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  1. A case study employing operant conditioning to reduce stress of capture for red-bellied tamarins ( Saguinus labiatus )

    Contributor(s):: Owen, Y., Amory, J. R.

    Traditional techniques used to capture New World monkeys, such as net capture, can induce high levels of acute stress detrimental to welfare. Alternatively, training nonhuman animals via operant conditioning to voluntarily participate in husbandry and/or veterinary practices is accepted as a...

  2. Artificial weaning of Old World monkeys: benefits and costs

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V.

    Permanent mother-infant separation prior to natural weaning is a common husbandry practice in monkey breeding colonies. In the United States, all eight Regional Primate Research Centres have such colonies. Under undisturbed conditions, Old World monkey mothers wean their infants at the age of...

  3. Cage use and feeding height preferences of captive common marmosets ( Callithrix j. jacchus ) in two-tier cages

    Contributor(s):: Buchanan-Smith, H. M., Shand, C., Morris, K.

    Determining appropriate feeding regimes has important welfare implications for captive primates. This study examined the preference of food bowl heights in 6 pairs of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) housed in a 2-tier cage system. Given that marmosets are arboreal and spend most of their...

  4. Effects of single-use and group-use enrichment on stereotypy and intragroup aggressive and affiliative behaviors of a social group of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) at the Singapore Zoo

    Contributor(s):: Sha, J., Han, S., Marlena, D., Kee, J.

    Four food-based enrichment devices were used to test the effects of single-use and group-use enrichment devices on stereotypy, intragroup aggression, and affiliation in a compatible group of 5 squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). All enrichment devices were found to reduce overall stereotypic...

  5. Effects of training on stress-related behavior of the common marmoset ( Callithrix jacchus ) in relation to coping with routine husbandry procedures. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Bassett, L., Buchanan-Smith, H. M., McKinley, J., Smith, T. E.

    Using positive reinforcement, 12 common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were trained to provide urine samples on request. The marmosets were exposed to mildly stressful, routine husbandry procedures (i.e., capture and weighing). The non-human animals spent less time inactive poststressor as...

  6. Evaluating paint rollers as an intervention for alopecia in monkeys in the laboratory ( Macaca nemestrina )

    Contributor(s):: Runeson, E. P., Lee, G. H., Crockett, C. M., Bellanca, R. U.

    Adult female macaques (Macaca nemestrina) in the laboratory with alopecia from known or suspected overgrooming were subjects in a study evaluating effectiveness of a grooming device. The intervention evaluated was a paint roller on a metal bar hung on the cage, replaced weekly for 6 weeks. In a...

  7. Improving the welfare of captive macaques ( Macaca sp.) through the use of water as enrichment

    Contributor(s):: Robins, J. G., Waitt, C. D.

    This review evaluates the use of water as a tool for enriching the environments of macaques (Macaca sp.) in captivity. Many macaque species are known to swim and forage in water in the wild, and in-situ reports suggest that access to water promotes activity and cultural behavior. Yet, there is a...

  8. Overcoming the barriers to the retirement of Old and New World monkeys from research facilities

    Contributor(s):: Kerwin, A. M.

    In this commentary I aim to raise awareness among researchers and sanctuary directors to potential barriers to retiring Old and New World monkeys from research facilities. I define a barrier as an opinion or stereotype that prevents primate retirement from occurring on a regular basis. By...

  9. Pair housing for female longtailed and rhesus macaques in the laboratory: behavior in protected contact versus full contact

    Contributor(s):: Baker, K. C., Crockett, C. M., Lee, G. H., Oettinger, B. C., Schoof, V., Thom, J. P.

    Pair housing for caged macaques in the laboratory generally allows unrestricted tactile contact but, less commonly, may involve limited contact via grooming-contact bars or perforated panels. The purpose of using this protected contact housing, which prevents entry into pair-mates' cages,...

  10. Possible costs of radio-tracking a young adult female mantled howler monkey ( Alouatta palliata ) in deciduous habitat of Costa Rican tropical dry forest

    Contributor(s):: Hilpert, A. L., Jones, C. B.

    Field experiments are required to determine the causes of the patterns identified in this report and their potential threats to the internal validity of field studies on mantled howlers. The literature on biotelemetry suggests that radio collars are likely to have deleterious effects on animals...

  11. Primate location preference in a double-tier cage: the effects of illumination and cage height

    Contributor(s):: Maclean, E. L., Prior, S. R., Platt, M. L., Brannon, E. M.

    Nonhuman primates are frequently housed in double-tier arrangements with significant differences between the environments of the upper and lower-row cages. Although several studies have investigated whether this arrangement alters monkeys' behavior, no studies have addressed the two most notable...

  12. Risk factors and remediation of self-injurious and self-abuse behavior in rhesus macaques

    Contributor(s):: Rommeck, I., Anderson, K., Heagerty, A., Cameron, A., McCowan, B.

    Considered signs of decreased welfare - abnormal behaviors such as self-injury and self-abuse among nonhuman primates housed in the laboratory - may put into question the validity and reliability of scientific research using these animals as models. Providing environmental enrichment decreases...

  13. Self-biting in caged macaques: cause, effect, and treatment

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V., Rossell, M.

    Injurious self-biting is one of the most serious problems in primate colonies (Niemeyer, Gray, & Stephen, 1996). "Approximately 10% of captive, individually-housed monkeys engage in the disturbing phenomenon of self-injurious behavior (SIB). To date, no adequate explanation or effective therapy...

  14. Severe intragroup aggressions in captive common marmosets ( Callithrix jacchus )

    Contributor(s):: Filippis, B. de, Chiarotti, F., Vitale, A.

    Members of captive colonies of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a small New World primate, can occasionally be victims of repeated, and potentially fatal, attacks by a family-mate. This study examined the records of a colony, looking for past instances of such aggressions. The aim was to...

  15. The effects of caretaker-primate relationships on primates in the laboratory

    Contributor(s):: Waitt, C., Buchanan-Smith, H. M., Morris, K.

    As contact with caretakers is likely to make up the majority of human-primate interactions in laboratories, caretakers represent an important influence in the lives of captive primates. The aim of this study was to determine how caretaker-primate relationships affected the behaviour of primates...

  16. The lower row monkey cage: an overlooked variable in biomedical research

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V., Reinhardt, A.

    A survey of 96 primatological articles revealed that cage location of research monkeys is rarely mentioned, although the environment of upper and lower row-housed animals markedly differs in terms of light quality, light intensity, and living dimension. Not accounting for these uncontrolled...

  17. The myth of the aggressive monkey

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V.

    Captive rhesus macaques are not naturally aggressive, but poor husbandry and handling practices can trigger their aggression toward conspecifics and toward the human handler. The myth of the aggressive monkey probably is based on often not taking into account basic ethological principles when...

  18. The role of zoos in the rehabilitation of animals in the circus

    Contributor(s):: Gupta, B. K., Bipul, Chakraborty

    In 1998, the government of India enforced a ban on performance/exhibition of 5 species of nonhuman animals: (a) lions, (b) tigers, (c) leopards, (d) bears, and (e) monkeys. The Ministry of Environment and Forests gave the responsibility to the Central Zoo Authority (CZA) for rehabilitation of...

  19. Video preference assessment and behavioral management of single-caged Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) by movie presentation

    Contributor(s):: Ogura, T., Matsuzawa, T.

    Movie presentation can act as an enrichment technique for nonhuman primates, who also show preferences for certain contents. This study investigated the video preferences and effects of movies on behavioral abnormalities in single-caged Japanese macaques. When movie rewards were provided for...

  20. Animal welfare considerations in primate rehabilitation: an assessment of three vervet monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops) releases in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa

    Contributor(s):: Guy, A. J., Stone, O. M. L., Curnoe, D.