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  1. Survival rates o f cat-attacked birds admitted to RSPCA wildlife centres in the UK: implications for cat owners and wildlife rehabilitators

    Contributor(s):: Baker, P. J., Thompson, R., Grogan, A.

  2. Livestock predation by common leopard in Binsar Wildlife Sanctuary, India: human- wildlife conflicts and conservation issues

    Contributor(s):: Kala, Chandra Prakash, Kothari, Kishor Kumar

  3. Assessing the effectiveness of the Birdsbesafe anti-predation collar cover in reducing predation on wildlife by pet cats in Western Australia

    Contributor(s):: Hall, C. M., Fontaine, J. B., Bryant, K. A., Calver, M. C.

    Many pet cats hunt and, irrespective of whether or not this threatens wildlife populations, distressed owners may wish to curtail hunting while allowing their pets to roam. Therefore we evaluated the effectiveness of three patterned designs (simple descriptions being rainbow, red and yellow) of...

  4. Individual hunting behaviour and prey specialisation in the house cat Felis catus: implications for conservation and management

    Contributor(s):: Dickman, C. R., Newsome, T. M.

    Predators are often classed as prey specialists if they eat a narrow range of prey types, or as generalists if they hunt multiple prey types. Yet, individual predators often exhibit sex, size, age or personality-related differences in their diets that may alter the impacts of predation on...

  5. Converging on ancient bones: a review of the evidence for the close relatedness of humans ( Homo sapiens) and spotted hyenas ( Crocuta crocuta)

    Contributor(s):: Baynes-Rock, M.

    The majority of spotted hyena studies are conducted in places such as national parks and reserves where there are few humans present other than the researchers. I argue that this reflects a perception that "real" hyenas are those largely unaffected by contact with humans. This is at odds with...

  6. Ranging characteristics of the domestic cat ( Felis catus) in an urban environment

    Contributor(s):: Thomas, R. L., Baker, P. J., Fellowes, M. D. E.

    In many countries, high densities of domestic cats ( Felis catus) are found in urban habitats where they have the potential to exert considerable predation pressure on their prey. However, little is known of the ranging behaviour of cats in the UK. Twenty cats in suburban Reading, UK, were fitted...

  7. Vigilance, time budgets and predation risk in reintroduced captive-bred grey partridges Perdix perdix

    Contributor(s):: Rantanen, E. M., Buner, F., Riordan, P., Sotherton, N., Macdonald, D. W.

    Anti-predator behaviour has direct fitness consequences for prey species and thereby affects their reintroduction success, which has generally been poor. Development of anti-predator behaviour may be impaired in captive conditions which favour low emotional reactivity, resulting in poor...

  8. The efficacy of collar-mounted devices in reducing the rate of predation of wildlife by domestic cats

    Contributor(s):: Nelson, S. H., Evans, A. D., Bradbury, R. B.

    Volunteer cat owners from across the UK were recruited to take part in two trials designed to test the efficacy of collar-mounted warning devices in reducing cat predation rates of native wildlife. Cats equipped with a bell returned 34% fewer mammals and 41% fewer birds than those with a plain...

  9. Protecting egg prey from Carrion Crows: the potential of aversive conditioning

    Contributor(s):: Cox, R., Baker, S. E., Macdonald, D. W., Berdoy, M.

    Carrion Crows, Corvus corone, are held responsible for taking the eggs and chicks of many bird species. In areas of conservation significance, intervention may be required. Traditionally, managers have attempted to control predation by killing predators, but this may not be the most effective or...

  10. Maintaining behavioural diversity in captivity for conservation: natural behaviour management

    Contributor(s):: Rabin, L. A.