You are here: Home / Tags / Evolution + Animal behavior / All Categories

Tags: Evolution + Animal behavior

All Categories (1-20 of 39)

  1. The Dog, the Scientist's best friend: Per Jensen at TEDxNorrkoping

    Contributor(s):: Per Jensen

    This talk deals with the evolution and development of the dog and the basic aspects of dog behavior and its connection to genetics and comparison with human behaviour. A dog can learn to count, and to distinguish verbs from adjectives. It is clear that dogs understand humans much better than has...

  2. Coping strategies in captive capuchin monkeys ( Sapajus spp.)

    Contributor(s):: Ferreira, R. G., Mendl, M., Wagner, P. G. C., Araujo, T., Nunes, D., Mafra, A. L.

    Studies on diverse species indicate the existence of individual differences in stress coping strategies labelled as 'proactive' and 'reactive'. Identifying taxonomic distribution of such coping strategies is fundamental to evolutionary models and to management of captive animals. Capuchin monkeys...

  3. Como piensan los animales: Alex Kacelnik at TEDxPuraVida

    Contributor(s):: Alex Kacelnik

    His interest is to understand animal behavior in light of the ecological problems that evolution presents species in their natural circumstancesAlex Kacelnik is Professor of Behavioral Ecology at the University of Oxford , UK.His interest is to understand animal behavior in light of the...

  4. Dog Behavior: An Evolutionary Perspective

    Contributor(s):: Laura Noel

    The behavior of the modern domesticated dog is heavily influenced in its evolutionary history. I studied the evolution of the domestic dog from its origins and applied this evolutionary history to understanding the behavior of domestic dogs, and how it differs from undomesticated canine species....

  5. Social support does not require attachment: any conspecific tranquilizes isolated guinea-pig pups

    Contributor(s):: Tokumaru, R. S., Ades, C., Monticelli, P. F.

    Guinea pig pups produce typical distress whistles when isolated. Whistles' frequency is decreased or abolished when they contact with the mother and, to a lesser degree, a sibling or even an unfamiliar female, is regained. Those non-aggressive companions were considered social support providers...

  6. Evaluation of environmental and intrinsic factors that contribute to stereotypic behavior in captive rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta)

    Contributor(s):: Gottlieb, D. H., Maier, A., Coleman, K.

    Full body repetitive behaviors, known as motor stereotypic behaviors (MSBs), are one of the most commonly seen abnormal behaviors in captive non-human primates, and are frequently used as a behavioral measure of well-being. The main goal of this paper was to examine the role of environmental...

  7. Comparative study of trophic behaviour and herd structure in wild and feral goats living in a Mediterranean island: management implications

    Contributor(s):: Rivera-Sanchez, L., Cassinello Roldan, J., Baraza Ruiz, E., BartolomeFilella, J.

    The aim of this study was to compare the trophic behaviour and the social structure of Majorcan wild goats and feral goats present in the island of Majorca. The former are descendants of an ancestral goat ecotype introduced in the island in the late Neolithic, whereas feral goats come from...

  8. Domestication effects on behavioural traits and learning performance: comparing wild cavies to guinea pigs

    Contributor(s):: Brust, V., Guenther, A.

    The domestication process leads to a change in behavioural traits, usually towards individuals that are less attentive to changes in their environment and less aggressive. Empirical evidence for a difference in cognitive performance, however, is scarce. Recently, a functional linkage between an...

  9. May 08 2014

    2014 Ontario Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution Colloquium (OE3C)

    The Ontario Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution Colloquium (OE3C) is a graduate student-run conference with a broad focus on topics in ecology, human and animal behaviour, and evolution. Registration...

    https://habricentral.org/events/details/218

  10. Choosing between the emotional dog and the rational pal: a moral dilemma with a tail

    Contributor(s):: Topolski, R., Weaver, J. N., Martin, Z., McCoy, J.

  11. Teaching the dog and learning from the dog: interactivity in herding dog training and use

    Contributor(s):: Savalois, N., Lescureux, N., Brunois, F.

  12. The status of instrument development in the human-animal interaction field

    Contributor(s):: Wilson, C. C., Netting, F. E.

  13. Created from animals : the moral implications of Darwinism

    Contributor(s):: Rachels, James

  14. The evolution of imitation: what do the capacities of non-human animals tell us about the mechanisms of imitation? (Special Issue: Evolution, development and intentional control of imitation.)

    Contributor(s):: Huber, L., Range, F., Voelkl, B., Szucsich, A., Viranyi, Z., Miklosi, A.

    In this paper, we review reports and present new empirical data from studies with marmosets and dogs that address the correspondence problem of imitation research. We focus on the question of how it is possible to transform visual information into matching motor acts. Here, the important issue is...

  15. Animal welfare: should we change housing to better accommodate the animal or change the animal to accommodate the housing?

    Contributor(s):: Cheng, Heng-Wei

    Animal welfare (well-being) can be generally defined as 'a state of harmony between the animal and its environment, characterized by optimal physical, behavioural and psychological functioning and high quality of the animal's life'. Since its inception in the early nineteenth century, through...

  16. Do the stereotypies of pigs, chickens and mink reflect adaptive species differences in the control of foraging?

    Contributor(s):: Mason, G., Mendl, M.

    Species differences in food-related stereotypies and natural foraging behaviour are discussed, and evolutionary explanations for these species differences, and reasons why apparent species differences in stereotypy may be artefacts of husbandry are postulated.

  17. Animal pleasure and its moral significance. (Special Issue: Animal suffering and welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Balcombe, J.

    This paper presents arguments for, and evidence in support of, the important role of pleasure in animals' lives, and outlines its considerable significance to humankind's relationship to other animals. In the realms of animal sentience, almost all scholarly discussion revolves around its negative...

  18. Does environmental enrichment affect the behaviour of fish commonly used in laboratory work? (Special Issue: Animal suffering and welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Brydges, N. M., Braithwaite, V. A.

    Housing conditions can have significant effects on the behaviour and physiology of captive animals. Enriching barren environments, for example by providing structural complexity or companionship, are generally considered beneficial as they can decrease the occurrence of abnormal behaviours and...

  19. Genetics and genomics of animal behaviour and welfare - challenges and possibilities. (Special Issue: Farm animal welfare since the Brambell report.)

    Contributor(s):: Jensen, P., Buitenhuis, B., Kjaer, J., Zanella, A., Mormede, P., Pizzari, T.

    Traditionally, the contribution of applied ethology to animal welfare science has concentrated on understanding the reactions of animals to their housing conditions. Domestication has had small effects on fundamental aspects of animal behaviour, and therefore, the needs of present day...

  20. Fairness and other-regarding preferences in nonhuman primates

    Contributor(s):: Brosnan, Sarah F.