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  1. The use of quantitative risk assessment to assess lifetime welfare outcomes for breech strike and mulesing management options in Merino sheep

    Contributor(s):: Fisher, A. D., Giraudo, A., Martin, P. A. J., Paton, M. W.

  2. Assessment of unconsciousness during slaughter without stunning in lambs

    Contributor(s):: Rodriguez, P., Velarde, A., Dalmau, A., Llonch, P.

  3. Neonatal survival: contributions from behavioural studies in sheep

    Contributor(s):: Nowak, R.

    Newborn lambs need milk and immunological protection shortly after birth, and early interactions between the mother and the young are critical for this. Merino ewes in extensive conditions in Australia have the reputation of being a poor mothers. Attempts to improve the reproductive performance...

  4. A breeding goal to improve the welfare of sheep

    Contributor(s):: Scobie, D. R., Bray, A. R., O'Connell, D.

    This paper examines the practical and welfare implications of breeding a polled sheep with a short tail, devoid of wool on the head, legs, belly and breech, which has been proposed as a breeding goal (Scobie et al., Proceedings of the New Zealand Society of Animimal Production 57 (1997) 84-87)....

  5. A review of mulesing and other methods to control flystrike (cutaneous myiasis) in sheep

    Contributor(s):: Phillips, C. J. C.

    Flystrike (cutaneous myiasis) in sheep has the potential to have a major impact on the welfare of significant numbers of sheep worldwide, but particularly in Australia. The main control method used in Australia, the mulesing operation to remove folds of skin from the hindquarters of the sheep, is...

  6. Genotype rather than non-genetic behavioural transmission determines the temperament of Merino lambs

    Contributor(s):: Bickell, S., Poindron, P., Nowak, R., Chadwick, A., Ferguson, D., Blache, D.

    Merino ewes have been selected, over 18 generations, for calm (C) or nervous (N) temperament using an arena test and an isolation box test. We investigated the relative contributions of genotype versus the post-partum behaviour of the dam on the temperament of the lambs using a cross-fostering...

  7. Selection for easier managed sheep

    Contributor(s):: Conington, J., Collins, J., Dwyer, C.

    Current alterations in the farm environment, such as a reduced number of farm workers, may mean that sheep genotypes that are highly dependent on man for nutritional and reproductive success will experience poorer welfare within that environment. In the past 30 years, average flock size has...