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  1. Keeper-animal interactions: differences between the behaviour of zoo animals affect stockmanship

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ward, S. J., Melfi, V.

    Stockmanship is a term used to describe the management of animals with a good stockperson someone who does this in a in a safe, effective, and low-stress manner for both the stock-keeper and animals involved. Although impacts of unfamiliar zoo visitors on animal behaviour have been extensively...

  2. Training success in group-housed long-tailed macaques ( Macaca fascicularis) is better explained by personality than by social rank

    | Contributor(s):: Wergard, E. M., Westlund, K., Spangberg, M., Fredlund, H., Forkman, B.

    Using training to prepare laboratory animals for biomedical research is one important behavior management task. With increased knowledge about factors influencing training success, training programs may be optimized, resulting in a refinement of primate husbandry. Even when animals are trained...

  3. Coping strategies in captive capuchin monkeys ( Sapajus spp.)

    | Contributor(s):: Ferreira, R. G., Mendl, M., Wagner, P. G. C., Araujo, T., Nunes, D., Mafra, A. L.

    Studies on diverse species indicate the existence of individual differences in stress coping strategies labelled as 'proactive' and 'reactive'. Identifying taxonomic distribution of such coping strategies is fundamental to evolutionary models and to management of captive animals. Capuchin monkeys...

  4. The long-term impact of infant rearing background on the affective state of adult common marmosets ( Callithrix jacchus)

    | Contributor(s):: Ash, H., Buchanan-Smith, H. M.

    Early life environment, including temporary family separation, can have a major influence on affective state. Using a battery of tests, the current study compared the performance of adult common marmosets ( Callithrix jacchus), reared as infants under 3 different conditions: family-reared twins,...

  5. The Human Intruder Test: An Anxiety Assessment in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca Mulatta)

    | Contributor(s):: Emily J. Peterson

    The human intruder test (HIT) is a noninvasive tool widely used for assessing anxiety in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). This thesis explores the HIT procedure and applies it to a population of monkeys with a self-injurious behavioral pathology. Individual variation on this test can be used to...

  6. Evaluation of environmental and intrinsic factors that contribute to stereotypic behavior in captive rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta)

    | Contributor(s):: Gottlieb, D. H., Maier, A., Coleman, K.

    Full body repetitive behaviors, known as motor stereotypic behaviors (MSBs), are one of the most commonly seen abnormal behaviors in captive non-human primates, and are frequently used as a behavioral measure of well-being. The main goal of this paper was to examine the role of environmental...

  7. Effects of visual contact with zoo visitors on black-capped capuchin welfare

    | Contributor(s):: Sherwen, S. L., Harvey, T. J., Magrath, M. J. L., Butler, K. L., Fanson, K. V., Hemsworth, P. H.

    Previous research has suggested that the presence of zoo visitors may be stressful for various primate species, and visual contact with visitors may be the sensory stimuli that mediate visitor effects. We studied a group of black-capped capuchins, Cebus apella, in a controlled experiment,...

  8. Left gaze bias in humans, rhesus monkeys and domestic dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Kun Guo, Daniel Mills, Kerstin Meints, Charlotte Hall, Sophie Hall

    While viewing faces, human adults often demonstrate a natural gaze bias towards the left visual field, that is, the right side of the viewee’s face is often inspected first and for longer periods. Using a preferential looking paradigm, we demonstrate that this bias is neither uniquely human...

  9. Social housing of non-human primates in a research facility: socialisation across macaque species and sexes

    | Contributor(s):: Rehrig, A., DiVincenti, L., Jr., Schery, L. A.

    Refinement of social housing practices is paramount to improving animal welfare in laboratory environments, especially with regard to non-human primates. Even though social housing of the same species should be considered the optimal paradigm, cynomolgus ( Macaca fascicularis) and rhesus macaques...

  10. A two-choice preference assessment with five cotton-top tamarins ( Saguinus oedipus )

    | Contributor(s):: Fernandez, E. J., Dorey, N. R., Rosales-Ruiz, J.

    A study selected 5 cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) located at the Frank Buck Zoo in Gainesville, Texas, for a food preference assessment. The study used a paired-choice procedure across 7 different food items for all 5 tamarins. Preferences for the food items across all the tamarins...

  11. Bioacoustic monitoring of aggression in group-housed rhesus macaques

    | Contributor(s):: McCowan, B., Rommeck, I.

    Many captive primate facilities house rhesus macaques in multimale-multifemale social groups in large enclosures that simulate the natural social and environmental features characteristic of the species, enhancing their reproductive performance as well as their psychological well-being, yet one...

  12. Cage use and feeding height preferences of captive common marmosets ( Callithrix j. jacchus ) in two-tier cages

    | Contributor(s):: Buchanan-Smith, H. M., Shand, C., Morris, K.

    Determining appropriate feeding regimes has important welfare implications for captive primates. This study examined the preference of food bowl heights in 6 pairs of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) housed in a 2-tier cage system. Given that marmosets are arboreal and spend most of their...

  13. Determining the value of social companionship to captive tufted capuchin monkeys ( Cebus apella )

    | Contributor(s):: Dettmer, E., Fragaszy, D.

    The objective of the study is to assess the magnitude of the psychological need for social companionship in pair-housed tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) (six males and 1 female). The classification of commodities as necessities or luxuries are included. The study directly compared the...

  14. Effects of single-use and group-use enrichment on stereotypy and intragroup aggressive and affiliative behaviors of a social group of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) at the Singapore Zoo

    | Contributor(s):: Sha, J., Han, S., Marlena, D., Kee, J.

    Four food-based enrichment devices were used to test the effects of single-use and group-use enrichment devices on stereotypy, intragroup aggression, and affiliation in a compatible group of 5 squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). All enrichment devices were found to reduce overall stereotypic...

  15. Effects of training on stress-related behavior of the common marmoset ( Callithrix jacchus ) in relation to coping with routine husbandry procedures. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    | Contributor(s):: Bassett, L., Buchanan-Smith, H. M., McKinley, J., Smith, T. E.

    Using positive reinforcement, 12 common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were trained to provide urine samples on request. The marmosets were exposed to mildly stressful, routine husbandry procedures (i.e., capture and weighing). The non-human animals spent less time inactive poststressor as...

  16. Evaluating paint rollers as an intervention for alopecia in monkeys in the laboratory ( Macaca nemestrina )

    | Contributor(s):: Runeson, E. P., Lee, G. H., Crockett, C. M., Bellanca, R. U.

    Adult female macaques (Macaca nemestrina) in the laboratory with alopecia from known or suspected overgrooming were subjects in a study evaluating effectiveness of a grooming device. The intervention evaluated was a paint roller on a metal bar hung on the cage, replaced weekly for 6 weeks. In a...

  17. Fecal concentrations of cortisol, testosterone, and progesterone in cotton-top tamarins housed in different zoological parks: relationships among physiological data, environmental conditions, and behavioral patterns

    | Contributor(s):: Fontani, S., Vaglio, S., Beghelli, V., Mattioli, M., Bacci, S., Accorsi, P. A.

    The aim of this investigation was to study the welfare of 3 captive groups of cotton-top tamarins housed in different zoological parks. Ethological observations were conducted during 1 year. In addition, fecal samples were collected and the concentrations of glucocorticoids, androgens, and...

  18. Pair housing for female longtailed and rhesus macaques in the laboratory: behavior in protected contact versus full contact

    | Contributor(s):: Baker, K. C., Crockett, C. M., Lee, G. H., Oettinger, B. C., Schoof, V., Thom, J. P.

    Pair housing for caged macaques in the laboratory generally allows unrestricted tactile contact but, less commonly, may involve limited contact via grooming-contact bars or perforated panels. The purpose of using this protected contact housing, which prevents entry into pair-mates' cages,...

  19. Positive reinforcement training as a technique to alter nonhuman primate behavior: quantitative assessments of effectiveness. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    | Contributor(s):: Schapiro, S. J., Bloomsmith, M. A., Laule, G. E.

    Many suggest that operant conditioning techniques can be applied successfully to improve the behavioral management of nonhuman primates in research settings. However, relatively little empirical data exist to support this claim. This article is a review of several studies that discussed applied...

  20. Positive reinforcement training moderates only high levels of abnormal behavior in singly housed rhesus macaques

    | Contributor(s):: Baker, K. C., Bloomsmith, M., Neu, K., Griffis, C., Maloney, M., Oettinger, B., Schoof, V. A. M., Martinez, M.

    This study evaluated the application of positive reinforcement training (PRT) as an intervention for abnormal behaviors in singly housed laboratory rhesus macaques at 2 large primate facilities. Training involved basic control behaviors and body-part presentation. The study compared baseline...