You are here: Home / Tags / Horses + Behavior and behavior mechanisms / All Categories

Tags: Horses + Behavior and behavior mechanisms

All Categories (1-20 of 164)

  1. The Impact of Equine-Assisted Therapy on Equine Behavioral and Physiological Responses

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Tiago Mendonça, Cécile Bienboire-Frosini, Fanny Menuge, Julien Leclercq, Céline Lafont-Lecuelle, Sana Arroub, Patrick Pageat

    Equine-assisted therapies (EATs) have been widely used in the treatment of patients with mental or physical conditions. However, studies on the influence of equine-assisted therapy (EAT) on equine welfare are very recent, and the need for further research is often highlighted. The aim of this...

  2. Physiological and Behavioral Responses of Horses to Wither Scratching and Patting the Neck When Under Saddle

    | Contributor(s):: Thorbergson, Zoë W., Nielsen, Sharon G., Beaulieu, Rodney J., Doyle, Rebecca E.

    Riding is considered to be an arousing activity for horses. It has been suggested that wither scratching may be a more useful tool for relaxation compared with the common practice of neck patting. In the current study, 18 horses were exposed to 3 treatments, including control or no interaction,...

  3. The Effect of an Irregular Feeding Schedule on Equine Behavior

    | Contributor(s):: Zupan, Manja, Štuhec, Ivan, Jordan, Dušanka

    We used eight horses 1 to 12 years old to investigate the influence of irregular feeding times on the behavior. The animals were housed in individual boxes, fed with hay ad libitum and barley-oat mixture at three set times; 05:00 (earlier feeding) on Thursdays, 07:00 (delayed feeding) on...

  4. The Anthropomorphic Application of Gender Stereotypes to Horses

    | Contributor(s):: Dashper, Katherine, Fenner, Kate, Hyde, Michelle, Probyn-Rapsey, Fiona, Caspar, Georgie, Henshall, Cathrynne, McGreevy, Paul

    Gender stereotypes shape human social interaction, often to the detriment of women and those who do not comply with normative expectations of gender. So far, little research has assessed the extent to which people apply gender stereotypes to animals, and the implications this may have for...

  5. An objective measure of reactive behaviour in horses

    | Contributor(s):: Noble, Glenys K., Blackshaw, Kathryn L., Cowling, Ann, Harris, Patricia A., Sillence, Martin N.

    Several tests have been devised in an attempt to detect behaviour modification due to training, supplements or diet in horses. These tests rely on subjective observations in combination with physiological measures, such as heart rate (HR) and plasma cortisol concentrations, but these measures do...

  6. The enriching effect of non-commercial items in stabled horses

    | Contributor(s):: Bulens, Anneleen, Van Beirendonck, Sanne, Van Thielen, Jos, Driessen, Bert

    The effect of the provision of simple objects to stabled horses on their behaviour was investigated to determine whether these objects can affect horses’ behaviour in a positive way and thus enrich their environment. A positive influence can for example be measured by a decrease in stereotypical...

  7. Crib-biting and its heritability in Finnhorses

    | Contributor(s):: Hemmann, Karin, Raekallio, Marja, Vainio, Outi, Juga, Jarmo

    Crib-biting in horses is a stereotypical oral behaviour with a prevalence of 2.8–15%, varying between breeds. A genetic basis for crib-biting has been suggested by many researchers, but due to incomplete information on families or the lack of a sufficient number of verified crib-biters,...

  8. Application of Qualitative Behavioural Assessment to horses during an endurance ride

    | Contributor(s):: Fleming, Patricia A., Paisley, Cheree L., Barnes, Anne L., Wemelsfelder, Françoise

    Endurance horses are considered subject to a unique set of training and competing pressures due to the long distances travelled. The health and welfare of these horses could be compromised if they have not been adequately trained or are pushed beyond their limits, and there are increasing...

  9. Towards a more objective assessment of equine personality using behavioural and physiological observations from performance test training

    | Contributor(s):: König von Borstel, Uta, Pasing, Stephanie, Gauly, Matthias

    Current definitions of horse personality traits are rather vague, lacking clear, universally accepted guidelines for evaluation in performance tests. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to screen behavioural and physiological measurements taken during riding for potential links with...

  10. Keeping horses in groups: A review

    | Contributor(s):: Hartmann, Elke, Søndergaard, Eva, Keeling, Linda J.

    Although husbandry conditions for horses have improved over the last decades, many horses are still kept singly with limited or no physical contact to other horses. This is surprising, given the fact that keeping horses in groups is recognised best to fulfil their physical and behavioural needs,...

  11. Effects of enrichment items on activity and social interactions in domestic horses (Equus caballus)

    | Contributor(s):: Jørgensen, Grete Helen Meisfjord, Liestøl, Silje Hanche-Olsen, Bøe, Knut Egil

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of items intended to provide enrichment during turnout, both for individual and group kept horses in an attempt to reduce the amount of passive behaviours. The study was divided into two parts, where study 1 involved eight horses rotated through...

  12. Behaviour and stress responses in horses with gastric ulceration

    | Contributor(s):: Malmkvist, Jens, Poulsen, Janne Møller, Luthersson, Nanna, Palme, Rupert, Christensen, Janne Winther, Søndergaard, Eva

    Only little is known about behaviour and stress responses in horses with gastric ulceration, despite the high prevalence of this condition. Our objectives in the present study was to (i) describe the severity of gastric ulceration in horses, housed under relatively standardised conditions, and...

  13. Adolescents' Affective and Physiological Regulation Shape Negative Behavior During Challenging Equine Assisted Learning Activities

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Patricia Pendry, Alexa M. Carr, Jaymie L. Vandagriff

    This study examined associations between adolescents’ (N = 59; M age = 11.63) diurnal and momentary activity of the Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal (HPA) axis as marked by salivary cortisol, and affective and behavioral responses to their first, mounted equine assisted learning (EAL)...

  14. Influence of age and experience rider on differentiate the behaviour of recreational horses being prepared for use

    | Contributor(s):: Jastrzebska, E., Wilk, I.

  15. Qualitative Behaviour Assessment of horses exposed to short-term emotional treatments

    | Contributor(s):: Hintze, Sara, Murphy, Eimear, Bachmann, Iris, Wemelsfelder, Francoise, Würbel, Hanno

    Assessing emotion in animals is fundamental to the study of animal welfare with methodologies for reliable and valid assessments being highly desirable. Qualitative Behaviour Assessment (QBA) is based on the assumption that human observers are capable of integrating details of animals’...

  16. Longitudinal study on human-related behaviour in horses—Can horses (Equus caballus) be de-domesticated?

    | Contributor(s):: Górecka-Bruzda, Aleksandra, Jaworski, Zbigniew, Suwała, Mira, Boroń, Marlena, Ogłuszka, Magdalena, Earley, Bernadette, Sobczyńska, Magdalena

    In the present study, we hypothesise that persistent avoidance of human would confirm de-domestication process in semi-feral horses. Fifty-three Konik polski horses (stable-born: SB, N1=27 and forest-born: FB, N2=26), additionally handled for 5 or 15days after weaning, were evaluated. Human...

  17. Indicators of stress in equitation

    | Contributor(s):: König v. Borstel, U., Visser, E. K., Hall, C.

    Stress is a generic concept describing the body’s reaction to external stimuli, including both physiological and psychological factors. Therefore, by definition, the assessment of psychological stress in the exercising horse encompasses the problem of teasing apart the psychological and...

  18. What we can measure, we can manage: The importance of using robust welfare indicators in Equitation Science

    | Contributor(s):: Waran, Natalie, Randle, Hayley

    Ever since the phrase, ‘the happy athlete’ was introduced into the FEI rules for dressage (Article 401.1) there have been discussions about what this actually means and whether it is possible to recognize and reward positive emotions in working horses. For those interested in the study of equine...

  19. Application of learning theory in horse rescues in England and Wales

    | Contributor(s):: Preshaw, Liane, Kirton, Roxane, Randle, Hayley

    In England and Wales the welfare of animals, including horses, is protected by the Animal Welfare Act 2006. Welfare agencies play a role in the investigation of equine welfare concerns and catching, containing, transporting and boarding (caring for) horses that have been rescued. Horses regularly...

  20. Applied neurophysiology of the horse; implications for training, husbandry and welfare

    | Contributor(s):: McBride, Sebastian D., Parker, Matthew O., Roberts, Kirsty, Hemmings, Andrew

    Understanding the neural circuits underlying equine behaviour has the potential to help optimise strategies of husbandry and training. This review discusses two areas of neurophysiological research in a range of species and relates this information to the horse. The first discussion focuses on...