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  1. Do we understand what it means for dogs to experience emotion?

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lasana T. Harris

    Psychologists who study humans struggle to agree on a definition of emotion, falling primarily into two camps. Though recent neuroscience advances are beginning to settle this ancient debate, it cannot solve the private-language problem at the heart of inferences about social cognition. This...

  2. Assistance, service, emotional support, and therapy dogs

    | Contributor(s):: McMichael, M. A., Singletary, M.

  3. Animal cognition in a more than human world

    | Contributor(s):: Flynn, P.

    2020419-4229781946483201North American Veterinary Community (NAVC)Orlando,EnglishHuman-Animal Bond Association Clearwater, Florida, USA.text

  4. Who are you, really? Unlocking the key to what makes that dog tick

    | Contributor(s):: Brophey, K., Dale, S.

    2020410-4139781946483201North American Veterinary Community (NAVC)Orlando,EnglishThe Dog Door Behavior Center Asheville, North Carolina, USA.text

  5. Canine-assisted occupational therapy for children on the autism spectrum: Parents' perspectives

    | Contributor(s):: Hill, J. R., Ziviani, J., Driscoll, C.

  6. Dog tales: mindful Dog Interactions evoke similar experiences to Dog Assisted Mindfulness meditations

    | Contributor(s):: Oliva, J. L., Green, T. R.

  7. The psychosocial influence of companion animals on positive and negative affect during the COVID-19 pandemic

    | Contributor(s):: Kogan, L. R., Currin-McCulloch, J., Bussolari, C., Packman, W., Erdman, P.

  8. "Don't bring me a dog...I'll just keep it": understanding unplanned dog acquisitions amongst a sample of dog owners attending canine health and welfare community events in the United Kingdom

    | Contributor(s):: Holland, K. E., Mead, R., Casey, R. A., Upjohn, M. M., Christley, R. M.

  9. Animal and human emotion: Concepts and methodologies

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Cátia Correia Caeiro

    The human-dog relationship is particularly interesting for the study of emotions. The underlying concepts need to be made explicit and methods need to be adapted to the characteristics of the species studied as well as the shortcomings of the human experimenter’s perception.

  10. Non-invasive Assessment of Fecal Stress Biomarkers in Hunting Dogs During Exercise and at Rest

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Augusta Zannoni, Marco Pietra, Alba Gaspardo, Pier Attilio Accorsi, Monica Barone, Silvia Turroni, Luca Laghi, Chenglin Zhu, Patrizia Brigidi, Monica Forni

    Intense exercise causes to organisms to have oxidative stress and inflammation at the gastrointestinal (GI) level. The reduction in intestinal blood flow and the exercise-linked thermal damage to the intestinal mucosa can cause intestinal barrier disruption, followed by an inflammatory...

  11. Communicating canine and human emotions

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Juliane Bräuer, Karine Silva, Stefan R. Schweinberger

    Kujala (2017) reviews a topic of major relevance for the understanding of the special dog-human relationship: canine emotions (as seen through human social cognition). This commentary draws attention to the communication of emotions within such a particular social context. It highlights...

  12. Dogs consciously experience emotions: The question is, which?.

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ralph Adolphs

    I discuss three themes related to Kujala’s target article. First, the wealth of emerging data on cognitive studies in dogs will surely show that dogs have a very rich repertoire of cognitive processes, for most of which we find homologues in humans. Second, understanding the internal...

  13. Positive emotions and quality of life in dogs

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Patrizia Piotti

    Positive affect is fundamental to ensuring good animal welfare. Discrete and dimensional theories of emotion have recently been used to explore the relation between cognition and affect and to develop cognitive measures of positive affect. Human quality-of-life assessment focuses on positive...

  14. Studying dog emotion beyond expression and without concern for feeling

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Peter F. Cook

    Studies of dog emotion have focused on the expression of social emotion, either because this is taken to suggest human-like feeling states in dogs or because it has been the most accessible signal of dog emotional processing. I argue for an approach grounded in affective neuroscience, relying...

  15. An Animal-Assisted Education Intervention with Dogs to Promote Emotion Comprehension in Primary School Children-The Federico II Model of Healthcare Zooanthropology

    | Contributor(s):: Scandurra, C., Santaniello, A., Cristiano, S., Mezza, F., Garzillo, S., Pizzo, R., Menna, L. F., Bochicchio, V.

  16. The Canine Frustration Questionnaire—Development of a New Psychometric Tool for Measuring Frustration in Domestic Dogs (Canis familiaris)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kevin J. McPeake, Lisa M. Collins, Helen Zulch, Daniel S. Mills

    Introduction: Psychometric tools have been developed for the assessment of behavioral and affective traits in non-human animals. Frustration can be defined as an emotional reaction experienced after a given expectation is violated. Frustration is a negative emotional state and whilst it...

  17. Parallels in the interactive effect of highly sensitive personality and social factors on behaviour problems in dogs and humans

    | Contributor(s):: Bräm Dubé, M., Asher, L., Würbel, H., Riemer, S., Melotti, L.

  18. The ability to recognize dog emotions depends on the cultural milieu in which we grow up

    | Contributor(s):: Amici, F., Waterman, J., Kellermann, C. M., Karimullah, K., Bräuer, J.

  19. Balancing skill against difficulty - behavior, heart rate and heart rate variability of shelter dogs during two different introductions of an interactive game

    | Contributor(s):: Arhant, Christine, Altrichter, Bernadette, Lehenbauer, Sandra, Waiblinger, Susanne, Schmied-Wagner, Claudia, Yee, Jason

    Interactive games may boost positive well-being by combining the benefits of rewards with cognitive and social enrichment. However, a hasty introduction can lead to low success and frustration. We examine two methods of introducing an interactive game to dogs to test whether they elicit...

  20. Pets Are Associated with Fewer Peer Problems and Emotional Symptoms, and Better Prosocial Behavior: Findings from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

    | Contributor(s):: Christian, H., Mitrou, F., Cunneen, R., Zubrick, S. R.