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  1. Our co-evolution with dogs | Karen Becker | TEDxMexicoCitySalon

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Karen Becker

    Karen Shaw Becker is the most followed veterinarian in the world, and for good reason. Dr Becker believes in a deliberate, common sense approach to creating and maintaining vibrant health for companion animals and an unconventional, integrative approach to addressing disease and re-establishing...

  2. Hond & liefde: De unieke band tussen baasje en beest

    | Contributor(s):: Roos Vonk

    Mens en hond zijn al zo lang samen dat ze elkaar veel beter aanvoelen dan anderesoorten. Hoogleraar psychologie Roos Vonk, die zelf de bank deelt met tweeviervoeters, over onze unieke ‘co-evolutie’.

  3. Companion animals as being-objects: the role of the self/other binary in the human-animal bond

    | Contributor(s):: Amanda Kelly Reed

    This research project is an investigation into the human-dog bond and the practice of pet adoption and pet surrender at the East Baton Rouge Parish Animal Control Center. The human-dog bond is an excellent vehicle for an investigation into how we create categories of other because it is a highly...

  4. Paws in the sand: the emergence and development of the use of canids in the funerary practice of the ancient Egyptians(ca. 5000 BC – 395 AD) : a thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy

    | Contributor(s):: Mary Louise Hartley

    This research investigates the nature and scope of the inclusion of canids/dogs in the funerary practice of the ancient Egyptians. Canids used in a mortuary context are well known, due mainly to the use of canids in the later votive context. However, the first documented evidence of actual...

  5. Experimental investigations of the impact of social influence on dog-human interactions

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Zsófia Sümegi

    There is an increasing scientific agreement that the origin of the domestic dog dates back several tens of thousands of years. In fact, the history of dog is a history of unique behaviour evolutionary process in which they have gradually become adapted to human environment and, as a result,...

  6. A 'long-fuse domestication' of the horse? Tooth shape suggests explosive change in modern breeds compared to extinct populations and living Przewalski horses

    | Contributor(s):: Krish Seetah, Andrea Cardini, Graeme Barker

    Archaeological and molecular data suggest that horses were domesticated comparatively recently, the genetic evidence indicating that this was from several maternal haplotypes but only a single paternal one. However, although central to our understanding of how humans and environmental conditions...

  7. The Dog, the Scientist's best friend: Per Jensen at TEDxNorrkoping

    | Contributor(s):: Per Jensen

    This talk deals with the evolution and development of the dog and the basic aspects of dog behavior and its connection to genetics and comparison with human behaviour. A dog can learn to count, and to distinguish verbs from adjectives. It is clear that dogs understand humans much better than has...

  8. Coping strategies in captive capuchin monkeys ( Sapajus spp.)

    | Contributor(s):: Ferreira, R. G., Mendl, M., Wagner, P. G. C., Araujo, T., Nunes, D., Mafra, A. L.

    Studies on diverse species indicate the existence of individual differences in stress coping strategies labelled as 'proactive' and 'reactive'. Identifying taxonomic distribution of such coping strategies is fundamental to evolutionary models and to management of captive animals. Capuchin monkeys...

  9. Dog Behavior: An Evolutionary Perspective

    | Contributor(s):: Laura Noel

    The behavior of the modern domesticated dog is heavily influenced in its evolutionary history. I studied the evolution of the domestic dog from its origins and applied this evolutionary history to understanding the behavior of domestic dogs, and how it differs from undomesticated canine species....

  10. Social support does not require attachment: any conspecific tranquilizes isolated guinea-pig pups

    | Contributor(s):: Tokumaru, R. S., Ades, C., Monticelli, P. F.

    Guinea pig pups produce typical distress whistles when isolated. Whistles' frequency is decreased or abolished when they contact with the mother and, to a lesser degree, a sibling or even an unfamiliar female, is regained. Those non-aggressive companions were considered social support providers...

  11. Evaluation of environmental and intrinsic factors that contribute to stereotypic behavior in captive rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta)

    | Contributor(s):: Gottlieb, D. H., Maier, A., Coleman, K.

    Full body repetitive behaviors, known as motor stereotypic behaviors (MSBs), are one of the most commonly seen abnormal behaviors in captive non-human primates, and are frequently used as a behavioral measure of well-being. The main goal of this paper was to examine the role of environmental...

  12. Converging on ancient bones: a review of the evidence for the close relatedness of humans ( Homo sapiens) and spotted hyenas ( Crocuta crocuta)

    | Contributor(s):: Baynes-Rock, M.

    The majority of spotted hyena studies are conducted in places such as national parks and reserves where there are few humans present other than the researchers. I argue that this reflects a perception that "real" hyenas are those largely unaffected by contact with humans. This is at odds with...

  13. Comparative study of trophic behaviour and herd structure in wild and feral goats living in a Mediterranean island: management implications

    | Contributor(s):: Rivera-Sanchez, L., Cassinello Roldan, J., Baraza Ruiz, E., BartolomeFilella, J.

    The aim of this study was to compare the trophic behaviour and the social structure of Majorcan wild goats and feral goats present in the island of Majorca. The former are descendants of an ancestral goat ecotype introduced in the island in the late Neolithic, whereas feral goats come from...

  14. A case for a naturalistic perspective: response to Lawrence and Bekoff

    | Contributor(s):: Paxton, D. W.

    The author responds to commentaries on his original paper noting that "The paper is about questions, not answers. The orthodoxanswer in urban animal management — responsible pet ownership — is really the target of the naturalistic perspective. The paper requests urban authorities to always ask...

  15. Paxton's panorama: naturalizing the bonds between people and dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Bekoff, M.

    The author "want[s] to point out some gray areas in Paxton’s essay where I think more fleshing out is needed, especially how hisideas relate, perhaps uniquely, to the human–dog bond."

  16. The hunter-gatherer prehistory of human-animal interactions

    | Contributor(s):: Mithen, S.

    In this paper, the author "will examine some of the key moments in the evolution of human relationships with animals, tracking the emergence of these new relationships and the impact they havehad on our bodies, our minds and our culture," particularly the more recent hunting-gatherers of...

  17. Domestication effects on behavioural traits and learning performance: comparing wild cavies to guinea pigs

    | Contributor(s):: Brust, V., Guenther, A.

    The domestication process leads to a change in behavioural traits, usually towards individuals that are less attentive to changes in their environment and less aggressive. Empirical evidence for a difference in cognitive performance, however, is scarce. Recently, a functional linkage between an...

  18. Preliminary investigation of morphological differences between ten breeds of horses suggests selection for paedomorphosis. (Special Issue: Equitation science.)

    | Contributor(s):: Goodwin, D., Levine, M., McGreevy, P. D.

    Paedomorphosis is the retention of juvenile morphology at maturity and is important in generating evolutionary change in domestic species and species in the wild. When comparing dogs with the wolf, this preliminary study saw paedomorphosis in their physical and behavioural traits (Goodwin,...

  19. Shedding ultraviolet light on welfare in laboratory rodents: suggestions for further research and refinement

    | Contributor(s):: Sorensen, D. B.

    The welfare of laboratory rats and mice is sought to be optimised through adjustment of a variety of environmental factors, including light intensity and photoperiodicity. However, the fact that rodents are able to perceive ultraviolet (UV) light tends to be ignored. The importance of being able...

  20. Common and emerging infectious diseases in the animal shelter

    | Contributor(s):: Pesavento, P. A., Murphy, B. G.

    The beneficial role that animal shelters play is unquestionable. An estimated 3 to 4 million animals are cared for or placed in homes each year, and most shelters promote public health and support responsible pet ownership. It is, nonetheless, inevitable that shelters are prime examples of...