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Tags: Foraging + Feeding behavior

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  1. Feeding, foraging, and feather pecking behaviours in precision-fed and skip-a-day-fed broiler breeder pullets

    Contributor(s):: Girard, Ms Teryn E., Zuidhof, Martin J., Bench, Clover J.

    Broiler breeder chickens are feed-restricted to control growth and maximize chick production. Feed restriction creates welfare concerns as conventional skip-a-day feeding can increase activity levels and oral stereotypies during the rearing period. A precision feeding system has been developed to...

  2. "Who's been a good dog?" - Owner perceptions and motivations for treat giving

    Contributor(s):: White, G. A., Ward, L., Pink, C., Craigon, J., Millar, K. M.

    Complex relationships commonly exist between owners and their companion animals, particularly around feeding behaviour with an owner's affection or love for their animal most pronounced through the provision of food. It is notable that the pet food market is experiencing strong year-on-year...

  3. Giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis) and humans in the lower Yasuní Basin, Ecuador : spacio-temporal activity patterns and their relevance for conservation

    Contributor(s):: Paola M. Carrera-Ubidia

    Giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis) and humans in the Lower Yasuní Basin (Ecuador) have similar food and space requirements: they consume comparable arrays of fish species, and they use similar aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Resource partitioning could facilitate coexistence by...

  4. Condensed tannins reduce browsing and increase grazing time of free-ranging goats in semi-arid savannas

    Contributor(s):: Mkhize, N. R., Heitkonig, I. M. A., Scogings, P. F., Dziba, L. E., Prins, H. H. T., Boer, W. F. de

    Tannin concentrations fluctuate spatially and temporally within and among plant species, with consequences for forage quality of herbivores. The extent to which these fluctuations influence foraging activities of goats is not fully understood. While accounting for the effects of the time of the...

  5. The effect of four different feeding regimes on rabbit behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Prebble, J. L., Langford, F. M., Shaw, D. J., Meredith, A. L.

    Dietary composition and presentation impacts on the behaviour of animals, and failure to provide a suitable diet can lead to reduced welfare through the development of poor health, the inability to express normal behaviours and the development of abnormal behaviours. This study assessed the...

  6. An automatic system to record foraging behaviour in free-ranging ruminants

    Contributor(s):: Rutter, S. M., Champion, R. A., Penning, P. D.

    Precise measurements of grazing behaviour are required to develop an understanding of the factors affecting the foraging behaviour of free-ranging domestic ruminants. An automatic, microcomputer-based system for the digital recording of the jaw movements of free-ranging cattle and sheep is...

  7. Diet preference for grass and legumes in free-ranging domestic sheep and cattle: current theory and future application

    Contributor(s):: Rutter, S. M.

    This paper reviews the current theory and potential practical applications of research on the diet preference for grass and legumes in grazing domestic sheep and cattle. Although much of this work has focussed on grass and clover as a model system, it has wider theoretical implications and...

  8. Do the stereotypies of pigs, chickens and mink reflect adaptive species differences in the control of foraging?

    Contributor(s):: Mason, G., Mendl, M.

    Species differences in food-related stereotypies and natural foraging behaviour are discussed, and evolutionary explanations for these species differences, and reasons why apparent species differences in stereotypy may be artefacts of husbandry are postulated.

  9. Feeding behaviour of sheep on shrubs in response to contrasting herbaceous cover in rangelands dominated by Cytisus scoparius L

    Contributor(s):: Pontes, L. da S., Agreil, C., Magda, D., Gleizes, B., Fritz, H.

    The foraging responses of ewes faced with a diversity of feed items and their effects on broom (Cytisus scoparius L.) consumption were examined. The experiment was conducted on a farm in the autumn with ewes (n=33) grazing three small paddocks (0.44 ha on average, for at least 10 days each)...

  10. Feeding enrichment in an opportunistic carnivore: the red fox

    Contributor(s):: Kistler, C., Hegglin, D., Wurbel, H., Konig, B.

    In captive carnivores, species-specific behaviour is often restricted by inadequate feeding regimens. Feeding live prey is not feasible in most places and food delivery is often highly predictable in space and time which is considerably different from the situation in the wild. As a result,...

  11. Influence of sward height on diet selection by horses

    Contributor(s):: Naujeck, A., Hill, J., Gibb, M. J.

    Foraging herbivores are often faced with spatial and temporal heterogeneity within the vegetation they have available to graze and therefore have to make decisions where and when to graze. The study reported in this paper investigated the influence of sward height on diet selection by horses...

  12. Intake rate during meals and meal duration for sheep in different hunger states, grazing grass or white clover swards

    Contributor(s):: Orr, R. J., Penning, P. D., Rutter, S. M., Champion, R. A., Harvey, A., Rook, A. J.

    Meal patterns and rates of feed intake by grazing herbivores may be markedly different from those found in housed ruminants and monogastrics. Cumulative intakes over the evening meal (satiety curves) were measured using groups of sheep (Ovis aries) grazing monocultures of white clover (Trifolium...

  13. Lambs fed protein or energy imbalanced diets forage in locations and on foods that rectify imbalances

    Contributor(s):: Scott, L. L., Provenza, F. D.

    Ruminants eat a variety of foods from different locations in the environment. While water, cover, social interactions, and predators are all likely to influence choice of foraging location, differences in macronutrient content among forages may also cause ruminants to forage in different...

  14. Laterality of lying behaviour in dairy cattle

    Contributor(s):: Tucker, C. B., Cox, N. R., Weary, D. M., Spinka, M.

    Dairy cattle spend, on average, between 8 and 15 h/d lying down. Our objective was to describe the laterality of lying behaviour and assess several internal and external factors that may affect laterality. Internal factors included time spent and time since eating or lying before choosing to lie...

  15. Postingestive feedback from starch influences the ingestive behaviour of sheep consuming wheat straw

    Contributor(s):: Villalba, J. J., Provenza, F. D.

    Plant species present a complex array of biochemicals to herbivores that in conjunction with a plant's physical structure influence intake. The role of postingestive feedback from macronutrients on the ingestion of a low-quality forage by sheep was investigated. The ingestive behaviour of 2...

  16. The effect of breed and housing system on dairy cow feeding and lying behaviour

    Contributor(s):: O'Driscoll, K., Boyle, L., Hanlon, A.

    In Ireland there is growing interest in managing dairy cows on out-wintering pads (OWPs) during the winter, as a low cost alternative to housing indoors. This study investigated feeding and lying behaviour of two breeds of dairy cow (Holstein-Friesian and Norwegian Red) at pasture (PAS) and in...

  17. The effect of nose rings on the exploratory behaviour of outdoor gilts exposed to different tests

    Contributor(s):: Studnitz, M., Jensen, K. H., Jorgensen, E.

    Rooting behaviour appears to be an important part of the behavioural repertoire in pigs. It is suggested that it is in fact a behavioural need. The present study investigated whether nose-ringed gilts, which are unable to root, can satisfactorily substitute rooting with other exploratory...

  18. Cattle grazing behavior with season-long free-choice access to four forage types

    Contributor(s):: Fehmi, J. S., Karn, J. F., Ries, R. E., Hendrickson, J. R., Hanson, J. D.

    This experiment investigated how season-long, free-choice grazing affected weekly cattle grazing behaviour and resource use. Our objectives were to determine if known forage preferences change through the season, if feedbacks from previous grazing intensity affect current use, and if resources...

  19. Cattle use visual cues to track food locations

    Contributor(s):: Howery, L. D., Bailey, D. W., Ruyle, G. B., Renken, W. J.

    This study tested the hypothesis that cattle aided by visual cues would be more efficient than uncued animals in locating and consuming foods placed in either fixed or variable locations within a 0.64-ha experimental pasture. Eight yearling steers were randomly selected and trained to associate...

  20. Does sward height affect feeding patch choice and voluntary intake in horses?

    Contributor(s):: Edouard, N., Fleurance, G., Dumont, B., Baumont, R., Duncan, P.

    The numbers of horses grazing at pasture are increasing in developed countries, so a proper understanding of their feeding selectivity and of the tactics they use for extracting nutrients from swards is essential for the management of horses and grasslands. Resource acquisition in herbivores can...