The HABRI Foundation is calling for research proposals to investigate the health outcomes of pet ownership and/or animal-assisted activity or therapy, both for the people and the animals involved. To learn more, visit https://habri.org/grants/funding-opportunities/ close

 
You are here: Home / Tags / Hygiene + Humans / All Categories

Tags: Hygiene + Humans

All Categories (1-20 of 36)

  1. Practices and Perceptions of Animal Contact and Associated Health Outcomes in Pregnant Women and New Mothers

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hsin-Yi Weng, Kimberly Ankrom

    Companion animals play an important role in our society. However, pregnant women and new mothers might have specific concerns about animal-associated health outcomes because of their altered immune function and posture as well as their newborn babies. The study was conducted to collect baseline...

  2. Effects of guest feeding programs on captive giraffe behavior

    | Contributor(s):: Orban, D. A., Siegford, J. M., Snider, R. J.

    Zoological institutions develop human-animal interaction opportunities for visitors to advance missions of conservation, education, and recreation; however, the animal welfare implications largely have yet to be evaluated. This behavioral study was the first to quantify impacts of guest feeding...

  3. Social dominance and legitimizing myths about animal use

    | Contributor(s):: Jackson, L. M., Gibbings, A.

    The present study tested the hypothesis that the relation between social dominance orientation and the endorsement of legitimizing myths about the human use of nonhuman animals is moderated by the salience of that use. Eighty-two student participants read an article about agriculture that focused...

  4. Children's beliefs about animal minds (Child-BAM): associations with positive and negative child-animal interactions

    | Contributor(s):: Hawkins, R. D., Williams, J. M.

    Children and animals can have a great impact on each other's lives, yet little is known about the underpinnings of these relationships. Children's interactions with animals may be influenced by their belief in animal minds, that animals are sentient and experience thoughts and feelings. This...

  5. Social dominance and legitimizing myths about animal use

    | Contributor(s):: Jackson, L. M., Gibbings, A.

    The present study tested the hypothesis that the relation between social dominance orientation and the endorsement of legitimizing myths about the human use of nonhuman animals is moderated by the salience of that use. Eighty-two student participants read an article about agriculture that focused...

  6. Social dominance and legitimizing myths about animal use

    | Contributor(s):: Jackson, L. M., Gibbings, A.

    The present study tested the hypothesis that the relation between social dominance orientation and the endorsement of legitimizing myths about the human use of nonhuman animals is moderated by the salience of that use. Eighty-two student participants read an article about agriculture that focused...

  7. Reframing Menstruation in India: Metamorphosis of the Menstrual Taboo With the Changing Media Coverage

    | Contributor(s):: Yagnik, Arpan Shailesh

  8. Enteric pathogens of dogs and cats with public health implications

    | Contributor(s):: Kantere, M., Athanasiou, L. V., Chatzopoulos, D. C., Spyrou, V., Valiakos, G., Kontos, V., Billinis, C.

    Dogs and cats play an important role in modern society, enhancing the psychological and physiological well-being of many people. However, there are well-documented health risks associated with human animal interactions. More specifically, enteric pathogens of zoonotic risk which are transmitted...

  9. Zoonotic disease risks for immunocompromised and other high-risk clients and staff: promoting safe pet ownership and contact

    | Contributor(s):: Stull, J. W., Stevenson, K. B.

    Pets can be a source of disease (zoonoses) for humans. The disease risks associated with pet contact are highest among young children, the elderly, pregnant women, and immunocompromised hosts. These individuals and household members display limited knowledge of pet-associated disease, rarely...

  10. Zoonotic disease risks for immunocompromised and other high-risk clients and staff: promoting safe pet ownership and contact

    | Contributor(s):: Stull, J. W., Stevenson, K. B.

    Pets can be a source of disease (zoonoses) for humans. The disease risks associated with pet contact are highest among young children, the elderly, pregnant women, and immunocompromised hosts. These individuals and household members display limited knowledge of pet-associated disease, rarely...

  11. An online social network to increase walking in dog owners: a randomized trial

    | Contributor(s):: Schneider, K. L., Murphy, D., Ferrara, C., Oleski, J., Panza, E., Savage, C., Gada, K., Bozzella, B., Olendzki, E., Kern, D., Lemon, S. C.

    Purpose: Encouraging dog walking may increase physical activity in dog owners. This cluster-randomized controlled trial investigated whether a social networking Web site (Meetup TM) could be used to deliver a multicomponent dog walking intervention to increase physical activity. Methods:...

  12. Food security: one of a number of 'securities' we need for a full life: an Australian perspective

    | Contributor(s):: Farmar-Bowers, Q.

    Although agriculture in Australia is very productive, the current food supply systems in Australia fail to deliver healthy diets to all Australians and fail to protect the natural resources on which they depend. The operation of the food systems creates 'collateral damage' to the natural...

  13. The prevalence and implications of human-animal co-sleeping in an Australian sample

    | Contributor(s):: Smith, B., Thompson, K., Clarkson, L., Dawson, D.

    Sleep research is characterized by an interest in humans, with the realm of animal sleep left largely to ethologists and animal scientists. However, the lives of sleep-study participants and those with sleep problems frequently involve animals. For the majority of the population in developed...

  14. Hediger revisited: how do zoo animals see us?

    | Contributor(s):: Hosey, G.

    Contact with people, both familiar (e.g., caretakers) and unfamiliar (e.g., members of the public), is a significant part of the lives of nonhuman animals in zoos. The available empirical evidence shows that in many cases this contact represents a source of stress to the animals, although there...

  15. Owners and pets exercising together: canine response to veterinarian-prescribed physical activity

    | Contributor(s):: Byers, C. G., Wilson, C. C., Stephens, M. B., Goodie, J. L., Netting, F. E., Olsen, C. H.

    Using a prospective, randomized, single-blinded clinical design, we enrolled dog owners (DOs) and their dogs presenting to a veterinary referral hospital in a two-phase trial to determine whether veterinarian-initiated counseling increases physical activity and leads to secondary health benefits...

  16. Anxiety-reducing effect: dog, fish and plant in direct comparison

    | Contributor(s):: Buttelmann, D., Rompke, A. K.

    Animals have an anxiety-reducing effect on humans. However, in the search for which interventions are the most effective, one notices that studies in this field are not comparable as they all use different designs. Hereby, we investigated the anxiety reducing abilities of different animals and a...

  17. Pet bylaws and posthumanist health promotion: a case study of urban policy

    | Contributor(s):: Rock, M.

    Dog walking enables physical activity and positive social interactions, but uncontrolled dogs as well as dog feces can foster conflict and deter physical activity, for both dog owners and nonowners. This case study shows that previously reported associations with dogs (both positive and negative)...

  18. The impact of animal welfare advertising on opposition to the Canadian seal hunt and willingness to boycott the Canadian seafood industry

    | Contributor(s):: Braunsberger, K.

    The purpose of this research was to measure and compare the initial and carryover effects of a video advertisement developed by an animal welfare organization, namely Harpseals. org. The ad was designed to educate the public about an egregious act against wildlife (i.e., the Canadian seal hunt),...

  19. The relationship between types of human-animal interaction and attitudes about animals: an exploratory study

    | Contributor(s):: Mueller, M. K.

    Existing theory and research suggests that understanding the nuances of particular instantiations of human-animal relationships is important in promoting positive, mutually beneficial relationships between people and animals. One such aspect of human-animal interaction (HAI) involves species of...

  20. Attitudes of dairy farmers toward cow welfare in relation to housing, management and productivity

    | Contributor(s):: Kauppinen, T., Valros, A., Vesala, K. M.