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Tags: Wolves + Animal behavior

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  1. Training Reduces Stress in Human-Socialised Wolves to the Same Degree as in Dogs

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Angélica da Silva Vasconcellos, Zsófia Virányi, Friederike Range, César Ades, Jördis Kristin Scheidegger, Erich Möstl, Kurt Kotrschal

    The welfare of animals in captivity is of considerable societal concern. A major source of stress, especially for wild animals, is the lack of control over their environment, which includes not being able to avoid contact with human beings. Paradoxically, some studies have shown that...

  2. Dog breed differences in visual communication with humans

    | Contributor(s):: Konno, A., Romero, T., Inoue-Murayama, M., Saito, A., Hasegawa, T.

    Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have developed a close relationship with humans through the process of domestication. In human-dog interactions, eye contact is a key element of relationship initiation and maintenance. Previous studies have suggested that canine ability to produce human-directed...

  3. The Dog: A Domestic Wolf to Communicate with Man: The Aggressiveness of the Dog

    | Contributor(s):: Jean-Mane Giffroy

    On the basis of research in archeozoology and molecular genetics, it is established that the wolf is the main ancestor of the dog and that domestication would have occurred some 14,000 or 15,000 years ago, 5,000 years before the domestication of another species. The place or places of the first...

  4. When dogs look back: inhibition of independent problem-solving behaviour in domestic dogs ( Canis lupus familiaris) compared with wolves ( Canis lupus)

    | Contributor(s):: Udell, M. A. R.

    Domestic dogs have been recognized for their social sensitivity and aptitude in human-guided tasks. For example, prior studies have demonstrated that dogs look to humans when confronted with an unsolvable task; an action often interpreted as soliciting necessary help. Conversely, wolves persist...

  5. Dogs for herding and guarding livestock

    | Contributor(s):: Coppinger, L., Coppinger, R., Grandin, T.

    Dogs that perform best for guarding and herding livestock have different behavioural profiles, as stated by the authors: 'herding dogs are selected to show hunting behaviours, such as eye, stalk, grip or heel. Guarding dogs are selected to show more of the wild ancestor's puppy-like or juvenile...

  6. A comparison of pet and purpose-bred research dog ( Canis familiaris) performance on human-guided object-choice tasks

    | Contributor(s):: Lazarowski, L., Dorman, D. C.

    Several studies have shown that domestic dogs respond to human social cues such as pointing. Some experiments have shown that pet dogs outperformed wolves in following a momentary distal point. These findings have lent support to the hypothesis that domestication is responsible for domestic dogs'...

  7. A fresh look at the wolf-pack theory of companion-animal dog social behavior

    | Contributor(s):: Kerkhove, W. van

    A popular perspective on the social behavior of dogs in multiple-dog households sees the dogs' behavior as reflecting the sociobiological laws of the rigidly structured dominance hierarchy that has been described for wolf packs. This view suggests that aggression problems among dogs are natural...

  8. The concept of dominance and the treatment of aggression in multidog homes: a comment on van Kerkhove's commentary

    | Contributor(s):: Mertens, P. A.

    Comment on "van Kerkhove's Commentary" [2004 this issue] relating to the concept of dominance and the treatment of aggression in multidog homes.

  9. Traumatic stress disorder observed in an adult wild captive wolf ( Canis lupus )

    | Contributor(s):: Mallonee, J. S., Joslin, P.

    Tenino was an adult female wolf, born in the wild and placed into captivity at 1 year of age because of her participation in livestock depredation. Her method of capture, well documented, involved being darted twice by helicopter and translocated twice. This method of capture would have exposed...

  10. A pilot study of sexual dimorphism in the head morphology of domestic dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Carrasco, J. J., Georgevsky, D., Valenzuela, M., McGreevy, P. D.

    The dog ( Canis lupus familiaris) displays more morphological diversity than any other species. It is a direct descendant of the gray wolf ( Canis lupus), but shows remarkable behavioral and morphological differences. It has been suggested that differences in skull shape that relate to brain...

  11. Clinical feasibility of cognitive testing in dogs ( Canis lupus familiaris)

    | Contributor(s):: Heckler, M. C. T., Tranquilim, M. V., Svicero, D. J., Barbosa, L., Amorim, R. M.

    Several cognitive tests have been developed to evaluate specific aspects of human and animal learning and memory. These tests have been used for early detection of cognitive deficits and to monitor the treatment of dogs with cognitive impairment. Thus, this article evaluated the feasibility of...

  12. The effect of breed on age-related changes in behavior and disease prevalence in cognitively normal older community dogs, Canis lupus familiaris

    | Contributor(s):: Salvin, H. E., McGreevy, P. D., Sachdev, P. S., Valenzuela, M. J.

    Variation in breed longevity in the dog has led to the inference that large dogs age at a faster rate than small dogs, possibly because of an increased oxidative load. Potential differences in behavioral aging (the rate of age-related decline in cognito-behavioral performance) across breeds...

  13. The domestication of social cognition in dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Hare, B., Brown, M., Williamson, C., Tomasello, M.

    Dogs are more skillful than great apes at a number of tasks in which they must read human communicative signals indicating the location of hidden food. In this study, we found that wolves who were raised by humans do not show these same skills, whereas domestic dog puppies only a few weeks old,...

  14. Artificial illumination reduces bait-take by small rainforest mammals

    | Contributor(s):: Bengsen, A. J., Leung, L. K. P., Lapidge, S. J., Gordon, I. J.

    Small mammals often moderate their foraging behaviour in response to cues indicating a high local predation risk. We assessed the ability of cues associated with a high predation risk to reduce the consumption of bait by non-target small mammal species in a tropical rainforest, without inhibiting...

  15. Attachment to humans: a comparative study on hand-reared wolves and differently socialized dog puppies

    | Contributor(s):: Topal, J., Gacsi, M., Miklosi, A., Viranyi, Z., Kubinyi, E., Csanyi, V.

  16. A comparative approach to the study of Keeper-Animal Relationships in the zoo. (Special Issue: Zoo animal welfare.)

    | Contributor(s):: Carlstead, K.

    Research on intensively farmed animals over the past 25 years has shown that human-animal interactions, by affecting the animal's fear of humans, can markedly limit the productivity and welfare of farm animals. This article begins to explore some of the factors that need to be considered to...

  17. Perspectives on domestication: the history of our relationship with man's best friend

    | Contributor(s):: Case, L.

    We are a nation of dog lovers. Never before in our history have we spent more time, money, and emotional energy on a group of animals that are kept solely for companionship. Pet food sales are a multi-billion dollar industry, and pet owners are spending more than 11 billion dollars each year on...

  18. On the effects of domestication on canine social development and behavior

    | Contributor(s):: Frank, H., Frank, M. G.

  19. A note on the use of GPS collars to monitor wild maned wolves Chrysocyon brachyurus (Illiger 1815) (Mammalia, Canidae)

    | Contributor(s):: Coelho, C. M., Melo, L. F. B. de, Sabato, M. A. L., Rizel, D. N., Young, R. J.

    Increasingly, problems of animal conservation are being solved with the aid of technology. One recent advance in monitoring the spatial location of wild animals is the GPS collar. In this study we evaluate the use of such technology with three wild maned wolves. In a period of 155 days our three...

  20. Ambivalent signals during agonistic interactions in a captive wolf pack

    | Contributor(s):: Fatjo, J., Feddersen-Petersen, D., Ruiz de la Torre, J. L., Amat, M., Mets, M., Braus, B., Manteca, X.

    A study was designed to quantify ambivalent behaviour during social aggressive interactions in wolves. Agonistic interactions in a group of six European captive wolves, consisting of three males and three females, were analyzed for bared teeth, body posture and the position of ears, tongue, lips,...