You are here: Home / Tags / wildlife management + Developed countries / All Categories

Tags: wildlife management + Developed countries

All Categories (1-20 of 20)

  1. Human-cat relationship in an oceanic biosphere reserve: the case of La Palma Island, Canary archipelago

    Contributor(s):: Medina, F. M., Nogales, M., Farnworth, M. J., Bonnaud, E.

    Removal of feral cats from island environments is a useful mechanism by which their ecological impact on endangered species can be reduced or ended. Nevertheless, because cats are anthropogenic in their origins, social perceptions of management practices play a large role in their implementation....

  2. Pet ownership, attitude toward pets, and support for wildlife management strategies

    Contributor(s):: Shuttlewood, C. Z., Greenwell, P. J., Montrose, V. T.

    Pet ownership affects engagement with animal-related activities and may be related to support of wildlife management. British participants ( N=220) completed an online survey providing information on pet ownership, attitudes toward pets, and support for wildlife management strategies. Within this...

  3. "There is no wild": conservation and circus discourse

    Contributor(s):: Bell, J.

    This paper documents the discourse used by contemporary circuses to justify their exploitation of nonhuman animals. The circus is undergoing redefinition due to cultural changes, animal welfare concerns, and political legislation. Critical Discourse Analysis is applied to a sample of articles (...

  4. Potential welfare impacts of kill-trapping European moles ( Talpa europaea) using scissor traps and duffus traps: a post mortem examination study

    Contributor(s):: Baker, S. E., Shaw, R. F., Atkinson, R. P. D., West, P., Macdonald, D. W.

    Moles are widely trapped as pests on farms and amenity land in Britain. Spring traps for killing mammals generally require welfare approval in the UK, but mole traps are exempt. Previous research demonstrated wide variation in the mechanical performance of mole traps. In this context, we aimed to...

  5. Survival of bottlenose dolphin ( Tursiops sp.) calves at a wild dolphin provisioning program, Tangalooma, Australia

    Contributor(s):: Neil, D. T., Holmes, B. J.

    Mortality of calves born to provisioned mothers is identified in the literature as an issue of concern in dolphin provisioning programs. Wild dolphin provisioning at Tangalooma, Moreton Island, Australia has been occurring since 1992. Each evening, up to eight dolphins are provided with fish in a...

  6. Wildlife value orientations in the Netherlands. (Special issue. Cross-cultural wildlife value orientations)

    Contributor(s):: Jacobs, M. H.

    Wildlife value orientations among inhabitants of the Netherlands were explored by conducting semi-structured interviews, and using predefined value orientations that were previously revealed in the United States. Special attention was paid to the existence of mutualism orientations, viewing...

  7. Encounters on the frontier: Banteng in Australia's Northern Territory

    Contributor(s):: deKoninck, V.

    This paper considers the case of an introduced species that resides in what is now a jointly managed national park in the north of tropical Australia. Banteng ( Bos javanicus) are a peculiar feral nonhuman animal in that they constitute a potential environmental threat within the domestic...

  8. A report of capture myopathy in the Tasmanian pademelon ( Thylogale billardierii)

    Contributor(s):: McMahon, C. R., Wiggins, N. L., French, V., McCallum, H. I., Bowman, D.

  9. Patterns of human-coyote conflicts in the Denver Metropolitan Area

    Contributor(s):: Poessel, S. A., Breck, S. W., Teel, T. L., Shwiff, S., Crooks, K. R., Angeloni, L.

  10. The relevance of age and gender for public attitudes to brown bears ( Ursus arctos), black bears ( Ursus americanus), and cougars ( Puma concolor) in Kamloops, British Columbia

    Contributor(s):: Campbell, M. O.

  11. When wildlife tourism goes wrong: a case study of stakeholder and management issues regarding Dingoes on Fraser Island, Australia

    Contributor(s):: Burns, G. L., Howard, P.

    Images on brochures, web pages and postcards lead to an expectation by tourists and visitors that interaction with Dingoes (Canis lupus Dingo) will be part of their Fraser Island experience in Australia. However, as the number of tourists to the island increase, so do the reports of Dingo...

  12. Latitudinal variation in diet and patterns of human interaction in the marine otter

    Contributor(s):: Mangel, J. C., Whitty, T., Medina-Vogel, G., Alfaro-Shigueto, J., Caceres, C., Godley, B. J.

    The marine otter (Lontra felina) inhabits patches of rocky coastline from central Peru to southern Chile and is classified as Endangered by the IUCN. Given the limited information available about the species, we set out to assess marine otter diet with a view to detecting latitudinal differences,...

  13. Convergence of culture, ecology, and ethics: management of feral swamp buffalo in Northern Australia

    Contributor(s):: Albrecht, G., McMahon, C. R., Bowman, D. M. J. S., Bradshaw, C. J. A.

    This paper examines the identity of Asian swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) from different value orientations. Buffalo were introduced into Northern (Top End) Australia in the early nineteenth century. A team of transdisciplinary researchers, including an ethicist, has been engaged in field...

  14. Indicators of biodiversity and conservational wildlife quality on Danish organic farms for use in farm management: a multidisciplinary approach to indicator development and testing

    Contributor(s):: Noe, E., Halberg, N., Reddersen, J.

    Organic farming is expected to contribute to conserving national biodiversity on farms, especially remnant, old, and undisturbed small biotopes, forests, and permanent grassland. This objective cannot rely on the legislation of organic farming solely, and to succeed, farmers need to understand...

  15. Interactions between visitors and Formosan macaques ( Macaca cyclopis ) at Shou-Shan Nature Park, Taiwan

    Contributor(s):: Hsu, M. J., Kao, ChienChing, Agoramoorthy, G.

    Ecotourism involving feeding wildlife has raised public attention and is a controversial issue, especially concerning nonhuman primates. Between July 2002 and April 2005, the behavior of monkeys and tourists was collected through scan samplings, focal samplings and behavior samplings at the...

  16. Survival, fecundity, and movements of free-roaming cats

    Contributor(s):: Schmidt, P. M., Lopez, R. R., Collier, B. A.

    Free-roaming cats (e.g., owned, semi-feral, and feral) impact wildlife worldwide through predation, competition, and disease transmission. Baseline ecological information necessary for population management is lacking. We radiocollared free-roaming cats (feral, n=30; semi-feral, n=14; owned,...

  17. Developing fish passage and protection at hydropower dams. (Special issue: Fish Behaviour and Welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Schilt, C. R.

    The development of waterways, for hydropower and other industrial uses, has substantially altered many of the freshwater habitats of the planet and this has had considerable impact upon aquatic organisms. Industrial changes in aquatic ecosystems, including hydropower development, can restrict or...

  18. Feral pigs in Hawai'i: using behavior and ecology to refine control techniques

    Contributor(s):: Nogueira, S. S. da C., Nogueira Filho, S. L. G., Bassford, M., Silvius, K., Fragoso, J. M. V.

    Early Polynesians settlers were the first to introduce pigs to the Hawaiian Islands. Later Captain Cook brought European pigs during his first voyage to Hawai'i. Many other importations have followed. Animals from these introductions became feral and dispersed throughout the islands. Free-ranging...

  19. The efficacy of collar-mounted devices in reducing the rate of predation of wildlife by domestic cats

    Contributor(s):: Nelson, S. H., Evans, A. D., Bradbury, R. B.

    Volunteer cat owners from across the UK were recruited to take part in two trials designed to test the efficacy of collar-mounted warning devices in reducing cat predation rates of native wildlife. Cats equipped with a bell returned 34% fewer mammals and 41% fewer birds than those with a plain...

  20. Countering brutality to wildlife, relationism and ethics: conservation, welfare and the 'ecoversity'. (Special issue: Minding animals: Emerging issues concerning our relationships with other animals.)

    Contributor(s):: Garlick, S., Matthews, J., Carter, J.

    Wildlife objectification and cruelty are everyday aspects of Australian society that eschew values of human kindness, empathy, and an understanding of the uniqueness and importance of non-human life in the natural world. Fostered by institutional failure, greed and selfishness, and the worst...