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  1. Evolution of facial muscle anatomy in dogs

    Contributor(s):: Kaminski, J., Waller, B. M., Diogo, R., Hartstone-Rose, A., Burrows, A. M.

    Domestication shaped wolves into dogs and transformed both their behavior and their anatomy. Here we show that, in only 33,000 y, domestication transformed the facial muscle anatomy of dogs specifically for facial communication with humans. Based on dissections of dog and wolf heads, we show that...

  2. Training Reduces Stress in Human-Socialised Wolves to the Same Degree as in Dogs

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Angélica da Silva Vasconcellos, Zsófia Virányi, Friederike Range, César Ades, Jördis Kristin Scheidegger, Erich Möstl, Kurt Kotrschal

    The welfare of animals in captivity is of considerable societal concern. A major source of stress, especially for wild animals, is the lack of control over their environment, which includes not being able to avoid contact with human beings. Paradoxically, some studies have shown that...

  3. How Wolves Turned into Dogs and How Dogs Are Valuable in Meeting Human Social Needs

    | Contributor(s):: Kurt Kotrschal

    A wealth of recent behavioral, neurobiological, and genetic results allows us to draw a new, comprehensive picture of the human-wolf-dog relationship. Dogs originated from wolves 35,000 years ago, mainly via selection for tameness. Wolves were probably spiritual partners and hunting buddies of...

  4. Dog breed differences in visual communication with humans

    | Contributor(s):: Konno, A., Romero, T., Inoue-Murayama, M., Saito, A., Hasegawa, T.

    Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have developed a close relationship with humans through the process of domestication. In human-dog interactions, eye contact is a key element of relationship initiation and maintenance. Previous studies have suggested that canine ability to produce human-directed...

  5. Sociability and gazing toward humans in dogs and wolves: Simple behaviors with broad implications

    | Contributor(s):: Bentosela, M., Wynne, C. D., D'Orazio, M., Elgier, A., Udell, M. A.

  6. Structural variants in genes associated with human Williams-Beuren syndrome underlie stereotypical hypersociability in domestic dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Bridgett M. vonHoldt, Emily Shuldiner, Ilana Janowitz Koch, Rebecca Y. Kartzinel, Andrew Hogan, Lauren Brubaker, Shelby Wanser, Daniel Stahler, Clive D. L. Wynne, Elaine A. Ostrander, Janet S. Sinsheimer, Monique A. R. Udell

    Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the genetic basis of morphologic traits (for example, body size and coat color) in dogs and wolves, the genetic basis of their behavioral divergence is poorly understood. An integrative approach using both behavioral and genetic data...

  7. The Dog: A Domestic Wolf to Communicate with Man: The Aggressiveness of the Dog

    | Contributor(s):: Jean-Mane Giffroy

    On the basis of research in archeozoology and molecular genetics, it is established that the wolf is the main ancestor of the dog and that domestication would have occurred some 14,000 or 15,000 years ago, 5,000 years before the domestication of another species. The place or places of the first...

  8. The Wolf in the living room: A healing story: Julia Huffman at TEDxFargo

    | Contributor(s):: Julia Huffman

    Award winning filmmaker Julia Huffman (Medicine of the Wolf) takes us on a journey from her beginnings of being adopted and then the healing that took place with her first dog Bozo. This relationship with her canine, ultimatley led her to discovering the profound power of healing that both dogs...

  9. When dogs look back: inhibition of independent problem-solving behaviour in domestic dogs ( Canis lupus familiaris) compared with wolves ( Canis lupus)

    | Contributor(s):: Udell, M. A. R.

    Domestic dogs have been recognized for their social sensitivity and aptitude in human-guided tasks. For example, prior studies have demonstrated that dogs look to humans when confronted with an unsolvable task; an action often interpreted as soliciting necessary help. Conversely, wolves persist...

  10. From wolf to dog

    | Contributor(s):: Morell, V.

  11. From wolf to dog

    | Contributor(s):: Morell, V.

  12. Evolution. Dogs hijack the human bonding pathway

    | Contributor(s):: MacLean, E. L., Hare, B.

  13. Social evolution. Oxytocin-gaze positive loop and the coevolution of human-dog bonds

    | Contributor(s):: Nagasawa, M., Mitsui, S., En, S., Ohtani, N., Ohta, M., Sakuma, Y., Onaka, T., Mogi, K., Kikusui, T.

  14. Ethics and Wolf Management: Attitudes Toward and Tolerance of Wolves in Washington State

    | Contributor(s):: Julie Callahan

    Approximately seventy-five years after extirpation from Washington State, gray wolves (Canis lupus) returned. As of December 2012, eight packs had arrived from adjacent states and provinces. Delisted from the Federal Endangered Species List in the eastern one-third of Washington, state wildlife...

  15. Can humans discriminate between dogs on the base of the acoustic parameters of barks?

    | Contributor(s):: Molnar, C., Pongracz, P., Doka, A., Miklosi, A.

  16. A biometric re-evaluation of recent claims for early Upper Palaeolithic wolf domestication in Eurasia

    | Contributor(s):: Boudadi-Maligne, Myriam, Escarguel, Gilles

  17. Fossil dogs and wolves from Palaeolithic sties in Belgium, the Ukraine and Russia :osteometry, ancient DNA and stable isotopes

    | Contributor(s):: Germonpré, Mietje

  18. Size, shape and development in the evolution of the domestic dog

    | Contributor(s):: Morey, Darcy F.

  19. The advantages and disadvantages of being domesticated

    | Contributor(s):: Groves, Colin P.

  20. Two new dogs, and other Natufian dogs, from the southern Levant

    | Contributor(s):: Tchernov, Eitan