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  1. One health: the importance of companion animal vector-borne diseases

    | Contributor(s):: Michael J Day

    The international prominence accorded the 'One Health' concept of co-ordinated activity of those involved in human and animal health is a modern incarnation of a long tradition of comparative medicine, with roots in the ancient civilizations and a golden era during the 19th century...

  2. Pets, Purity and Pollution: Why Conventional Models of Disease Transmission Do Not Work for Pet Rat Owners

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Charlotte Robin, Elizabeth Perkins, Francine Watkins, Robert Christley

    In the United Kingdom, following the emergence of Seoul hantavirus in pet rat owners in 2012, public health authorities tried to communicate the risk of this zoonotic disease, but had limited success. To explore this lack of engagement with health advice, we conducted in-depth, semi-structured...

  3. Hepatitis E Virus Serosurvey among Pet Dogs and Cats in Several Developed Cities in China

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Huanbin Liang, Jidang Chen, Jiexiong Xie, Long Sun, Fanxiao Ji, Shuyi He, Yun Zheng, Chumin Liang, Guihong Zhang, Shuo Su, Shoujun Li

    Infection by Hepatitis E virus (HEV), as a zoonotic disease virus, is well studied in pigs in China, but few studies in pets have been performed. This study was designed to characterize the prevalence of HEV infection among pet dogs and cats in major metropolitan areas of China. We conducted a...

  4. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Campylobacter spp. Prevalence and Concentration in Household Pets and Petting Zoo Animals for Use in Exposure Assessments

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Katarina D. M. Pintar, Tanya Christidis, M. Kate Thomas, Maureen Anderson, Andrea Nesbitt, Jessica Keithlin, Barbara Marshall, Frank Pollari

    Animal contact is a potential transmission route for campylobacteriosis, and both domestic household pet and petting zoo exposures have been identified as potential sources of exposure. Research has typically focussed on the prevalence, concentration, and transmission of zoonoses from farm...

  5. The zoonotic potential of Clostridium difficile from small companion animals and their owners

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Rabold D, Espelage W, Abu Sin M, Eckmanns T, Schneeberg A, Neubauer H, et al.

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in humans range from asymptomatic carriage to life-threatening intestinal disease. Findings on C. difficile in various animal species and an overlap in ribotypes (RTs) suggest potential zoonotic transmission. However, the impact of...

  6. Practices and Perceptions of Animal Contact and Associated Health Outcomes in Pregnant Women and New Mothers

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hsin-Yi Weng, Kimberly Ankrom

    Companion animals play an important role in our society. However, pregnant women and new mothers might have specific concerns about animal-associated health outcomes because of their altered immune function and posture as well as their newborn babies. The study was conducted to collect baseline...

  7. Editorial: Towards Elimination of Dog Mediated Human Rabies

    | Contributor(s):: Salome Dürr, Anna S. Fahrion, Lea Knopf, Louise H. Taylor

    Rabies is a zoonotic viral disease with a high impact on human and animal health. The disease is almost 100% fatal after clinical signs appear and kills tens of thousands of people per year worldwide. About 99% of infections in humans are caused by rabid domestic dog bites. Human disease is...

  8. Elimination of Dog-Mediated Human Rabies Deaths by 2030: Needs Assessment and Alternatives for Progress Based on Dog Vaccination

    | Contributor(s):: Ryan M. Wallace, Eduardo A. Undurraga, Jesse D. Blanton, Julie Cleaton, Richard Franka

    Background: Rabies imposes a substantial burden to about half of the world population. The World Health Organization (WHO), World Organization for Animal Health, and the Food and Agriculture Organization have set the goal of eliminating dog-mediated human rabies deaths by 2030. This could be...

  9. Company human-animal interaction in the municipality of Paragominas, southeast of ParaInteracao homem-animal de companhia no municipio de Paragominas, sudeste do Para

    | Contributor(s):: Santos, R. C. B., Moura, K. B., Sousa e Sousa, E., Oliveira, R. A. de, Soares, B. C., Melo, W. de O.

    Objective of this study was to characterize the creation of companion animals raised in the southeastern region of Para. The study was conducted in the municipality of Paragominas-PA, from June to July 2015. The method used in data collection was the survey with questionnaires containing open and...

  10. The impact of animals on patient wellbeing

    | Contributor(s):: Williams, B.

  11. Benefits and Risks for People and Livestock of Keeping Companion Animals: Searching for a Healthy Balance

    | Contributor(s):: Sterneberg-van der Maaten, T., Turner, D., Van Tilburg, J., Vaarten, J.

  12. Disease Risk Assessments Involving Companion Animals: an Overview for 15 Selected Pathogens Taking a European Perspective

    | Contributor(s):: Rijks, J. M., Cito, F., Cunningham, A. A., Rantsios, A. T., Giovannini, A.

  13. Caracterização dos comportamentos de tutores de animais de estimação numa amostra não probabilística

    | Contributor(s):: Zélia Irina Lucas Rebelo

    O presente estudo tem como objectivo caracterizar o comportamento dos tutores de animais utilizando uma amostra não-probabilística. Neste contexto, foi elaborado um questionário online conduzido entre Março de 2014 e Julho de 2014, que consiste em 31 questões...

  14. The Control of Notifiable Zoonotic Diseases in Pet Animals in Sweden

    | Contributor(s):: Cathrine Ericson

    Zoonotic diseases are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans. There are multiple ways for humans to acquire a zoonotic disease. Zoonoses can spread either from direct contact with a carrier or sick animal, ingestion of contaminated feedstuff or have an indirect or environmental...

  15. Risk behaviors for disease transmission among petting zoo attendees

    | Contributor(s):: M. McMillian, J.R. Dunn, J.E. Keen, K.L. Brady, T.F. Jones

    To evaluate risk behaviors for transmission of zoonotic diseases at petting zoos during a period without a recognized disease outbreak. Observational survey with environmental microbiologic sampling. 6 petting zoos in Tennessee. Attendees were observed for animal and environmental contact, eating...

  16. Observation of public health risk behaviors, risk communication and hand hygiene at Kansas and Missouri petting zoos – 2010-2011

    | Contributor(s):: Gonzalo Erdozain, Katherine KuKanich, Benjamin Chapman, Douglas A. Powell

    Outbreaks of human illness have been linked to visiting settings with animal contact throughout developed countries. This paper details an observational study of hand hygiene tool availability and recommendations; frequency of risky behavior; and, handwashing attempts by visitors in Kansas (9)...

  17. Zoonosis in the Nursing Home

    | Contributor(s):: Schattner, Ami, Huber, Robert

  18. Prevalence Of, Risk Factors For, And Zoonotic Potential Of Giardia Spp. Infection In Cats Housed In An Animal Shelter

    | Contributor(s):: Stephanie Janeczko

    Giardia duodenalis is an intestinal protozoal parasite capable of causing both clinical and subclinical disease in a broad range of species, including humans and cats. The parasite has a ubiquitous distribution and infection occurs worldwide in nearly all mammals. Giardia infection in cats may...

  19. On the role of pets in GermanyZur Rolle von Kleintieren in Deutschland

    | Contributor(s):: Schwarz, S.

    This article discusses the number and presence of pets in the German household, especially dogs and cats; essentiality and importance of pets to the well-being of German owners; ability of pets to decrease the risk of heart disease; and function of dogs in rescue, animal assisted therapy and...

  20. Animals in healthcare facilities: recommendations to minimize potential risks

    | Contributor(s):: Murthy, R., Bearman, G., Brown, S., Bryant, K., Chinn, R., Hewlett, A., George, B. G., Goldstein, E. J., Holzmann-Pazgal, G., Rupp, M. E., Wiemken, T., Weese, J. S., Weber, D. J.