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Tags: Marketing + Consumers

All Categories (1-20 of 33)

  1. Marketing Animal-Friendly Products: Addressing the Consumer Social Dilemma with Reinforcement Positioning Strategies

    Contributor(s):: Lenka van Riemsdijk, Paul T.M. Ingenbleek, Hans C.M. van Trijp, Gerrita van deer Veen

    This article presents a conceptual framework that aims to encourage consumer animal-friendly product choice by introducing positioning strategies for animal-friendly products. These strategies reinforce the animal welfare with different types of consumption values and can therefore reduce...

  2. Consumer attitudes to injurious pecking in free-range egg production

    Contributor(s):: Bennett, R. M., Jones, P. J., Nicol, C. J., Tranter, R. B., Weeks, C. A.

    Free-range egg producers face continuing problems from injurious pecking (IP) which has financial consequences for farmers and poor welfare implications for birds. Beak-trimming has been practised for many years to limit the damage caused by IP, but with the UK Government giving notification that...

  3. Animals in Advertising: Eliciting Powerful Consumer Response, Resulting in Enhanced Brand Engagement

    Contributor(s):: Natasha D. Braunwart

    The use of live animals as a communications tool has been seen in thousands of commercials, many of which have received international attention through online channels. As the Internet becomes a prevalent sharing platform, the reactions from viewers can be better understood with quantifiable...

  4. Does the Role a Pet Played before Disposition, and How the Pet is Lost Influence Pet Owner's Future Pet Adoption Decision?

    Contributor(s):: Tesfom, Goitom, Birch, Nancy J.

  5. Relationship patterns in food purchase: observing social interactions in different shopping environments

    Contributor(s):: Cicatiello, C., Pancino, B., Pascucci, S., Franco, S.

    The social dimension of purchase seems particularly important when it comes to food, since it can contribute to foster "consumers' embeddedness" in the local food system. The discussion on this topic is growing after the emergence of alternative food networks (AFNs), which are thought to have...

  6. The role of quality labels in market-driven animal welfare

    Contributor(s):: Heerwagen, L. R., Morkbak, M. R., Denver, S., Sandoe, P., Christensen, T.

    In policy-making the consumption of specially labelled products, and its role in improving the welfare of livestock, has attracted considerable attention. There is in many countries a diverse market for animal welfare-friendly products which is potentially confusing and may lack transparency. We...

  7. The Internet and health information: differences in pet owners based on age, gender, and education

    Contributor(s):: Kogan, L. R., Schoenfeld-Tacher, R., Viera, A. R.

  8. Understanding consumers who shop with their dogs and implications for pet retailers

    Contributor(s):: Clark, Paul W., Page, Jay, Fine, Monica B.

  9. Dangerous dog or dastardly dude? Anthropomorphism, threat, and willingness to approach non-human targets

    Contributor(s):: Butterfield, Max Edward

  10. Consumer choice and farmers' markets

    Contributor(s):: Dodds, R., Holmes, M., Arunsopha, V., Chin, N., Le, T., Maung, S., Shum, M.

    The increasing popularity of local food consumption can be attributed to the heightened awareness of food safety concerns, carbon emissions produced from food transportation, and an understanding of how large corporations' obtain their food supplies. Although there is increasing discussion on...

  11. A conception of moral sensitivity and everyday consumption practices: Insights from the moralizing discourses of pet owners

    Contributor(s):: McEachern, Morven G., Cheetham, Fiona

  12. Information need of owners regarding dog's healthcare, zoonotic diseases and marketing

    Contributor(s):: Basarajappa, A. D., Rupasi, Tiwari, Rakesh, Roy, Davinder, Singh, Matt, V. T., Devan, Arora

    The present study was purposively conducted at Clinical Complex, VeterinaryCollege, Hebbal, Bangalore; Referral Polyclinic, IVRI, Izatnagar; Veterinary polyclinic, GBPUAT, Pantnagar and Veterinary hospital, Palam, New Delhi, India. From each clinical complex, 50 pet dog owners were selected...

  13. Can we live without cats? Interpreting and expanding on Ellson's question from a cat-lover's perspective

    Contributor(s):: Megehee, Carol

  14. Comment on 'Can we live without a dog? Consumption life cycles in dog-owner relationships.'

    Contributor(s):: O'Shaughnessy, John

  15. Consumer behavior, extended-self, and sacred consumption: An alternative perspective from our animal companions

    Contributor(s):: Hill, Ronald Paul, Gaines, Jeannie, Wilson, R. Mark

  16. Figuring companion-species consumption: A multi-site ethnography of the post-canine Afghan hound

    Contributor(s):: Bettany, Shona, Daly, Rory

  17. Moving from subject-object to subject-subject relations: Comments on 'figuring companion-species consumption.'

    Contributor(s):: Peñaloza, Lisa

  18. Narrative and metacognition as consumer mystery: A comment on Hill, Gaines, and Wilson and animal companions

    Contributor(s):: Gould, Stephen J.

  19. Consumer autonomy and sufficiency of GMF labeling

    Contributor(s):: Siipi, H., Uusitalo, S.

    Individuals' food choices are intimately connected to their self-images and world views. Some dietary choices adopted by consumers pose restrictions on their use of genetically modified food (GMF). It is quite generally agreed that some kind of labeling is necessary for respecting consumers'...

  20. Does autonomy count in favor of labeling genetically modified food?

    Contributor(s):: Hansen, K.

    In this paper, I argue that consumer autonomy does not count in favour of the labelling of genetically modified foods (GM foods) more than for the labelling of non-GM foods. Further, reasonable considerations support the view that it is non-GM foods rather than GM foods that should be labelled.