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  1. Working with laboratory rodents in Spain: a survey on welfare and wellbeing

    Contributor(s):: Goni-Balentziaga, O., Ortega-Saez, I., Vila, S., Azkona, G.

  2. Pet Behaviour Science | Open Access Journal

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: David Menor

    Pet Behaviour Science is a new open access journal, which publishes original papers relating to all aspects of the behaviour of pets, including their relationships with humans. As a multidisciplinary journal, Pet Behaviour Science welcomes submissions from the arts and humanities, behavioural and...

  3. Individual hunting behaviour and prey specialisation in the house cat Felis catus: implications for conservation and management

    Contributor(s):: Dickman, C. R., Newsome, T. M.

    Predators are often classed as prey specialists if they eat a narrow range of prey types, or as generalists if they hunt multiple prey types. Yet, individual predators often exhibit sex, size, age or personality-related differences in their diets that may alter the impacts of predation on...

  4. Social support does not require attachment: any conspecific tranquilizes isolated guinea-pig pups

    Contributor(s):: Tokumaru, R. S., Ades, C., Monticelli, P. F.

    Guinea pig pups produce typical distress whistles when isolated. Whistles' frequency is decreased or abolished when they contact with the mother and, to a lesser degree, a sibling or even an unfamiliar female, is regained. Those non-aggressive companions were considered social support providers...

  5. The effect of isoflurane anaesthesia and buprenorphine on the mouse grimace scale and behaviour in CBA and DBA/2 mice

    Contributor(s):: Miller, A., Kitson, G., Skalkoyannis, B., Leach, M.

    Prevention or alleviation of pain in laboratory mice is a fundamental requirement of in vivo research. The mouse grimace scale (MGS) has the potential to be an effective and rapid means of assessing pain and analgesic efficacy in laboratory mice. Preliminary studies have demonstrated its...

  6. Sep 28 2015

    2015 Animal Ethics Seminar

    A seminar for members of Animal Ethics Committees and their Executive Officers, and animal researchers, is to be held at the Australian Catholic University, North Sydney, on 29 September 2015. The...

    https://habricentral.org/events/details/353

  7. Playful handling of laboratory rats is more beneficial when applied before than after routine injections

    Contributor(s):: Cloutier, S., Wahl, K. L., Panksepp, J., Newberry, R. C.

    The ability of positive affective states to counteract negative states engendered by routine medical procedures remains poorly studied. In laboratory rats, positive affect typically associated with rough-and-tumble play can be induced through human "hand play" - the experience of being "tickled"...

  8. Potential welfare impacts of kill-trapping European moles ( Talpa europaea) using scissor traps and duffus traps: a post mortem examination study

    Contributor(s):: Baker, S. E., Shaw, R. F., Atkinson, R. P. D., West, P., Macdonald, D. W.

    Moles are widely trapped as pests on farms and amenity land in Britain. Spring traps for killing mammals generally require welfare approval in the UK, but mole traps are exempt. Previous research demonstrated wide variation in the mechanical performance of mole traps. In this context, we aimed to...

  9. Rat aversion to sevoflurane and isoflurane

    Contributor(s):: Bertolus, J. B., Nemeth, G., Makowska, I. J., Weary, D. M.

    Virtually all rodents used in research are eventually euthanized. Best practice is to anaesthetize these animals before euthanasia using a halogenated anaesthetic such as isoflurane. Exposure to isoflurane is aversive, but less so than exposure to the commonly used carbon dioxide. Sevoflurane is...

  10. Testing three measures of mouse insensibility following induction with isoflurane or carbon dioxide gas for a more humane euthanasia

    Contributor(s):: Moody, C. M., Makowska, I. J., Weary, D. M.

    Laboratory mice are commonly killed via exposure to gradually increasing concentrations of isoflurane and carbon dioxide (CO 2) gas. Once rendered insensible using isoflurane or CO 2, a high concentration of CO 2 is used to decrease time to death. When the switch from isoflurane to a high flow...

  11. The effects of witnessing managemental procedures during the light versus the dark phase of the light cycle on behaviour, performance and welfare of laboratory rats

    Contributor(s):: Abou-Ismail, U. A., Mohamed, R. A., El-Kholya, S. Z.

    Research has indicated that witnessing managemental procedures are stressful to laboratory rats. Yet there has been little investigation into whether the time of witnessing these procedures affects behaviour and welfare in these animals. Ninety-six rats, representing two batches, were used in...

  12. The power of automated behavioural homecage technologies in characterizing disease progression in laboratory mice: a review

    Contributor(s):: Richardson, C. A.

    Behavioural changes that occur as animals become sick have been characterized in a number of species and include the less frequent occurrence of 'luxury behaviours' such as playing, grooming and socialization. 'Sickness behaviours' or behavioural changes following exposure to infectious agents,...

  13. Proceedings of the first International Conference on Veterinary Behavioural Medicine

    Contributor(s):: Daniel Mills, S.E. Heath, L.J. Harrington

    This collection of papers is the Proceedings of the First International Conference on Veterinary Behavioural Medicine which was held, under the auspices of the Companion Animal Behaviour Therapy Study Group and the European Society of Veterinary Clinical Ethology, in Birmingham UK on the 1st and...

  14. Domestication effects on behavioural traits and learning performance: comparing wild cavies to guinea pigs

    Contributor(s):: Brust, V., Guenther, A.

    The domestication process leads to a change in behavioural traits, usually towards individuals that are less attentive to changes in their environment and less aggressive. Empirical evidence for a difference in cognitive performance, however, is scarce. Recently, a functional linkage between an...

  15. Housing condition and nesting experience do not affect the Time to Integrate to Nest Test (TINT)

    Contributor(s):: Rock, M. L., Karas, A. Z., Gallo, M. S., Pritchett-Corning, K., Gaskill, B. N.

    Managing and assessing well-being in laboratory mice ( Mus musculus) is both challenging and necessary. Assessments intended to detect negative welfare states in mice are usually performed via observation of animals in the home cage, but a substantial amount of time and skill may be required to...

  16. Animal welfare beyond the cage ... and beyond the evidence?

    Contributor(s):: Blanchard, R. J.

    In "Laboratory Rodent Welfare: Thinking Outside the Cage," Balcombe (2010/this issue) suggests that laboratory cage housing is damaging to rats and mice because it does not meet their evolved needs and may damage their psychological and physical health. The article also indicates that larger and...

  17. Behavioral assessment of intermittent wheel running and individual housing in mice in the laboratory

    Contributor(s):: Pham, T. M., Brene, S., Baumans, V.

    Physical cage enrichment - exercise devices for rodents in the laboratory - often includes running wheels. This study compared responses of mice in enriched physical and social conditions and in standard social conditions to wheel running, individual housing, and open-field test. The study...

  18. Do male mice prefer or avoid each other's company? Influence of hierarchy, kinship, and familiarity

    Contributor(s):: Loo, P. L. P. van, Groot, A. C. de, Zutphen, B. F. M. van, Baumans, V.

    In the laboratory, individual housing of male mice who otherwise show aggression is common practice. Because mice are a social species, the question arises whether this procedure is right from the animals' point of view. This study tested the preference of subordinate animals for their dominant...

  19. Genetic engineering and other factors that might affect human-animal interactions in the research setting

    Contributor(s):: Comber, J., Griffin, G.

    Evidence exists, particularly in the welfare literature of nonhuman animals on the farm, that the interaction between nonhuman animals and the personnel who care for them can have a strong effect on the animals' behavior, productivity, and welfare. Among species commonly used for biomedical...

  20. Is there evidence of learned helplessness in horses? (Special Issue: Equitation science.)

    Contributor(s):: Hall, C., Goodwin, D., Heleski, C., Randle, H., Waran, N.

    Learned helplessness is a psychological condition whereby individuals learn that they have no control over unpleasant or harmful conditions, that their actions are futile, and that they are helpless. In a series of experiments in which dogs were exposed to inescapable shocks, this lack of control...