(s):: Bourgeois, S. R., Vazquez, M., Brasky, K.

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) remains a severe and intractable abnormal behavior for nonhuman primates in diverse settings and is a significant concern for veterinarians and behavioral scientists. To date, no single pharmacological, behavioral, social, or environmental intervention method has...

  3. Comparison of remote versus in-person behavioral consultation for treatment of canine separation anxiety

    Contributor(s):: Cottam, N., Dodman, N. H., Moon-Fanelli, A. A., Patronek, G. J.

    To investigate the validity of remote consultation for treatment of canine separation anxiety, this study compared the efficacy of 2 types of behavioral services offered by Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine (TCSVM): (a) "PetFax," a remote consultation service in which dog caregivers...

  4. Distressed animal behaviors and some recommendations for improvements at the Kuala Lumpur Zoo, Malaysia

    Contributor(s):: Amber, Haque

    The artificial living conditions of captive animals present numerous challenges for animal caretakers. In this study I explored abnormal behaviors in certain caged animals at the Kuala Lumpur Zoo. Findings obtained from observations of animals and interviews of the zoo staff are followed by...

  5. Frustrated appetitive foraging behavior, stereotypic pacing, and fecal glucocorticoid levels in snow leopards ( Uncia uncia ) in the Zurich Zoo

    Contributor(s):: Burgener, N., Gusset, M., Schmid, H.

    This study hypothesized that permanently frustrated, appetitive-foraging behavior caused the stereotypic pacing regularly observed in captive carnivores. Using 2 adult female snow leopards (U), solitarily housed in the Zurich Zoo, the study tested this hypothesis experimentally with a novel...

  6. Pair housing for female longtailed and rhesus macaques in the laboratory: behavior in protected contact versus full contact

    Contributor(s):: Baker, K. C., Crockett, C. M., Lee, G. H., Oettinger, B. C., Schoof, V., Thom, J. P.

    Pair housing for caged macaques in the laboratory generally allows unrestricted tactile contact but, less commonly, may involve limited contact via grooming-contact bars or perforated panels. The purpose of using this protected contact housing, which prevents entry into pair-mates' cages,...

  7. Pet owners' views of pet behavior problems and willingness to consult experts for assistance

    Contributor(s):: Shore, E. R., Burdsal, C., Douglas, D. K.

    Prior research has found that dog obedience training and the receipt of advice regarding companion animal (pet) behavior reduce the risk of nonhuman animal relinquishment to an animal shelter and increase human-companion animal interactions, but research also finds that only a minority of pet...

  8. Self-biting in caged macaques: cause, effect, and treatment

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V., Rossell, M.

    Injurious self-biting is one of the most serious problems in primate colonies (Niemeyer, Gray, & Stephen, 1996). "Approximately 10% of captive, individually-housed monkeys engage in the disturbing phenomenon of self-injurious behavior (SIB). To date, no adequate explanation or effective therapy...

  9. Comparing the relative benefits of grooming-contact and full-contact pairing for laboratory-housed adult female Macaca fascicularis. (Special Issue: The welfare of laboratory primates.)

    Contributor(s):: Lee, G. H., Thom, J. P., Chu, K. L., Crockett, C. M.

  10. Regurgitation and reingestion in bonobos (Pan paniscus): relationships between abnormal and social behavior

    Contributor(s):: Miller, L. J., Tobey, J. R.

  11. Use of video system and its effects on abnormal behaviour in captive Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata)

    Contributor(s):: Ogura, T.

  12. Emotional stress release - a therapy option for atopy in dogs

    Contributor(s):: Luder, A.

    The emotional stress release is a creative and effective treatment option. Here in particular the interaction between man and animal will be identified to detect and to discuss possible projections of the keeper on the animal. The ESR is a methodology that is used for animals with recurrent...

  13. A case control study of on-farm risk factors for tail biting in pigs

    Contributor(s):: Moinard, C., Mendl, M., Nicol, C. J., Green, L. E.

  14. Behavioural and physiological responses of horses to initial training: the comparison between pastured versus stalled horses

    Contributor(s):: Rivera, E., Benjamin, S., Nielsen, B., Shelle, J., Zanella, A. J.

    Horses kept in stalls are deprived of opportunities for social interactions, and the performance of natural behaviour is limited. Inadequate environmental conditions may compromise behavioural development. Initial training is a complex process and it is likely that the responses of horses may be...

  15. Behavioural effects of environmental enrichment for individually caged rabbits

    Contributor(s):: Lidfors, L.

    The behavioural effects of providing 60 male New Zealand laboratory rabbits with one of four objects in their individual cages as environmental enrichment were investigated. The rabbits were assigned to one of 5 treatments by a random procedure; hay in a water bottle, grass-cubes, two gnawing...

  16. Canine fears and phobias; a regime for treatment without recourse to drugs

    Contributor(s):: Rogerson, J.

    From a study of 247 (102 male dogs and 145 bitches) case histories presenting varying degrees of fear and phobia, both generalised and specific, it has been possible to define standard patterns of behaviour. This was done on the basis of severity of the fear, the type of fear response displayed...

  17. Development of stereotypies and polydipsia in wild caught bank voles ( Clethrionomys glareolus ) and their laboratory-bred offspring. Is polydipsia a symptom of diabetes mellitus?

    Contributor(s):: Schoenecker, B., Heller, K. E., Freimanis, T.

    The development of stereotypies and polydipsia was studied in wild caught bank voles (P: n=92) and their laboratory-bred offspring (F1: n=248). All animals were kept isolated in barren cages in the laboratory. In the P generation, no individuals developed stereotypies, but 22% developed...

  18. Divergent selection on feather pecking behaviour in laying hens ( Gallus gallus domesticus )

    Contributor(s):: Kjaer, J. B., Sorensen, P., Su, G.

    A selection experiment was initiated in 1996 in which selection for (HP line) and against (LP line) feather pecking was performed. The foundation stock was a White Leghorn layer strain established in 1970 and maintained since then as a random bred control line at the Institute. Six hatches were...

  19. Geophagia in horses: a short note on 13 cases

    Contributor(s):: McGreevy, P. D., Hawson, L. A., Habermann, T. C., Cattle, S. R.

    Recorded in several species including humans, geophagia or soil eating has been observed in both wild and domesticated horses and has generally been regarded as an indication of nutritional deficiency or "boredom". Studies of soils consumed by different species have led to several theories as to...

  20. Indication of a genetic basis of stereotypies in laboratory-bred bank voles ( Clethrionomys glareolus )

    Contributor(s):: Schoenecker, B., Heller, K. E.

    The development of stereotypies was studied in 2 successive laboratory-bred generations of bank voles representing F1 (n=248) and F2 (n=270) of an originally wild caught stock. It was shown that the propensity to develop stereotypies under barren housing conditions strongly relates to the same...