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Tags: Zoonoses + Humans

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  1. Animal-assisted interventions: A national survey of health and safety policies in hospitals, eldercare facilities, and therapy animal organizations

    Contributor(s):: Linder, D. E., Gibbs, D. M., Siebens, H. C., Mueller, M. K., Freeman, L. M.

  2. Practices and Perceptions of Animal Contact and Associated Health Outcomes in Pregnant Women and New Mothers

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hsin-Yi Weng, Kimberly Ankrom

    Companion animals play an important role in our society. However, pregnant women and new mothers might have specific concerns about animal-associated health outcomes because of their altered immune function and posture as well as their newborn babies. The study was conducted to collect baseline...

  3. Current opinion on maximizing veterinary profession growth and contributions

    | Contributor(s):: Nimmanapalli, R., Donapaty, S. R.

    Veterinary profession sphere overlaps three major biology arenas namely agriculture, basic sciences, and human medicine. Thus, so far the investments in veterinary field are not proportional to the scope of their responsibilities. Rededication and rejuvenation can help veterinary profession to...

  4. The impact of animals on patient wellbeing

    | Contributor(s):: Williams, B.

  5. Benefits and Risks for People and Livestock of Keeping Companion Animals: Searching for a Healthy Balance

    | Contributor(s):: Sterneberg-van der Maaten, T., Turner, D., Van Tilburg, J., Vaarten, J.

  6. Disease Risk Assessments Involving Companion Animals: an Overview for 15 Selected Pathogens Taking a European Perspective

    | Contributor(s):: Rijks, J. M., Cito, F., Cunningham, A. A., Rantsios, A. T., Giovannini, A.

  7. Incorporating one health into medical education

    | Contributor(s):: Rabinowitz, P. M., Natterson-Horowitz, B. J., Kahn, L. H., Kock, R., Pappaioanou, M.

  8. On the role of pets in GermanyZur Rolle von Kleintieren in Deutschland

    | Contributor(s):: Schwarz, S.

    This article discusses the number and presence of pets in the German household, especially dogs and cats; essentiality and importance of pets to the well-being of German owners; ability of pets to decrease the risk of heart disease; and function of dogs in rescue, animal assisted therapy and...

  9. Animals in healthcare facilities: recommendations to minimize potential risks

    | Contributor(s):: Murthy, R., Bearman, G., Brown, S., Bryant, K., Chinn, R., Hewlett, A., George, B. G., Goldstein, E. J., Holzmann-Pazgal, G., Rupp, M. E., Wiemken, T., Weese, J. S., Weber, D. J.

  10. Zoonotic poxviruses associated with companion animals

    | Contributor(s):: Tack, D. M., Reynolds, M. G.

    Understanding the zoonotic risk posed by poxviruses in companion animals is important for protecting both human and animal health. The outbreak of monkeypox in the United States, as well as current reports of cowpox in Europe, point to the fact that companion animals are increasingly serving as...

  11. Do animals help people in hospitals? [News]

    | Contributor(s):: Jackson, A.

  12. Quantitative assessment of human and pet exposure to Salmonella associated with dry pet foods

    | Contributor(s):: Lambertini, E., Buchanan, R. L., Narrod, C., Ford, R. M., Baker, R. C., Pradhan, A. K.

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet foods and treats highlight the importance of these foods as previously overlooked exposure vehicles for both pets and humans. In the last decade efforts have been made to raise the safety of this class of products, for instance by upgrading...

  13. Public Health Implications of Animals in Retail Food Outlets

    | Contributor(s):: Dyjack, David T. DrPH C. I. H., Ho, Jessica R. D., Lynes, Rachel M. P. H., Bliss, Jesse C. M. P. H.

  14. Animals in Healthcare Facilities: Recommendations to Minimize Potential Risks

    | Contributor(s):: Murthy, Rekha, Bearman, Gonzalo, Brown, Sherrill, Bryant, Kristina, Chinn, Raymond, Hewlett, Angela, George, B. Glenn, Goldstein, Ellie J. C., Holzmann-Pazgal, Galit, Rupp, Mark E., Wiemken, Timothy, Weese, J. Scott, Weber, David J.

  15. Best practices for planning events encouraging human-animal interactions

    | Contributor(s):: Erdozain, G., Kukanich, K., Chapman, B., Powell, D.

    Educational events encouraging human-animal interaction include the risk of zoonotic disease transmission. It is estimated that 14% of all disease in the USA caused by Campylobacter spp., Cryptosporidium spp., Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157, non-O157 STECs, Listeria...

  16. Enteric pathogens of dogs and cats with public health implications

    | Contributor(s):: Kantere, M., Athanasiou, L. V., Chatzopoulos, D. C., Spyrou, V., Valiakos, G., Kontos, V., Billinis, C.

    Dogs and cats play an important role in modern society, enhancing the psychological and physiological well-being of many people. However, there are well-documented health risks associated with human animal interactions. More specifically, enteric pathogens of zoonotic risk which are transmitted...

  17. Zoonotic disease risks for immunocompromised and other high-risk clients and staff: promoting safe pet ownership and contact

    | Contributor(s):: Stull, J. W., Stevenson, K. B.

    Pets can be a source of disease (zoonoses) for humans. The disease risks associated with pet contact are highest among young children, the elderly, pregnant women, and immunocompromised hosts. These individuals and household members display limited knowledge of pet-associated disease, rarely...

  18. Zoonotic disease risks for immunocompromised and other high-risk clients and staff: promoting safe pet ownership and contact

    | Contributor(s):: Stull, J. W., Stevenson, K. B.

    Pets can be a source of disease (zoonoses) for humans. The disease risks associated with pet contact are highest among young children, the elderly, pregnant women, and immunocompromised hosts. These individuals and household members display limited knowledge of pet-associated disease, rarely...

  19. Around cats

    | Contributor(s):: Goldstein, E. J. C., Greene, C. E., Schlossberg, D.

    This chapter focuses on diseases transmitted from cats to humans. The diseases transmitted by inhalation (bordetellosis, plague and Q fever), vectors (ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, cat scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, flea-borne spotted fever, murine typhus and leishmaniasis), faecal-oral...

  20. Less common house pets

    | Contributor(s):: Chomel, B. B., Schlossberg, D.

    This chapter focuses on the major health threats associated with exposure of humans to less common house pets. The viral, bacterial, parasitic and mycotic zoonoses transmitted by pet rabbits, rodents, reptiles, amphibians, ornamental aquarium fish, ferrets, bats and nonhuman primates are...