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  1. Surveillance for respiratory and diarrheal pathogens at the human-pig interface in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Laura K. Borkenhagen, Kerry A. Mallinson, Rick W. Tsao, Siaw-Jing Ha, Wei-Honn Lim, Teck-Hock Toh, Benjamin D. Anderson, Jane K. Fieldhouse, Sarah E. Philo, Kuek-Sen Chong, William G. Lindsley, Alejandro Ramirez, James F. Lowe, Kristen K. Coleman, Gregory C. Gray

    Background The large livestock operations and dense human population of Southeast Asia are considered a hot-spot for emerging viruses. Objectives To determine if the pathogens adenovirus (ADV), coronavirus (CoV), encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), enterovirus (EV), influenza A-D (IAV, IBV, ICV,...

  2. Multisectoral prioritization of zoonotic diseases in Uganda, 2017: A One Health perspective

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Musa Sekamatte, Vikram Krishnasamy, Lilian Bulage, Christine Kihembo, Noelina Nantima, Fred Monje, Deo Ndumu, Juliet Sentumbwe, Betty Mbolanyi, Robert Aruho, Winyi Kaboyo, David Mutonga, Colin Basler, Sarah Paige, Casey Barton Behravesh

    Background Zoonotic diseases continue to be a public health burden globally. Uganda is especially vulnerable due to its location, biodiversity, and population. Given these concerns, the Ugandan government in collaboration with the Global Health Security Agenda conducted a One Health Zoonotic...

  3. Recent animal disease outbreaks and their impact on human populations

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jeff B Bender, William Hueston, Michael Osterholm

    There are very positive and strong connections between animals and humans, but also reasons for concern because about 61% of all human pathogens are zoonotic. The increase in new diseases, is due to increases in world trade, animal translocation, ecological disruptions, climate change,...

  4. The Biocultural Landscape of Zoonotic Disease: Examining Human-Animal Vulnerability to Anthrax on the Colombian-Venezuelan Border

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jennifer A. Ida

    The focus of this thesis is to provide a holistic understanding of the political, cultural, environmental, and biological factors that may be contributing to increased vulnerability to anthrax in Wayuu and non-Wayuu human and livestock communities in La Guajira, Colombia. Qualitative data...

  5. The Biocultural Landscape of Zoonotic Disease: Examining Human-Animal Vulnerability to Anthrax on the Colombian-Venezuelan Border

    | Contributor(s):: Jennifer Ashley Ida

    The focus of this thesis is to provide a holistic understanding of the political, cultural, environmental, and biological factors that may be contributing to increased vulnerability to anthrax in Wayuu and non-Wayuu human and livestock communities in La Guajira, Colombia. Qualitative data...

  6. Model-Based Reverse Translation Between Veterinary and Human Medicine: The One Health Initiative

    | Contributor(s):: Benjamin Schneider, Violeta Balbas-Martinez, Albert E. Jergens, Inaki F. Troconiz

    There is growing concern about the limitations of rodent models with regard to recapitulation of human disease pathogenesis. Computational modeling of data from humans and animals sharing similar diseases provides an opportunity for parallel drug development in human and veterinary medicine....

  7. A Functional Tool for the Prioritization of Zoonotic Diseases in Ontario

    | Contributor(s):: Victoria Ng, Jan M. Sargeant

    Presentation on the creation of a functional tool regarding prioritization of zoonotic diseases in Ontario including a discussion of disease criteria for prioritization and multi-criteria decision analysis.

  8. Current opinion on maximizing veterinary profession growth and contributions

    | Contributor(s):: Nimmanapalli, R., Donapaty, S. R.

    Veterinary profession sphere overlaps three major biology arenas namely agriculture, basic sciences, and human medicine. Thus, so far the investments in veterinary field are not proportional to the scope of their responsibilities. Rededication and rejuvenation can help veterinary profession to...

  9. Forming an end of life hospice/Pawspice service

    | Contributor(s):: Villalobos, A. E.

    Practitioners who support the human-animal bond can organize a team to provide end of life hospice/'Pawspice' care services in their hospitals. Selected staff can acquire communication skills needed to deal with end of life care issues. Pawspice carers often express worry, disappointment, fear,...

  10. Paleopathology: health and welfare of animals in the pastPaleopathologie: gezondheid en welzijn van dieren in het verleden

    | Contributor(s):: Groot, M.

    This paper presents a short introduction to the field of palaeopathology, which can be studied from either a historical veterinary perspective or a zooarchaeological perspective. Zooarchaeologists are concerned with studying past human behaviour through animal remains found in archaeological...

  11. Examining differences between homebound older adult pet owners and non-pet owners in depression, systemic inflammation, and executive function

    | Contributor(s):: Branson, S., Boss, L., Cron, S., Kang, DuckHee

    Homebound older adults are prone to depression, which is linked to systemic inflammation that promotes executive function decline. A companion animal may reduce the negative biobehavioral processes associated with depression, inflammation, and reduced executive function in homebound older adults....

  12. The associations between animal-based welfare measures and the presence of indicators of food safety in finishing pigs

    | Contributor(s):: Alpigiani, I., Bacci, C., Keeling, L. J., Salman, M. D., Brindani, F., Pongolini, S., Hitchens, P. L., Bonardi, S.

    Stressful housing and management practices affect animals, potentially increasing their receptiveness to pathogens. Since some pathogens do not lead to clinical signs of sickness, subclinical pigs could enter the food-chain, contaminating carcases and offal at slaughter, representing a threat to...

  13. Welfare effects of a disease eradication programme for dairy goats

    | Contributor(s):: Muri, K., Leine, N., Valle, P. S.

    The Norwegian dairy goat industry has largely succeeded in controlling caprine arthritis encephalitis (CAE), caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) and paratuberculosis through a voluntary disease eradication programme called Healthier Goats (HG). The aim of this study was to apply an on-farm welfare...

  14. Human-animal interactions: Survey of contact behavior relevant for the spread of infectious diseases

    | Contributor(s):: Yimer Wasihun Kifle

    Background: Approximately 75 percent of recently emerging infectious diseases that affect humans are diseases of animal origin, and approximately 60 percent of all human pathogens are zoonotic. Contact between humans and pets, livestock, poultry and other animals could enable transmission of...

  15. May 07 2017

    8th International Conference on Emerging Zoonoses

    We take great pleasure in inviting you to join us for the 8th International Conference on Emerging Zoonoses with an emphasis on Emerging and Transboundary Infectious Diseases, which will take place...

    https://habricentral.org/events/details/512

  16. Zoonotic importance of dermatophytosis in dogs and cats

    | Contributor(s):: Cindy Paola Cruz Alcala

    Dermatophytoses are infections caused by dermatophyte fungi of the genus Microsporum, Epidermophyton and Trichophyton, which affect the keratinized tissues of the skin, hair and nails. Dermatophytosis in canines and felines are frequent pathologies that constitute an important mycosis in these...

  17. Human-Animal Interactions at Zoological Institutions

    | Contributor(s):: Christopher Marion

    Objective – To determine the preventive practices concerning zoonotic disease transmission between humans and animals in interactive exhibits at Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) accredited institutions. Data were also analyzed to determine if annual budget was associated with...

  18. Risk of zoonotic pathogen exposure among veterinary professionals and students at veterinary schools and best practices to minimize this risk on individual and institutional levels

    | Contributor(s):: Ellen R.E. Heinrich

    The College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) environment is a place where veterinarians, veterinary staff, and veterinary students may have increased risk of exposure to zoonotic pathogens. This exposure may occur in classrooms or laboratories where pre-clinical veterinary students and non-clinical...

  19. Welfare effects of a disease eradication programme for dairy goats

    | Contributor(s):: Muri, K., Leine, N., Valle, P. S.

    The Norwegian dairy goat industry has largely succeeded in controlling caprine arthritis encephalitis (CAE), caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) and paratuberculosis through a voluntary disease eradication programme called Healthier Goats (HG). The aim of this study was to apply an on-farm welfare...

  20. Examining differences between homebound older adult pet owners and non-pet owners in depression, systemic inflammation, and executive function

    | Contributor(s):: Branson, S., Boss, L., Cron, S., Kang, DuckHee

    Homebound older adults are prone to depression, which is linked to systemic inflammation that promotes executive function decline. A companion animal may reduce the negative biobehavioral processes associated with depression, inflammation, and reduced executive function in homebound older adults....