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  1. Food puzzles for cats: feeding for physical and emotional wellbeing

    Contributor(s):: Dantas, L. M. S., Delgado, M. M., Johnson, I., Buffington, C. A. T.

    Practical relevance: Many pet cats are kept indoors for a variety of reasons (eg, safety, health, avoidance of wildlife predation) in conditions that are perhaps the least natural to them. Indoor housing has been associated with health issues, such as chronic lower urinary tract signs, and...

  2. Experimental verification of the effects on normal domestic cats by feeding prescription diet for decreasing stress

    Contributor(s):: Miyaji, K., Kato, M., Ohtani, N., Ohta, M.

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of diet on the feline stress response by measuring plasma and urinary cortisol. A study diet was developed with a unique combination of nutrients that supports the management of stressful situations. The specific formulation of the diet...

  3. Rooting area and drinker affect dunging behaviour of organic pigs

    Contributor(s):: Vermeer, H. M., Altena, H., Vereijken, P. F. G., Bracke, M. B. M.

    Hygiene is a common problem on outdoor runs of growing organic pigs. Manure and urine are mainly excreted outdoors and tend to spread all over the run. Reducing the soiled surface area may be beneficial to animal welfare, hygiene, ammonia emissions and labour, not only in organic but also in...

  4. Behavioral and hormonal consequences of transporting giant pandas from China to the United States

    Contributor(s):: Snyder, R. J., Perdue, B. M., Powell, D. M., Forthman, D. L., Bloomsmith, M. A., Maple, T. L.

    Zoological institutions strive to ensure the welfare of nonhuman animals in captivity. Part of this effort involves reducing the level of distress experienced by an animal to the greatest extent possible. However, some necessary zoo management practices such as transportation induce stress...

  5. Effects of training on stress-related behavior of the common marmoset ( Callithrix jacchus ) in relation to coping with routine husbandry procedures. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Bassett, L., Buchanan-Smith, H. M., McKinley, J., Smith, T. E.

    Using positive reinforcement, 12 common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were trained to provide urine samples on request. The marmosets were exposed to mildly stressful, routine husbandry procedures (i.e., capture and weighing). The non-human animals spent less time inactive poststressor as...

  6. Hydration state of goats transported by road for 12 hours during the hot-dry conditions and the modulating role of ascorbic acid

    Contributor(s):: Minka, S. N., Ayo, J. O.

    This study investigated the effects of 12 hr of road transportation during the hot-dry conditions and the modulating role of ascorbic acid (AA) on the hydration state of goats. Twenty goats who served as treatment goats received oral administration of 100 mg/kg body weight of AA, whereas another...

  7. There's a rat in my room! Now what? Mice show no chronic physiological response to the presence of rats

    Contributor(s):: Meijer, M. K., Loo, P. L. P. van, Baumans, V.

    In general, guidelines on housing and care of animals in the laboratory state that rats and mice should not be housed in the same room. Mice may perceive rats as predators. Although one theory says this can cause stress, there is little scientific evidence to support this theory. In the wild,...

  8. Urinary corticosterone levels in mice in response to intraperitoneal injections with saline

    Contributor(s):: Meijer, M. K., Lemmens, A. G., Zutphen, B. F. M. van, Baumans, V.

    The concept of refinement is an important issue in the field of laboratory animal science. Refinement-based research aims to improve animal welfare, to increase the reliability of experimental outcome, and to diminish variation. In search of refinement of experimental techniques, this study...

  9. Use of accelerometers to measure stress levels in shelter dogs

    Contributor(s):: Jones, S., Dowling-Guyer, S., Patronek, G. J., Marder, A. R., D'Arpino, S. S., McCobb, E.

    Stress can compromise welfare in any confined group of nonhuman animals, including those in shelters. However, an objective and practical method for assessing the stress levels of individual dogs housed in a shelter does not exist. Such a method would be useful for monitoring animal welfare and...

  10. Human-animal interactions and animal welfare in conventionally and pen-housed rats

    Contributor(s):: Augustsson, H., Lindberg, L., Hoglund, A. U., Dahlborn, K.

    The main aim of the present study was to explore the significance of large group/greater pen housing (PH) versus standard Makrolon caging (ST) in three behaviour tests related to human-animal interactions in the adult male laboratory rat. The rats' perception of human interaction was tested in...

  11. Stereotypies and cortisol secretion in heifers subjected to tethering

    Contributor(s):: Redbo, I.

    The aims of this study were to assess the effect of tethering on environmentally induced stereotypies and urine cortisol concentrations in Swedish Red and White heifers, and to analyse a possible relationship between the performance of stereotypies and cortisol concentration. Three groups of...

  12. The influence of early sucking experience on the occurrence of preputial sucking in veal calves

    Contributor(s):: Wilt, J. G. de

  13. To swim or not to swim: an interpretation of farmed mink's motivation for a water bath

    Contributor(s):: Vinke, C. M., Hansen, S. W., Mononen, J., Korhonen, H., Cooper, J. J., Mohaibes, M., Bakken, M., Spruijt, B. M.

    How an animal's behavioural needs can be met is a pivotal issue in the assessment of welfare for captive animals. The value of swimming water for farmed mink is an example of how scientific and societal questions relating to animal welfare can be answered. A number of studies have addressed the...

  14. The maintenance behaviour and cleanliness of pigs in two-tier weaner decks

    Contributor(s):: Lewis, N. J., Christison, G. I.

    Tiered weaner decks for pigs appear to have a major disadvantage because the faeces and urine from the pigs in the top pens drop through to the pigs in the lower pens. This may affect the well-being of these pigs and may cause the development of poor dunging habits. To determine the general...

  15. Behavioural and physiological measures of welfare of pregnant mares fitted with a novel urine collection device

    Contributor(s):: Jongman, E. C., Bidstrup, I., Hemsworth, P. H.

    An alternative collection procedure for pregnant mare urine (PMU) has been developed in Australia, which allows mares to be loose housed either in indoor stables or outdoors in paddocks, rather than in tether stalls as is common practice in Canada and North Dakota. The present study examined the...

  16. The importance of exposure to other male scents in determining competitive behaviour among inbred male mice

    Contributor(s):: Lacey, J. C., Beynon, R. J., Hurst, J. L.

    Inbred mouse strains are homozygous at almost all loci, with individuals of the same strain expressing the same genetically determined scents that would normally provide individuals with their own unique scent. As laboratory mice are normally housed with others of the same strain in a simple and...

  17. Characterising the emotional reactivity of cows to understand and predict their stress reactions to the slaughter procedure

    Contributor(s):: Bourguet, C., Deiss, V., Gobert, M., Durand, D., Boissy, A., Terlouw, E. M. C.

    The present study on 32 Normand cows evaluated whether it is possible to identify, during rearing, individuals likely to be relatively reactive to the slaughter procedure. It evaluated further which factors may contribute to stress during the pre-slaughter period. Behavioural and physiological...

  18. A review of mulesing and other methods to control flystrike (cutaneous myiasis) in sheep

    Contributor(s):: Phillips, C. J. C.

    Flystrike (cutaneous myiasis) in sheep has the potential to have a major impact on the welfare of significant numbers of sheep worldwide, but particularly in Australia. The main control method used in Australia, the mulesing operation to remove folds of skin from the hindquarters of the sheep, is...

  19. Alarm pheromones in urine modify the behaviour of weaner pigs

    Contributor(s):: Amory, J. R., Pearce, G. P.

    Pigs undergoing an alarming experience may produce olfactory stimuli (pheromones) in their urine, which may have consequences for the welfare of other pigs exposed to these stimuli. 12 young adult female pigs (gilts) were restrained for 30 min in feeding stalls (a potentially alarming experience)...

  20. Changes in ear-pinna temperature as a useful measure of stress in sheep ( ovis aries )

    Contributor(s):: Lowe, T. E., Cook, C. J., Ingram, J. R., Harris, P. J.

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system, with associated increases in heart rate and the redistribution of blood in preparation for 'fight or flight', is an integral part of the 'defence reaction'. In sheep, the defence reaction involves vasoconstriction in the ear-pinna. If decreases in...