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All Categories (1-19 of 19)

  1. A systematic review of zoonoses transmission and livestock/wildlife interactions: Preliminary findings

    Contributor(s):: Delia Grace, R. Kock, J. Rushton, F. Mutua, J.J. McDermott, D.U. Pfeiffer, B. Jones

    Around 60% of all human pathogens are zoonoses and domestic animals and wildlife are of equal importance as reservoir hosts. Moreover, most emerging infectious diseases are zoonoses and most emerge from wildlife. There have been several recent initiatives to categorize zoonoses and their...

  2. Sero-epidemiological and haematological studies on toxoplasmosis in cats,dogs and their owners in Lahore, Pakistan

    Contributor(s):: Azeem Shahzad, Muhammad Sarwar Khan, Kamran Ashraf, Muhammad Avais, Khalid Pervez, Jawaria Ali Khan

    The current study was conducted to find out the epidemiological status of toxoplasmosis in cats, dogs and human population in Lahore city of Pakistan and to determine the possibility of transmission of toxoplasmosis from cats and dogs to their owners. Overall 56% cats were seropositive for...

  3. Warm-Blooded Animal Bites

    Contributor(s):: R.a. Dieter Jr., Robert S. Dieter, R.a. Dieter Iii, D.L. Dieter

    Background: Domestic animals are the major cause of warm-blooded  animal bites around the world. The dog, the cat and human bites are the  most common animal bites creating major medical and health care  concerns requiring medical treatment. Transmitted zoonotic diseases...

  4. Knowledge and attitude towards zoonoses among animal health workers and livestock keepers in Arusha and Tanga, Tanzania

    Contributor(s):: Emanuel S. Swai, Luuk Schoonman, Chris Daborn

    Zoonoses are infections naturally transmitted between vertebrate animals and humans. An exploratory questionnaire-based survey of animal health workers(n=36) and livestock keepers(n=43)was carried out from April 2001 to March 2002 in Tanga and Arusha regions, northern Tanzania, to assess local...

  5. A review of cat behavior in relation to disease risk and management options

    Contributor(s):: Lepczyk, C. A., Lohr, C. A., Duffy, D. C.

    Domestic cats ( Felis catus) are a common household pet and also a notorious invasive species around the world. Because cat numbers have been increasing in many locations it is critical to work on management solutions that help to reduce threats posed by cats. With regard to cat behavior, one of...

  6. Best practices for planning events encouraging human-animal interactions

    Contributor(s):: Erdozain, G., Kukanich, K., Chapman, B., Powell, D.

    Educational events encouraging human-animal interaction include the risk of zoonotic disease transmission. It is estimated that 14% of all disease in the USA caused by Campylobacter spp., Cryptosporidium spp., Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157, non-O157 STECs, Listeria...

  7. Plague: infections of companion animals and opportunities for intervention

    Contributor(s):: Oyston, Petra C. F., Williamson, Diane

  8. Zoonoses: Animal to human diseases

    Contributor(s):: E. Fevre, D. Grace

    This resource is a media briefing regarding the control of zoonotic diseases, the Bird Flu outbreak in China, and the connection between urban agriculture and human health.

  9. Mapping of poverty and likely zoonoses hotspots

    Contributor(s):: D. Grace, F. Mutua, P. Ochungo, R. Kruska, K. Jones, L. Brierley, L. Lapar, M. Said, M. Herrero, P.M. Phuc, N.B. Thao, I. Akuku, F. Ogutu

    The objective of this report is to present data and expert knowledge on poverty and zoonoses hotspots to inform prioritisation of study areas on the transmission of disease in emerging livestock systems in the developing world, where prevention of zoonotic disease might bring greatest benefit to...

  10. H7N9 ia a virus worth worrying about

    | Contributor(s):: P. Horby, A.J. Tatem, Z. Huang, M. Gilbert, T.P. Robinson, G.R.W. Wint, F.G. Hayden, N. van Vinh Chau, N. Shindo, G. Carson, Z. Gao, Y. Hongjie, S.I. Hay, J. Farrar

    Once again an animal influenza A virus has crossed the species barrier to cause an appreciable number of human cases. Now, two months after the first known human infections with the H7N9 virus, the question is: which of the paths set by previous emerging influenza viruses will it follow? One...

  11. Zoonotic Disease in Ohio: Surveillance, Preparation, and Response

    | Contributor(s):: Erik B. Balster

    This paper examines the state of public health preparation and response capacity to zoonotic infectious disease in the state of Ohio. A comprehensive literature review of zoonotic disease emergence and re-emergence, the National Veterinary Stockpile (NVS), the One Health Initiative, emergency...

  12. Prevalence of Potential Zoonotic Enteric Bacterial Pathogens in Dogs and Cats and Factors Associated with Potential Transmission Between Animals and Humans

    | Contributor(s):: Omaima Maamoun Ahmed

    With the discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), concerns about dangers of pet ownership have increased. Zoonotic organisms associated with cats and dogs, may cause life-threatening infections in immuosuppressed human beings. The...

  13. Characterization of injuries caused by dogs and cats to humans in the municipality of Jaboticabal, Sao Paulo, between the years 2000 and 2009

    | Contributor(s):: Frias, D. F. R., Nunes, J. O. R., Carvalho, A. A. B.

  14. The human-animal interface of domestic livestock management and production and its relationship to brucellosis in the country of Georgia 2010: a rapid assessment analysis

    | Contributor(s):: Havas, K. A., Ramishvili, M., Navdarashvili, A., Imnadze, P., Salman, M.

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in resident animals of a long-term care facility

    | Contributor(s):: Coughlan, K., Olsen, K. E., Boxrud, D., Bender, J. B.

    Animals provide benefits to elderly and chronically ill people by decreasing loneliness, increasing social interactions, and improving mental health. As a result, many hospitals and long-term care facilities allow family pets to visit ill or convalescing patients or support animal-assisted...

  16. All creatures great and minute: a public policy primer for companion animal zoonoses

    | Contributor(s):: Reaser, J. K., Clark, E. E., Jr., Meyers, N. M.

    Approximately 63% of US households have at least one pet, a large percentage of which are considered family members. Pet owners can derive substantial physical and psychological benefits from interaction with companion animals. However, pet ownership is not without risks; zoonotic diseases are...

  17. Sickness behaviour and its relevance to animal welfare assessment at the group level

    | Contributor(s):: Millman, S. T.

    The inflammatory response evokes changes in behaviour including increased thermoregulatory activities and sleep, reduced social exploration and appetite, and altered food preferences. This sickness response also includes feelings of lethargy, depression, and pain, collectively referred to as...

  18. The effect of essential oils showing acaricidal activity against the poultry red mite ( Dermanyssus gallinae ) on aspects of welfare and production of laying hens

    | Contributor(s):: George, Sparagano, O. A. E., Port, G., Okello, E., Shiel, R. S., Guy, J. H.

    The poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) causes severe welfare concerns for laying hens arising from anaemia and disease transmission, and has been identified as an associated risk factor in cannibalistic feather pecking. Previous work suggests that essential oils may offer an alternative to...

  19. Wild animal conservation and welfare in agricultural systems. (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    | Contributor(s):: Mathews, F.

    At least one-third of the land on earth is used for agricultural production and conflicts with the interests of wildlife are inevitable. These conflicts are likely to escalate as the human population expands and as the scale and intensity of agricultural production increases. This paper argues...