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  1. Playful handling of laboratory rats is more beneficial when applied before than after routine injections

    Contributor(s):: Cloutier, S., Wahl, K. L., Panksepp, J., Newberry, R. C.

    The ability of positive affective states to counteract negative states engendered by routine medical procedures remains poorly studied. In laboratory rats, positive affect typically associated with rough-and-tumble play can be induced through human "hand play" - the experience of being "tickled"...

  2. A tail of two monkeys: social housing for nonhuman primates in the research laboratory setting

    Contributor(s):: Seelig, D.

    Despite great adaptability, most nonhuman primates require regular tactile contact with conspecifics for their psychological well being. By illustrating the inherent value of social contact and by providing clues to the best ways of satisfying this need, behavioral studies are useful in designing...

  3. Behavioral and hormonal consequences of transporting giant pandas from China to the United States

    Contributor(s):: Snyder, R. J., Perdue, B. M., Powell, D. M., Forthman, D. L., Bloomsmith, M. A., Maple, T. L.

    Zoological institutions strive to ensure the welfare of nonhuman animals in captivity. Part of this effort involves reducing the level of distress experienced by an animal to the greatest extent possible. However, some necessary zoo management practices such as transportation induce stress...

  4. Behavioral assessment of intermittent wheel running and individual housing in mice in the laboratory

    Contributor(s):: Pham, T. M., Brene, S., Baumans, V.

    Physical cage enrichment - exercise devices for rodents in the laboratory - often includes running wheels. This study compared responses of mice in enriched physical and social conditions and in standard social conditions to wheel running, individual housing, and open-field test. The study...

  5. Bioacoustic monitoring of aggression in group-housed rhesus macaques

    Contributor(s):: McCowan, B., Rommeck, I.

    Many captive primate facilities house rhesus macaques in multimale-multifemale social groups in large enclosures that simulate the natural social and environmental features characteristic of the species, enhancing their reproductive performance as well as their psychological well-being, yet one...

  6. Combination therapy reduces self-injurious behavior in a chimpanzee ( Pan troglodytes troglodytes ): a case report

    Contributor(s):: Bourgeois, S. R., Vazquez, M., Brasky, K.

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) remains a severe and intractable abnormal behavior for nonhuman primates in diverse settings and is a significant concern for veterinarians and behavioral scientists. To date, no single pharmacological, behavioral, social, or environmental intervention method has...

  7. Do male mice prefer or avoid each other's company? Influence of hierarchy, kinship, and familiarity

    Contributor(s):: Loo, P. L. P. van, Groot, A. C. de, Zutphen, B. F. M. van, Baumans, V.

    In the laboratory, individual housing of male mice who otherwise show aggression is common practice. Because mice are a social species, the question arises whether this procedure is right from the animals' point of view. This study tested the preference of subordinate animals for their dominant...

  8. Environmental enrichment alters the behavioral profile of ratsnakes ( Elaphe )

    Contributor(s):: Almli, L. M., Burghardt, G. M.

    This study investigated the effects of environmentally enriched and standard laboratory housing conditions on behavioral performance in 16 subadult ratsnakes (Elaphe obsoleta) using a split-clutch design. In a problem-solving task, snakes housed in enriched environments (EC) exhibited shorter...

  9. Genetic engineering and other factors that might affect human-animal interactions in the research setting

    Contributor(s):: Comber, J., Griffin, G.

    Evidence exists, particularly in the welfare literature of nonhuman animals on the farm, that the interaction between nonhuman animals and the personnel who care for them can have a strong effect on the animals' behavior, productivity, and welfare. Among species commonly used for biomedical...

  10. Noise exposure, music, and animals in the laboratory: a commentary based on Laboratory Animal Refinement and Enrichment Forum (LAREF) discussions

    Contributor(s):: Patterson-Kane, E. G., Farnworth, M. J.

    The effects of noise, in general, and music, in particular, on the behavior and welfare of animals in the laboratory deserve a great deal of empirical study. However, many laboratories must develop their current practices on the basis of sparse and conflicting data. With this commentary we seek...

  11. Positive reinforcement training as a technique to alter nonhuman primate behavior: quantitative assessments of effectiveness. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Schapiro, S. J., Bloomsmith, M. A., Laule, G. E.

    Many suggest that operant conditioning techniques can be applied successfully to improve the behavioral management of nonhuman primates in research settings. However, relatively little empirical data exist to support this claim. This article is a review of several studies that discussed applied...

  12. Positive reinforcement training moderates only high levels of abnormal behavior in singly housed rhesus macaques

    Contributor(s):: Baker, K. C., Bloomsmith, M., Neu, K., Griffis, C., Maloney, M., Oettinger, B., Schoof, V. A. M., Martinez, M.

    This study evaluated the application of positive reinforcement training (PRT) as an intervention for abnormal behaviors in singly housed laboratory rhesus macaques at 2 large primate facilities. Training involved basic control behaviors and body-part presentation. The study compared baseline...

  13. Primate behavior studies: essential to primate welfare. Proceedings of the special Animal Behavior Society session, 2006

    Contributor(s):: Koch, V. W.

    This special issue contains 8 papers and 3 commentaries on the association between understanding nonhuman primate behaviour and providing for nonhuman primate welfare. The topics of the papers include: welfare of apes in captive environments; social housing for nonhuman primates in the research...

  14. Rat's demand for group size

    Contributor(s):: Patterson-Kane, E. P., Hunt, M., Harper, D.

    Social isolation compromises the welfare of rats. However, it is not clear how many rats should be housed together under laboratory conditions. Pair housing, sometimes recommended over group housing, may help avoid aggression and disease transmission. Female rats, however, showed the highest...

  15. The development of a novel form of mouse cage enrichment

    Contributor(s):: Leach, M. C., Ambrose, N., Bowell, V. J., Morton, D. B.

    This article describes the design and testing of a novel form of mouse cage enrichment. A cage insert was designed and developed to fulfill a number of enrichment goals pertaining to its effectiveness and practicality (i.e., to improve the environment of mice in laboratories while causing the...

  16. The effects of caretaker-primate relationships on primates in the laboratory

    Contributor(s):: Waitt, C., Buchanan-Smith, H. M., Morris, K.

    As contact with caretakers is likely to make up the majority of human-primate interactions in laboratories, caretakers represent an important influence in the lives of captive primates. The aim of this study was to determine how caretaker-primate relationships affected the behaviour of primates...

  17. The myth of the aggressive monkey

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V.

    Captive rhesus macaques are not naturally aggressive, but poor husbandry and handling practices can trigger their aggression toward conspecifics and toward the human handler. The myth of the aggressive monkey probably is based on often not taking into account basic ethological principles when...

  18. The physiological and behavioural impact of sensory contact among unfamiliar adult mice in the laboratory

    Contributor(s):: Rettich, A., Kasermann, H. P., Pelczar, P., Burki, K., Arras, M.

    Housing mice in the laboratory in groups enables social interaction and is the way a laboratory should house mice. However, adult males show reciprocal aggression and are therefore frequently housed individually. Alternatively, a grid divider, which allows sensory contact by sight and smell but...

  19. The use of cage enrichment to reduce male mouse aggression

    Contributor(s):: Ambrose, N., Morton, D. B.

    The complete cleaning of cages has been shown to reduce the level of intermale aggression in mice. This study investigated the effects of the addition of enrichment objects on post cage-cleaning aggression in male BALB/c mice. Enrichment objects were found to significantly reduce aggressive...

  20. The use of positive reinforcement training techniques to enhance the care, management, and welfare of primates in the laboratory. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Laule, G. E., Bloomsmith, M. A., Schapiro, S. J.

    Handled frequently and subjected to a wide range of medical procedures that may be particularly invasive, nonhuman animals in a laboratory setting have unique needs. To produce the most reliable research results and to protect and enhance the well-being of the animals, it is desirable to perform...