You are here: Home / Tags / rabbits + Pets and companion animals / All Categories

Tags: rabbits + Pets and companion animals

All Categories (1-20 of 53)

  1. Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Pet Rabbit Mammary Carcinomas: A Study with Relevance to Comparative Pathology

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sandra Schöniger, Sophie Degner, Qian Zhang, Claudia Schandelmaier, Heike Aupperle-Lellbach, Bharat Jasani, Heinz-Adolf Schoon

    Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) serve as prognostic biomarker in human breast cancer. Rabbits have the potential to act as animal model for human breast cancer, and close similarities exist between the rabbit and human immune system. The aim of this study is to characterize TILs in pet...

  2. Expression of Myoepithelial Markers in Mammary Carcinomas of 119 Pet Rabbits

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sophie Degner, Heinz-Adolf Schoon, Sebastian Degner, Mathias Baudis, Claudia Schandelmaier, Heike Aupperle-Lellbach, Sandra Schöniger

    Most mammary tumors in pet rabbits are carcinomas; prognostic factors are unknown. The aim of this study on rabbit mammary carcinomas was to determine the expression of myoepithelial markers that have a prognostic relevance in human cancers. Mammary carcinomas (n = 119) of female or...

  3. Rehoming of pet rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in Sweden: an investigation of national advertisement

    | Contributor(s):: Ulfsdotter, L., Lundberg, A., Andersson, M.

  4. 'All ears': a questionnaire of 1516 owner perceptions of the mental abilities of pet rabbits, subsequent resource provision, and the effect on welfare

    | Contributor(s):: McMahon, S. A., Wigham, E.

  5. Bunny Besties

    Full-text: Available

    Bunny Besties is an all-volunteer nonprofit that addresses the heightened stress in our community.  We do it with cuddly loving bunnies and with the principles founded through studies at Mayo Clinic and our work with Boynton Health Services at the University of Minnesota.   Our...

  6. What Makes a Rabbit Cute? Preference for Rabbit Faces Differs according to Skull Morphology and Demographic Factors

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Naomi D. Harvey, James A. Oxley, Giuliana Miguel-Pacheco, Emma M. Gosling, Mark Farnworth

    Domesticated rabbits typically exhibit shorter, flatter skulls than their wild counterparts (brachycephalism). However, brachycephaly is associated with considerable health problems, including problems with dentition. The aim of this study was to establish which type of rabbit face people...

  7. A Survey of Rabbit Handling Methods Within the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland

    | Contributor(s):: Oxley, James Andrew, Ellis, Clare Frances, McBride, E. Anne, McCormick, Wanda Denise

    Rabbits are commonly kept in a variety of settings, including homes, laboratories, and veterinary clinics. Despite the popularity of keeping this prey species, little research has investigated current methods of handling. The aim of this study was to examine the experience of caregivers (owners...

  8. The Changing Legal Status of Cats in Australia: From Friend of the Settlers, to Enemy of the Rabbit, and Now a Threat to Biodiversity and Biosecurity Risk

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sophie Riley

    In NSW, free-roaming cats are regarded as one the biggest threats to biodiversity. Yet, at one stage they were classified as “the enemy of the rabbit” and were protected and released in their thousands. The purpose of this article is to examine the changing status of cats in...

  9. Assessing Pet Rabbit Welfare Based on General Discussion on Human-Animal Relationship

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Yufei Ren

    Pets are popular worldwide, and more than half of human population keep pets. Cats and dogs have the highest percentage of being kept in households, and the population of rabbits is about one-tenth of cats or dogs. Humans’ love for pets can be dated back to Holocene when humans started to...

  10. The Human-Animal Interaction Scale: development and evaluation

    | Contributor(s):: Fournier, A. K., Berry, T. D., Letson, E., Chanen, R.

    The purpose of this study was to develop the Human–Animal Interaction Scale (HAIS) and evaluate its reliability and validity. The HAIS is a 24-item self-report instrument designed to describe and quantify behaviors performed by humans and nonhuman animals during an episode of interaction...

  11. The effects of pets on schizophrenics in a day treatment program

    | Contributor(s):: Carol Lynne Eyster

    In an effort to record the therapeutic effects of animals, three rabbits were introduced into a group therapy setting. Eight subjects (two female, six male) having the diagnosis of schizophrenia, chronic type and participating in a day treatment program were observed by four trained observers....

  12. ExNOTic: Should We Be Keeping Exotic Pets?

    | Contributor(s):: Rachel A Grant, V Tamara Montrose, Alison P Wills

    There has been a recent trend towards keeping non-traditional companion animals, also known as exotic pets. These pets include parrots, reptiles, amphibians and rabbits, as well as small species of rodent such as degus and guinea pigs. Many of these exotic pet species are not domesticated, and...

  13. Teaching rabbit care, empathy, and responsibility

    | Contributor(s):: Meryl B. Dickman

    Acclimating and housetraining a new rabbit should be approached in an organized and efficient manner. Due to the lack of instructional guides for rabbit housetraining currently available, new rabbit owners do not have adequate housetraining resources. Lack of proper housetraining instruction,...

  14. Domestic rabbits: diseases and parasites

    | Contributor(s):: Nephi M. Patton, K.W. Hagen, J.R. Gorham, Ronald E. Flatt

    Designed to help ranchers recognize common rabbit diseases. Diseases are classified according to major cause-bacterial, viral, nutritional, hereditary, fungal, and miscellaneous (including poisoning, tumors, and vices). For each disease, the symptoms and treatment are described. Provides advice...

  15. The current state of welfare, housing and husbandry of the English pet rabbit population

    | Contributor(s):: Rooney, N. J., Blackwell, E. J., Mullan, S. M., Saunders, R., Baker, P. E., Hill, J. M., Sealey, C. E., Turner, M. J., Held, S. D.

  16. Motivations for and thoughts toward rabbit ownership and factors contributing to companion-rabbit owners' knowledge

    | Contributor(s):: Tasha Welch

    Prospective rabbit owners’ pre-acquisition motivations for and thoughts toward rabbit ownership were explored using one-on-one telephone interviews (n=18). Thematic analysis revealed the theme considerations prior to acquiring a companion rabbit, which involved four subthemes: reasons given...

  17. A preliminary internet survey of pet rabbit owners' characteristics

    | Contributor(s):: Oxley, J. A., Previti, A., Alibrandi, A., Briefer, E. F., Passantino, A.

    This study aimed to conduct a preliminary survey to investigate basic ownership factors, frequency of microchipping and insurance and views of pet rabbit owners on these areas and general rabbit management. More specifically, we aimed to investigate whether owners possess insurance, whether their...

  18. "Nobody Wants to Eat Them Alive:" Ethical Dilemmas and Dual Media Narratives on Domestic Rabbits as Pets and Commodity

    | Contributor(s):: Gayane F. Torosyan, Brian Lowe

    Using semiotic analysis, this study explores changes occurring in the societal perception of rabbits as farm animals as juxtaposed to their increasing popularity as domestic companions. This study is based on a preliminary hypothesis that rabbits are increasingly perceived and portrayed in media...

  19. Companion rabbit and companion bird management practices among a representative sample of guardians in Victoria, Australia

    | Contributor(s):: Howell, T. J., Mornement, K., Bennett, P. C.

    Although companion animal management practices used by caregivers can influence the welfare of the companion animals, there is little existing information about the ways in which people attempt to meet their companion animals' needs. A representative sample of rabbit guardians ( n=93,...

  20. The effect of four different feeding regimes on rabbit behaviour

    | Contributor(s):: Prebble, J. L., Langford, F. M., Shaw, D. J., Meredith, A. L.

    Dietary composition and presentation impacts on the behaviour of animals, and failure to provide a suitable diet can lead to reduced welfare through the development of poor health, the inability to express normal behaviours and the development of abnormal behaviours. This study assessed the...