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  1. Animal viewing in postmodern America : a case study of the Yellowstone wolf watchers

    Contributor(s):: Jo Anne Young

    The purpose of this thesis is to examine the American relationship with wildlife by way of a case study of the Yellowstone wolf watchers. The American relationship with nature and animals changed at a never before seen rate during the modern era because of capitalism and industrialization. Our...

  2. Influences of Social Norms, Habit and Ambivalence on Park Visitors' Dog Leash Compliance for Protecting Wildlife

    Contributor(s):: Matthew Bowes

    Non-compliance with visitor regulations in national parks can have an impact on park conservation and the experience of other park visitors. Park management in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve located on the west coast of British Columbia, Canada is challenged by visitors’ non-compliant...

  3. Human- Wildlife Conflict - The case of elephant at Mole National Park

    Contributor(s):: Zodiac Akenten

    Conflicts between wildlife and humans, particularly people who share immediate boundaries with protected areas, are common phenomenon. Declining wildlife resources has been linked to human actions through overexploitation, habitat destruction, and habitat fragmentation among others. Local people...

  4. Wolf Reintroduction Into Yellowstone Park

    Contributor(s):: Erin Quartley

  5. Behavior of feral horses in response to culling and GnRH immunocontraception

    Contributor(s):: Ransom, J. I., Powers, J. G., Garbe, H. M., Oehler, M. W., Sr., Nett, T. M., Baker, D. L.

    Wildlife management actions can alter fundamental behaviors of individuals and groups, which may directly impact their life history parameters in unforeseen ways. This is especially true for highly social animals because changes in one individual's behavior can cascade throughout its social...

  6. The effects of anthropogenic noise and human activities on ungulate behavior

    Contributor(s):: Casey Lynn Brown

    The effect of anthropogenic noise on terrestrial wildlife is a relatively new area of study with broad ranging management implications. Human activities may increase noise in protected areas, including U.S. National Parks. Grand Teton National Park (GTNP) draws nearly 4 million visitors a year to...

  7. Encounters on the frontier: Banteng in Australia's Northern Territory

    Contributor(s):: deKoninck, V.

    This paper considers the case of an introduced species that resides in what is now a jointly managed national park in the north of tropical Australia. Banteng ( Bos javanicus) are a peculiar feral nonhuman animal in that they constitute a potential environmental threat within the domestic...

  8. What good is a bear to society?

    Contributor(s):: Harding, L.

    Arising out of fieldwork in the Canadian Rockies, this paper analyzes the role of bears in the conservation culture of Canadian national parks. Why is the presence of this large predator tolerated and even celebrated by some? And why do others fear and even despise this animal, whom they see as a...

  9. Promoting companion animal leash compliance on an urban park trail system

    Contributor(s):: Tardona, D. R.

  10. Human Activity Differentially Redistributes Large Mammals in the Canadian Rockies National Parks

    Contributor(s):: James Kimo Rogala, Mark Hebblewhite, Jesse Whittington, Cliff A. White, Jenny Coleshill, Marco Musiani

    National parks are important for conservation of species such as wolves (Canis lupus) and elk (Cervus canadensis). However, topography, vegetation conditions, and anthropogenic infrastructure within parks may limit available habitat. Human activity on trails and roads may lead to indirect habitat...

  11. The effects of immunocontraception on harem fidelity in a feral horse ( Equus caballus ) population

    Contributor(s):: Madosky, J. M., Rubenstein, D. I., Howard, J. J., Stuska, S.

    Feral horses on Shackleford Banks Island, North Carolina, are managed by the National Park Service in order to reduce their impact on the fragile barrier island ecosystem. Management techniques include removal of young horses and immunocontraception of many of the mares using Porcine Zona...

  12. Effects of fly disturbance on the behaviour of a population of reintroduced Przewalski horses ( Equus ferus przewalskii ) in Mongolia

    Contributor(s):: King, S. R. B., Gurnell, J.

    Flies constitute a cost to animals by feeding from them, passing on disease or by preventing them feeding effectively. These costs could be more severe to animals suffering from some kind of stress such as reintroduction as part of a conservation programme. This study focused on the effects of...