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  1. Attachment style classification in the interspecific and intraspecific bond in dogs

    Contributor(s):: Borrelli, C., Riggio, G., Gazzano, A., Carlone, B., Mariti, C.

  2. Encoding of Arousal and Physical Characteristics in Audible and Ultrasonic Vocalizations of Mongolian Gerbil Pups Testing Common Rules for Mammals

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Silberstein, Yara, Felmy, Felix, Scheumann, Marina

    In mammals, common rules for the encoding of arousal and physical characteristics of the sender are suggested based on a similar vocal production apparatus. In this study, we want to investigate to what extent vocalizations of developing Mongolian gerbil pups fulfill these rules. We recorded...

  3. Reducing barking in a Brazilian animal shelter: A practical intervention

    | Contributor(s):: Baldan, Ana Lucia, Ferreira, Bruna Lima, Warisaia, Vinicius, Feuerbacher, Erica Nan, Monticelli, Patrícia Ferreira, Gunter, Lisa Marie

  4. Ultrasonic vocalizations near 30 kHz may indicate excitement rather than distress in female Wistar rats

    | Contributor(s):: Lupfer, Gwen, Brandenburger, Alex, Machado, Mychal

    Rats emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), sometimes referred to as 50-kHz vocalizations, during activities such as play and lower-frequency USVs, sometimes referred to as 22-kHz vocalizations, when experiencing distress. Definitions of 22-kHz vocalizations vary in terms of which frequencies...

  5. Scaredy-cat: Assessment of individual differences in response to an acute everyday stressor across development in the domestic cat

    | Contributor(s):: Urrutia, Andrea, Bánszegi, Oxána, Szenczi, Péter, Hudson, Robyn

  6. The Effects of the Human Voice on the Behavioral Indicators of Stress in Dogs Housed in an Animal Shelter

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Juliana M. Hypes

    Animal shelters are very stressful environments for the animals housed there. Dogs that live in shelters have been observed exhibiting stress-related behavior such as barking, pacing, aggression and fear related behaviors such as cowering. Behaviors of this nature are off-putting to prospective...

  7. Evidence of Pain, Stress, and Fear of Humans During Tail Docking and the Next Four Weeks in Piglets (Sus scrofa domesticus)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Céline Tallet, Marine Rakotomahandry, Sabine Herlemont, Armelle Prunier

    Tail docking is widely performed in pig farms to prevent tail biting. We investigated the consequences of this practice on behavioral indicators of pain and stress, and on the human-piglet relationship during lactation.Within 19 litters, piglets (1–3 days of age) were submitted on day 0...

  8. Human Ability to Determine Affective States in Domestic Horse Whinnies

    | Contributor(s):: Merkies, Katrina, Crouchman, Elizabeth, Belliveau, Haley

    Horses use whinnies as a communication tool that potentially indicates positive or negative situations reflective of their felt experience. Being able to interpret the emotional state of horses allows humans to respond appropriately to mitigate a negative situation or repeat or enhance a positive...

  9. Selection for reduced fear of humans changes intra-specific social behavior in red junglefowl - implications for chicken domestication

    | Contributor(s):: Gjoen, J., Jensen, P.

  10. An exploratory study on dogs' vocalizations towards their owner and food in an unsolvable task

    | Contributor(s):: Gaunet, Florence, Savalli, Carine, Legou, Thierry

    Despite ongoing research, many aspects of dogs’ vocal communication are not yet fully understood, including how they convey information about items. The aim of the present exploratory study was to determine whether dogs vocalize differently toward their owner and food in an unsolvable...

  11. A Case Study: Observations of Behaviors & Vocalizations in a Captive Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus) During Quarantine

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Alexandra Dilley

    Bozie, an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus), was relocated from the Baton Rouge Zoo to Smithsonian’s National Zoo. During a requisite 29-day quarantine period, I recorded Bozie’s stress-related behaviors and the vocalizations she produced when she was alone and with her keepers in...

  12. Only When It Feels Good: Specific Cat Vocalizations Other Than Meowing

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jaciana Luzia Fermo, Maria Alice Schnaider, Adelaide Hercília Pescatori Silva, Carla Forte Maiolino Molento

    Our objective was to identify and characterize the types of vocalization other than meowing (VOM) in two contexts, a pleasant and an aversive situation, and to study the effect of the sex of the animal. A total of 74 cats (32 tom cats and 42 queens) living in the city of Curitiba, Brazil,...

  13. Digital Dogsitter® reduces vocalization in dogs suffering from separation-related problems

    | Contributor(s):: Tiira, Katriina

  14. Pet dogs home alone: A video-based study

    | Contributor(s):: Stephan, Gerrit, Leidhold, Joachim, Hammerschmidt, Kurt

  15. Do You Hear What I Hear? Human Perception of Coyote Group Size

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kyle Brewster, Scott E. Henke, Alfonso Ortega, John Tomecek, Benjamin Turner

    Recordings of 1 – 4 coyotes (Canis latrans) that were howling and yip-yapping were played to 427 participants who were asked to estimate the number of coyotes they perceived to hear. Participants were separated by gender (M or F), age group ( 35), resident location (urban, suburban, or...

  16. Acoustic variables of high-pitched vocalizations in dairy sheep breeds

    | Contributor(s):: Papadaki, Kallirroi, Laliotis, George P., Bizelis, Iosif

    The source–filter theory of voice production is widely used on mammal vocal communication research allowing a better understanding of individual and context variations. Generally, mammals with less complex repertoires have received little attention regarding the influence of different...

  17. Humans can identify cats' affective states from subtle facial expressions

    | Contributor(s):: Dawson, L. C., Cheal, J., Niel, L., Mason, G.

  18. Anticipatory behaviour in animals: A critical review

    | Contributor(s):: Anderson, C., von Keyserlingk, M. A. G., Lidfors, L. M., Weary, D. M.

  19. Automatic Classification of Cat Vocalizations Emitted in Different Contexts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Stavros Ntalampiras, Luca Andrea Ludovico, Giorgio Presti, Emanuela Prato Previde, Monica Battini, Simona Cannas, Clara Palestrini, Silvana Mattiello

    Cats employ vocalizations for communicating information, thus their sounds can carry a wide range of meanings. Concerning vocalization, an aspect of increasing relevance directly connected with the welfare of such animals is its emotional interpretation and the recognition of the production...

  20. Identification of specific call types produced by pre-weaning gilts in response to isolation

    | Contributor(s):: Olson, Mariah J., Creamer, Maggie, Horback, Kristina M.