You are here: Home / Tags / Physiology and biochemistry + Animal welfare / All Categories

Tags: Physiology and biochemistry + Animal welfare

All Categories (1-20 of 21)

  1. Cortisol levels in dolphin Tursiops truncatus interactive programs linked to humanNiveles de cortisol en delfines Tursiops truncatus vinculados a programas interactivos con humanos

    Contributor(s):: Sanchez Okrucky, R., Morales Vela, B.

    Understanding the physiological changes in animals during physical activity to improve animal welfare has become increasingly important in animal collections that remain under human care. To date, the effect of interactive programs on dolphins under human care has not been evaluated, for that...

  2. Acoustic analysis of cattle ( Bos taurus) mother-offspring contact calls from a source-filter theory perspective

    Contributor(s):: Torre, M. P. de la, Briefer, E. F., Reader, T., McElligott, A. G.

    Cattle vocalisations have been proposed as potential indicators of animal welfare. However, very few studies have investigated the acoustic structure and information encoded in these vocalisations using advanced analysis techniques. Vocalisations play key roles in a wide range of communication...

  3. Travel-related problems in pets

    Contributor(s):: Mills, D., Dube, M. B., Zulch, H.

    Sections on the nature and treatment of travel-related problems of pets, including cats.

  4. Well-being and its roots

    Contributor(s):: Fraser, A. F.

    This chapter describes the physiological and behavioural indicators of health and well-being in cats. The specific behavioural traits of some different cat breeds are also included.

  5. Facilitating 'learning from mom how to eat like a pig' to improve welfare of piglets around weaning

    Contributor(s):: Oostindjer, M., Kemp, B., Brand, H. van den, Bolhuis, J. E.

    Piglets in commercial husbandry are weaned abruptly and at a rather young age. Many weanling piglets are poorly adapted to ingest solid food, often resulting in a period of underfeeding. The underfeeding generally leads to a poor growth, diarrhoea occurrence and the development of damaging...

  6. Physiological effects of human-animal positive interaction in dogs - review of the literature

    Contributor(s):: Pop, D., Rusu, A. S., Pop-Vancia, V., Papuc, I., Constantinescu, R., Miresan, V.

    Positive human-animal interactions (HAI) are known to increase the quality of life in both humans and dogs. Although there are several reviews on the benefits of HAI in humans, there are no reviews on the effects of positive HAI in dogs. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to provide a review of...

  7. Captive coyotes compared to their counterparts in the wild: does environmental enrichment help?

    Contributor(s):: Shivik, J. A., Palmer, G. L., Gese, E. M., Osthaus, B.

    This article attempts to determine the effects of environment (captive or wild) and a simple form of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of a nonhuman animal. Specifically, analyses first compared behavioral budgets and stereotypic behavior of captive coyotes (Canis latrans)...

  8. There's a rat in my room! Now what? Mice show no chronic physiological response to the presence of rats

    Contributor(s):: Meijer, M. K., Loo, P. L. P. van, Baumans, V.

    In general, guidelines on housing and care of animals in the laboratory state that rats and mice should not be housed in the same room. Mice may perceive rats as predators. Although one theory says this can cause stress, there is little scientific evidence to support this theory. In the wild,...

  9. Effect of gestation management system on gilt and piglet performance

    Contributor(s):: Muns, R., Manzanilla, E. G., Manteca, X., Gasa, J.

    Individual gestation housing of pregnant sows in stalls from four weeks after mating is banned in the EU. Two experiments were conducted to study the effect of two gestation management and housing systems (STALL: gilts housed in stalls and PEN: gilts loose-housed in pens with increased feed...

  10. Providing elevated 'getaway bunks' to nursing mink dams improves their health and welfare

    Contributor(s):: Dawson, L., Buob, M., Haley, D., Miller, S., Stryker, J., Quinton, M., Mason, G.

  11. Environmental enrichment exerts anxiolytic effects in the Indian field mouse (Mus booduga)

    Contributor(s):: Varman, D. R., Ganapathy, Marimuthu, Rajan, K. E.

  12. Stress response of working African elephants to transportation and safari adventures

    Contributor(s):: Millspaugh, T. T., Burke, T., Dyk, G. van, Slotow, R., Washburn, B. E., Woods, R. J.

    African elephants (Loxodonta africana) are intensively managed in southern Africa and are routinely translocated between reserves. Domesticated elephants are used for elephant-back safaris and interactions with guests. Understanding how elephants respond to such activities is critical because of...

  13. Adrenocorticotrophin-induced stress response in captive vicunas ( Vicugna vicugna ) in the Andes of Chile

    Contributor(s):: Bonacic, C., Macdonald, D. W., Villouta, G.

    The vicuna is mainly used in two ways: wild captured, shorn and returned to the wild; or wild captured and maintained in captivity as part of a programme of sustainable use in the Andes of South America. Farming of wild vicunas has hitherto involved no assessment of their welfare. In this study a...

  14. Body weight change as a measure of stress: a practical test

    Contributor(s):: McLaren, G. W., Mathews, F., Fell, R., Gelling, M., Macdonald, D. W.

    We report on the efficacy of body weight change as a measure of trapping and handling stress in two species of wild small mammal: bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) and wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus). We tested two hypotheses: (1) that weight change after capture and handling is related to the...

  15. Impact of trapping and handling on Leukocyte Coping Capacity in bank voles ( Clethrionomys glareolus ) and wood mice ( Apodemus sylvaticus )

    Contributor(s):: Gelling, M., McLaren, G. W., Mathews, F., Mian, R., Macdonald, D. W.

    Small mammals are routinely live-trapped and subsequently handled for a range of ecological and behavioural studies. Despite the techniques commonly employed being potentially stressful for the individual animals involved, it has hitherto been difficult to quantify the physiological impact. Here,...

  16. Song development in birds: the role of early experience and its potential effect on rehabilitation success

    Contributor(s):: Spencer, K. A., Harris, S., Baker, P. J., Cuthill, I. C.

    Environmental conditions during the early life stages of birds can have significant effects on the quality of sexual signals in adulthood, especially song, and these ultimately have consequences for breeding success and fitness. This has wide-ranging implications for the rehabilitation protocols...

  17. Stress in wild-caught Eurasian otters ( Lutra lutra ): effects of a long-acting neuroleptic and time in captivity

    Contributor(s):: Fernandez-Moran, J., Saavedra, D., Ruiz de la Torre, J. L., Manteca-Vilanova, X.

    As part of a translocation project, 28 Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra) were captured from the wild and transported to the Barcelona Zoo for veterinary evaluation, quarantine and intraperitoneal implantation of telemetry devices. Eleven animals were injected with the long-acting neuroleptic (LAN)...

  18. The effect of handling under anaesthetic on the recapture rate of wild ship rats ( Rattus rattus )

    Contributor(s):: Prout, D. M., King, C. M.

    This paper describes a two-part study of small predators in New Zealand forests. First, during 12 days of live-trapping, 31 wild ship rats were captured, tagged and released: 9 were handled while anaesthetised using halothane and 22 were handled while conscious using gloves. There was a...

  19. The effect of transport stress on neutrophil activation in wild badgers ( Meles meles )

    Contributor(s):: Montes, I., McLaren, G. W., Macdonald, D. W., Mian, R.

    Wild badgers (Meles meles) in Wytham woods, Oxfordshire, are routinely trapped, transported to a central field laboratory, studied and released as part of an on-going population study. These procedures have been carefully developed to minimize impact on the badgers' welfare; however they are...

  20. The physiological impact of wool-harvesting procedures in vicunas ( Vicugna vicugna )

    Contributor(s):: Bonacic, C., Macdonald, D. W.

    A current programme of wildlife utilization in the Andean region involves the capture of wild vicunas, their shearing, transport and, in some cases, captive farming. The effects of these interventions on the physiology, and thus welfare, of wild vicunas are unknown. As a first step to quantifying...