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  1. Canine Endogenous Oxytocin Responses to Dog-Walking and Affiliative Human–Dog Interactions

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lauren Powell, Kate M. Edwards, Adrian Bauman, Adam J. Guastella, Bradley Drayton, Emmanuel Stamatakis, Paul McGreevy

    Several studies suggest human–dog interactions elicit a positive effect on canine oxytocin concentrations. However, empirical investigations are scant and the joint influence of human–dog interaction and physical activity remains unexplored. The aims of the current study were to (a)...

  2. The Translation of Movement From the Equine to Rider With Relevance for Hippotherapy

    | Contributor(s):: Donaldson, M. C., Holter, A. M., Neuhoff, S., Arnosky, J. A., Simpson, B. W., Vernon, K., Blob, R. W., DesJardins, J. D.

  3. Immediate effect of horse riding simulator on adductor spasticity in children with cerebral palsy: A randomized controlled trial

    | Contributor(s):: Hemachithra, C., Meena, N., Ramanathan, R., Felix, A. J. W.

  4. Understanding how dogs encourage and motivate walking: cross-sectional findings from RESIDE

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Carri Westgarth, M. Knuiman, H. E. Christian

    Background: Many people live with dogs but not all walk with them regularly. This study examines the demographic and behavioural factors that contribute towards owners reporting having a strong sense of encouragement and motivation to walk provided by their dogs, which we call ‘the Lassie...

  5. Dog owners are more likely to meet physical activity guidelines than people without a dog: An investigation of the association between dog ownership and physical activity levels in a UK community

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Carri Westgarth, Robert M. Christley, Christopher Jewell, Alexander J.German, Lynne M. Boddy, Hayley E. Christian

    Previous research suggests that dog owners are slightly more physically active than those without dogs, but have only studied one household member, and it is unclear whether time spent dog walking replaces other physical activity (PA). A survey of 191 dog owning adults (DO), 455 non-dog owning...

  6. Impacts of Encouraging Dog Walking on Returns of Newly Adopted Dogs to a Shelter

    | Contributor(s):: Gunter, Lisa, Protopopova, Alexandra, Hooker, Steven P., Ananian, Cheryl Der, Wynne, Clive D. L.

    This study involved examining the ability of a postadoption intervention to reduce returns of newly adopted dogs to shelters by encouraging physical activity between adopters and their dogs. Guardians in the intervention group received emails with dog behavior and human activity advice as well as...

  7. Electronic detection of lameness in dairy cows through measuring pedometric activity and lying behavior

    | Contributor(s):: Alsaaod, Maher, Römer, Christoph, Kleinmanns, Jens, Hendriksen, Kathrin, Rose-Meierhöfer, Sandra, Plümer, Lutz, Büscher, Wolfgang

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the efficiency of electronic measurement of activity and lying behavior by ALT-pedometer to recognize different behavior patterns between non-lame and lame cows. The sensors were used to measure the activity and lying behavior, including the total...

  8. Dog walking among adolescents: Correlates and contribution to physical activity.

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jessa K. Engelberg, Jordan A. Carlson, Terry L. Conway, Kelli L. Cain, Brian E. Saelens

    PURPOSE: To assess the association of dog walking with adolescents' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and body mass index (BMI), and identify correlates of dog walking. METHODS/DESIGN: Participants were 12-17year-olds (n=925) from the Baltimore, MD and Seattle, WA regions....

  9. Pet dogs exhibit social preference for people who synchronize with them: what does it tell us about the evolution of behavioral synchronization?

    | Contributor(s):: Duranton, C., Bedossa, T., Gaunet, F.

  10. Use of behavioural and physiological responses for scoring sound sensitivity in dogs

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Carla Caroline Franzini de Souza, Daniel Penteado Martins Dias, Raquel Nascimento de Souza, Magda Alves de Medeiros

    Sound sensitive dogs have exaggerated responses to sound stimuli that can negatively impact the welfare of the dog. Behavioural reactions combined with the response to sound involve a marked autonomic imbalance towards sympathetic predominance and release of cortisol. The purpose of the present...

  11. To a Future Where Everyone Can Walk a Dog Even if They Don't Own One

    | Contributor(s):: Chen, E. Y.

    2018Front Public Health63492296-2565 (Print)2296-256510.3389/fpubh.2018.00349engDepartment of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States.text

  12. The influence of dog ownership on objective measures of free-living physical activity and sedentary behaviour in community-dwelling older adults: a longitudinal case-controlled study

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Philippa Margaret Dall, Sarah Lesley Helen Ellis, Brian Martin Ellis, P Margaret Grant, Alison Colyer, Nancy Renee Gee, Malcolm Howard Granat, Daniel Simon Mills

    Background There is some evidence to suggest that dog ownership may improve physical activity (PA) among older adults, but to date, studies examining this, have either depended on self-report or incomplete datasets due to the type of activity monitor used to record physical activity....

  13. I Walk My Dog Because It Makes Me Happy: A Qualitative Study to Understand Why Dogs Motivate Walking and Improved Health

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Carri Westgarth, Robert M. Christley, Garry Marvin, Elizabeth Perkins

    Dog walking is a popular everyday physical activity. Dog owners are generally more active than non-owners, but some rarely walk with their dog. The strength of the dog–owner relationship is known to be correlated with dog walking, and this qualitative study investigates why. Twenty-six...

  14. Arrival Stories: Using Participatory, Embodied, Sensory Ethnography to Explore the Making of an English City for Newly Arrived International Students

    | Contributor(s):: Stevenson, Andrew

  15. Controversies Regarding Service Animals in the Ambulatory Oncology Setting

    | Contributor(s):: Meyer, F. L., McCrory, N., Hewitt, L.

  16. (Just) a walk with the dog? Animal geographies and negotiating walking spaces

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Thomas Fletcher, Louise Platt

    In this paper we present findings from interviews conducted with people who walk with dogs. Drawing on new walking studies and animal geographies as our theoretical framework, we adopt the view that walking is more than just walking; it is often a highly sensual and complex activity. We argue...

  17. Eunice Chen

    https://habricentral.org/members/4036

  18. A Birth Cohort Analysis to Study Dog Walking in Adolescence Shows No Relationship with Objectively Measured Physical Activity

    | Contributor(s):: Carri Westgarth, Andrew R. Ness, Calum Mattocks, Robert M. Christley

    Physical inactivity during childhood and adolescence is a serious health concern. There are few studies of the activity undertaken by adolescents when walking with the family dog, and the effect of this on objectively measured physical activity levels. Objective measures of physical activity...

  19. Feasibility of a volunteer dog-walking program for high school students and shelter dogs in Chico, California

    | Contributor(s):: Danielle Allred

    Dog-walking is gaining recognition as a way of combating sedentary lifestyles. Dog owners who walk their dogs are more likely to meet physical activity standards recommended by the Center for Disease Control, and studies have shown positive benefits resulting from animal interaction, including...

  20. Older Adults May Benefit from Bonds Formed With Dogs