You are here: Home / Tags / weasels / All Categories

Tags: weasels

All Categories (1-20 of 30)

  1. Social behaviour of endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola) litters in captivity

    Contributor(s):: Kiik, Kairi, Maran, Tiit, Kneidinger, Nadja, Tammaru, Toomas

    In litter-bearing mammals, the environment and social interactions during early life often have a substantial effect on future behaviour of the animal. Most information though derives from lab rodents, pets or farm animals while comparable data are scarce for non-domesticated species, and...

  2. Environmentally enriching American mink ( Neovison vison) increases lymphoid organ weight and skeletal symmetry, and reveals differences between two sub-types of stereotypic behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Diez-Leon, M., Bursian, S., Galicia, D., Napolitano, A., Palme, R., Mason, G.

    Enrichment studies for wild carnivores (e.g., in zoos) are often short-term, use enrichments of unknown motivational significance, and focus on glucocorticoids and stereotypic behaviour (SB), ignoring other stress-relevant variables. Our study assessed the broad behavioural and physiological...

  3. Workaholic ferrets: does a two-chamber consumer demand study give insight in the preferences of laboratory ferrets ( Mustela putorius furo)?

    Contributor(s):: Reijgwart, M. L., Vinke, C. M., Hendriksen, C. F. M., Meer, M. van der, Schoemaker, N. J., Zeeland, Y. R. A. van

    Although provision of environmental enrichment is an effective tool to refine laboratory animal experiments, it is currently unknown which enrichments ferrets prefer. This study aimed to assess the suitability of a closed economy, two-chamber consumer demand set-up to determine ferrets'...

  4. The avoidance of farmyards by European badgers Meles meles in a medium density population

    Contributor(s):: Mullen, E. M., MacWhite, T., Maher, P. K., Kelly, D. J., Marples, N. M., Good, M.

    Mycobacterium bovis (TB) in cattle is a disease with far-reaching economic effects throughout Europe but especially in Great Britain and Ireland. Wildlife reservoirs, in particular the European badger Meles meles, continue to play an important role in the transmission of the disease, although the...

  5. Cumulative experience, age-class, sex and season affect the behavioural responses of European badgers ( Meles meles) to handling and sedation

    Contributor(s):: Sun, Q., Stevens, C., Newman, C., Buesching, C. D., Macdonald, D. W.

    The restraint and sedation of wild animals has welfare implications, thus animal handling procedures should be well-informed and optimised to adhere to welfare standards. Furthermore, it is important that handling procedures should not cause future trap avoidance. This is of particular pertinence...

  6. Early transfer of mated females into the maternity unit reduces stress and increases maternal care in farm mink

    Contributor(s):: Malmkvist, J., Palme, R.

    Mated mammals on farms are typically transferred to another housing environment prior to delivery. We investigated whether the timing of this transfer - EARLY (Day -36), INTERMEDIATE (Day -18), or LATE (Day -3) relative to the expected day of birth (Day 0) - affects maternal stress, maternal care...

  7. The reliability of welfare assessment according to the WelFur-protocol in the nursing period of mink (Neovison vison) is challenged by increasing welfare problems prior to weaning

    Contributor(s):: Henriksen, B. I. F., Moller, S. H.

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the body condition of the mink dam, the frequency of dirty nests, frequency of injuries and diarrhoea change significantly with the day of assessment, post-partum, within the data collection period from parturition to weaning,...

  8. Are you treating all creatures great and small?

    Contributor(s):: Cope, I.

    The exotic pet turning up in the waiting room of the local practice is a growing trend. Their owners expect veterinarians to be able to see and triage most species, but is this a fair expectation? Should vets be able to see and treat all creatures great and small or are those days of James...

  9. Less common house pets

    Contributor(s):: Chomel, B. B., Schlossberg, D.

    This chapter focuses on the major health threats associated with exposure of humans to less common house pets. The viral, bacterial, parasitic and mycotic zoonoses transmitted by pet rabbits, rodents, reptiles, amphibians, ornamental aquarium fish, ferrets, bats and nonhuman primates are...

  10. A survey of abnormal repetitive behaviors in North American river otters housed in zoos

    Contributor(s):: Morabito, P., Bashaw, M. J.

    Stereotypic behaviors, indicating poor welfare and studied in a variety of species (especially carnivores), appear related to characteristics of current and past environments. Although North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) often develop abnormal, repetitive, possibly stereotypic...

  11. Insurance for household animals and its application to enlightening of preventive veterinary medicine - how insurance can support the human-animal bond?

    Contributor(s):: Kawarai, A.

    Anicom has acquired the license of operating "Animal health insurance" from the Financial Services Agency and has now been issued the insurance policies to more than 430 thousands animals (89% dogs, 10% cats, and 1% birds/rabbits/ferrets) as at December, 2012. When animals are registered to...

  12. Welfare of non-traditional pets

    Contributor(s):: Schuppli, C. A., Fraser, D., Bacon, H. J.

    The keeping of non-traditional or 'exotic' pets has been growing in popularity worldwide. In addition to the typical welfare challenges of keeping more traditional pet species like dogs and cats, ensuring the welfare of non-traditional pets is complicated by factors such as lack of knowledge,...

  13. Pet travel changes - good for owners... but what about pets?

    Contributor(s):: Cooper, E.

  14. Providing 'get-away bunks' and other enrichments to primiparous adult female mink improves their reproductive productivity

    Contributor(s):: Buob, M., Meagher, R., Dawson, L., Palme, R., Haley, D., Mason, G.

  15. Providing elevated 'getaway bunks' to nursing mink dams improves their health and welfare

    Contributor(s):: Dawson, L., Buob, M., Haley, D., Miller, S., Stryker, J., Quinton, M., Mason, G.

  16. The development of on-farm welfare assessment protocols for foxes and mink: the WelFur project

    Contributor(s):: Mononen, J., Moller, S. H., Hansen, S. W., Hovland, A. L., Koistinen, T., Lidfors, L., Malmkvist, J., Vinke, C. M., Ahola, L.

  17. Latitudinal variation in diet and patterns of human interaction in the marine otter

    Contributor(s):: Mangel, J. C., Whitty, T., Medina-Vogel, G., Alfaro-Shigueto, J., Caceres, C., Godley, B. J.

    The marine otter (Lontra felina) inhabits patches of rocky coastline from central Peru to southern Chile and is classified as Endangered by the IUCN. Given the limited information available about the species, we set out to assess marine otter diet with a view to detecting latitudinal differences,...

  18. Behaviour of badgers ( Meles meles ) in farm buildings: opportunities for the transmission of Mycobacterium bovis to cattle?

    Contributor(s):: Tolhurst, B. A., Delahay, R. J., Walker, N. J., Ward, A. I., Roper, T. J.

    Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) are implicated in the transmission of bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) to cattle. Here we investigate potential spatio-temporal foci of opportunities for contact between badgers and cattle in farm buildings. We discuss the relative occurrence of different...

  19. Deterrent or dinner bell? Alteration of badger activity and feeding at baited plots using ultrasonic and water jet devices

    Contributor(s):: Ward, A. I., Pietravalle, S., Cowan, D. P., Delahay, R. J.

    The increasing incidence of reports of damage caused by Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) in UK urban environments requires the development of effective, humane, non-lethal solutions. Ultrasonic deterrents are widely available to the public and are sold as a humane solution to the presence of...

  20. Do the stereotypies of pigs, chickens and mink reflect adaptive species differences in the control of foraging?

    Contributor(s):: Mason, G., Mendl, M.

    Species differences in food-related stereotypies and natural foraging behaviour are discussed, and evolutionary explanations for these species differences, and reasons why apparent species differences in stereotypy may be artefacts of husbandry are postulated.