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  1. Behavioral responses of nursing home residents to visits from a person with a dog, a robot seal or a toy cat

    Contributor(s):: Thodberg, K., Sorensen, L. U., Videbech, P. B., Poulsen, P. H., Houbak, B., Damgaard, V., Keseler, I., Edwards, D., Christensen, J. W.

    Previous studies suggest that contact with dogs can positively affect the wellbeing of elderly people in nursing homes, but there is a lack of research investigating the causal pathways of these effects. One such pathway may relate to the behavioral responses of the elderly when interacting with...

  2. The associations between animal-based welfare measures and the presence of indicators of food safety in finishing pigs

    Contributor(s):: Alpigiani, I., Bacci, C., Keeling, L. J., Salman, M. D., Brindani, F., Pongolini, S., Hitchens, P. L., Bonardi, S.

    Stressful housing and management practices affect animals, potentially increasing their receptiveness to pathogens. Since some pathogens do not lead to clinical signs of sickness, subclinical pigs could enter the food-chain, contaminating carcases and offal at slaughter, representing a threat to...

  3. Behavioral responses of nursing home residents to visits from a person with a dog, a robot seal or a toy cat

    Contributor(s):: Thodberg, K., Sorensen, L. U., Videbech, P. B., Poulsen, P. H., Houbak, B., Damgaard, V., Keseler, I., Edwards, D., Christensen, J. W.

    Previous studies suggest that contact with dogs can positively affect the wellbeing of elderly people in nursing homes, but there is a lack of research investigating the causal pathways of these effects. One such pathway may relate to the behavioral responses of the elderly when interacting with...

  4. Behavioral responses of nursing home residents to visits from a person with a dog, a robot seal or a toy cat

    Contributor(s):: Thodberg, K., Sorensen, L. U., Videbech, P. B., Poulsen, P. H., Houbak, B., Damgaard, V., Keseler, I., Edwards, D., Christensen, J. W.

    Previous studies suggest that contact with dogs can positively affect the wellbeing of elderly people in nursing homes, but there is a lack of research investigating the causal pathways of these effects. One such pathway may relate to the behavioral responses of the elderly when interacting with...

  5. Review of the risks of some canine zoonoses from free-roaming dogs in the post-disaster setting of Latin America

    Contributor(s):: Garde, E., Acosta-Jamett, G., Bronsvoort, B. M.

    In the absence of humane and sustainable control strategies for free-roaming dogs (FRD) and the lack of effective disaster preparedness planning in developing regions of the world, the occurrence of canine zoonoses is a potentially important yet unrecognized issue. The existence of large...

  6. Assessment of severity and progression of canine cognitive dysfunction syndrome using the CAnine DEmentia Scale (CADES)

    Contributor(s):: Madari, A., Farbakova, J., Katina, S., Smolek, T., Novak, P., Weissova, T., Novak, M., Zilka, N.

    Cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS) represents a group of symptoms related to the aging of the canine brain. These changes ultimately lead to a decline of memory function and learning abilities, alteration of social interaction, impairment of normal housetraining, changes in sleep-wake cycle and...

  7. Stereotypic mice are aggressed by their cage-mates, and tend to be poor demonstrators in social learning tasks

    Contributor(s):: Harper, L., Choleris, E., Ervin, K., Fureix, C., Reynolds, K., Walker, M., Mason, G.

    Stereotypic behaviours (SBs) are linked with behavioural inflexibility and resemble symptoms of autism, suggesting that stereotypic animals could have autistic-like social impairments. SBs are also common in caged mice. We therefore hypothesised relationships between stereotypic and social...

  8. Investigating anhedonia in a non-conventional species: do some riding horses Equus caballus display symptoms of depression?

    Contributor(s):: Fureix, C., Beaulieu, C., Argaud, S., Rochais, C., Quinton, M., Henry, S., Hausberger, M., Mason, G.

    Investigating depression-like conditions in animals is methodologically challenging, but potentially important for welfare. Some riding horses display 'withdrawn' states of inactivity and low responsiveness that resemble the reduced engagement with the environment shown by certain depressed...

  9. Benefits of dog ownership: comparative study of equivalent samples

    Contributor(s):: Gonzalez Ramirez, M. T., Landero Hernandez, R.

    Owing to the inconclusive findings of research regarding the health benefits of pet ownership, we compared perceived health, stress, life satisfaction, happiness, and psychosomatic symptoms in dog owners and non-dog owners. As an attempt to overcome some earlier methodological issues, the sample...

  10. Acceptability of animal-assisted therapy: attitudes toward AAT, psychotherapy, and medication for the treatment of child disruptive behavioral problems

    Contributor(s):: Rabbitt, S. M., Kazdin, A. E., Hong, J.

    Animal-assisted therapies (AATs) are not widely promoted in routine mental healthcare but represent a viable treatment option given positive perceptions of pets and growing evidence that animals provide meaningful contribution to psychological wellbeing. Relatively little is known about the...

  11. Are therapy dogs like xanax? Does animal-assisted therapy impact processes relevant to cognitive behavioral psychotherapy?

    Contributor(s):: Hunt, M. G., Chizkov, R. R.

    Despite an increase in the popularity of animal-assisted therapy, little is known about the impact of animals on processes relevant to effective psychotherapy. This study tested the impact of having a dog present on process variables relevant to cognitive behavioral therapy, including emotional...

  12. "Nudging them back to reality": toward a growing public acceptance of the role dogs fulfill in ameliorating contemporary veterans' PTSD symptoms

    Contributor(s):: Taylor, M. F., Edwards, M. E., Pooley, J. A.

  13. A report of capture myopathy in the Tasmanian pademelon ( Thylogale billardierii)

    Contributor(s):: McMahon, C. R., Wiggins, N. L., French, V., McCallum, H. I., Bowman, D.

  14. Assessment of stun quality at commercial slaughter in cattle shot with captive bolt

    Contributor(s):: Atkinson, S., Velarde, A., Algers, B.

  15. Assessment time of the Welfare Quality protocol for dairy cattle

    Contributor(s):: Vries, M. de, Engel, B., Uijl, I. den, Schaik, G. van, Dijkstra, T., Boer, I. de, Bokkers, E. A. M.

  16. Assessing pig welfare at stunning in Swedish commercial abattoirs using CO<sub>2</sub> group-stun methods

    Contributor(s):: Atkinson, S., Velarde, A., Llonch, P., Algers, B.

  17. Interactions between handler well-being and canine health and behavior in search and rescue teams

    Contributor(s):: Hunt, M., Otto, C. M., Serpell, J. A., Alvarez, J.

  18. The influence of animals on the development of children

    Contributor(s):: Endenburg, N., Lith, H. A. van

    There is a widespread belief that interaction with an animal is beneficial for the development of children, and several studies (most with methodological shortcomings) have investigated the influence of (companion) animals on the social-emotional and cognitive development of children. In this...

  19. Non conventional psychiatric rehabilitation in schizophrenia using therapeutic riding: the FISE multicentre Pindar project

    Contributor(s):: Stefania Cerino, Francesca Cirulli, Flavia Chiarotti, Stefano Seripa

    The FISE (Federazione Italiana Sport Equestri) Pindar is a multicentre research project aimed at testing the potential effects of therapeutic riding on schizophrenic patients. Twenty-four subjects with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were enrolled for a 1 year-treatment involving therapeutic riding...

  20. Rats show aversion to argon-induced hypoxia

    Contributor(s):: Makowska, I. J., Niel, L., Kirkden, R. D., Weary, D. M.

    Laboratory rats and mice are commonly killed using carbon dioxide gas. However, recent studies have shown that rodents find this gas aversive. Argon is a tasteless and odourless gas that causes hypoxia by displacing air. The aim of the present study was to use approach-avoidance testing to...