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  1. A One Health message about bats increases intentions to follow public health guidance on bat rabies

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hang Lu, Katherine A. McComas, Danielle E. Buttke, Sungjong Roh, Margaret A. Wild

    Since 1960, bat rabies variants have become the greatest source of human rabies deaths in the United States. Improving rabies awareness and preventing human exposure to rabid bats remains a national public health priority today. Concurrently, conservation of bats and the ecosystem benefits they...

  2. Impact of Wind Energy on Bats: a Summary of our Current Knowledge

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Cris D. Hein, Michael R. Schirmacher

    Since 2003, when it was discovered that large numbers of bats were being killed at wind turbines in the eastern United States, our understanding of the impact of wind energy development on bats has increased and consistent patterns of fatality, including seasonality and species composition have...

  3. The Ethics of Human–Animal Relationships and Public Discourse: A Case Study of Lions Bred for Their Bones

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Peter Coals, Dawn Burnham, Andrew Loveridge, David W. Macdonald, Michael ’t Sas-Rolfes, Vivienne L. Williams, John A. Vucetich

    Conservation and natural resource management are increasingly attending the ethical elements of public decisions. Ethical considerations are challenging, in part, because they typically require accounting for the moral consideration of various human and nonhuman forms of life, whose interests...

  4. Evaluating Wildlife–Vehicle Collision Hotspots Using Kernel-Based Estimation: a Focus on the Endangered Asiatic Cheetah in Central Iran

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Alireza Mohammadi, Mohammad Kaboli

    The transportation networks within and adjacent to protected areas degrade natural habitats and contribute to a higher risk of mortality through roadkill. Following years of unplanned and unsustainable road network development in Iran, the protected areas of significant biodiversity value have...

  5. Comparing Social Media Observations of Animals During a Solar Eclipse to Published Research

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Robert Ritson, Dustin H. Ranglack, Nate Bickford

    A wide variety of environmental stimuli can influence the behavior of animals including temperature, weather, light, lunar and seasonal cycles, seismic activity, as well as other perturbations to their circadian rhythm. Solar eclipses offer a unique opportunity to evaluate the relative...

  6. Integrated Stress and Community Perceptions: Toward an Understanding of Human-Cougar Tolerance

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lara Brenner

    Evidence suggests that cougars (Puma concolor) are beginning to recolonize their traditional range in the Midwestern and Eastern US, returning to a landscape and a social environment that have changed drastically in a century of absence. Any hope of the cougar’s persistence depends on...

  7. Ecology of Conflict: Marine Food Supply Affects Human-Wildlife Interactions on Land

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kyle A. Artelle, Sean C. Anderson, John D. Reynolds, Andrew B. Cooper, Paul C. Paquet, Chris T. Darimont

    Human-wildlife conflicts impose considerable costs to people and wildlife worldwide. Most research focuses on proximate causes, offering limited generalizable understanding of ultimate drivers. We tested three competing hypotheses (problem individuals, regional population saturation, limited...

  8. Human-Bear Interactions Among Black Bears in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, and Polar Bears on Alaska's North Slope

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Wesley G. Larson

    Human-bear interactions are an important consideration of bear biology, as interactions can lead to destruction of property as well as injury or death for both human and bear. Successful analysis of why these interactions occur can lead to appropriate preventative measures and mitigation of...

  9. Compassionate Conservation: Exploring the Lives of African Wild Dogs (Lycaon pictus) in Botswana

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Valli-Laurente Fraser-Celin, Alice J. Hovorka

    This paper argues for a more compassionate conservation by positioning animals as subjects in research and scholarship. Compassionate conservation is a multidisciplinary field of study that broadly attends to the ethical dimensions of conservation by merging conservation biology and animal...

  10. The Ethics of Wildlife Control in Humanized Landscapes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: John Hadidian, Camilla H. Fox, William S. Lynn

    The 21st century is witness to an unprecedented and rapid growth of human settlements, from urban centers to wilderness vacation resorts. Concurrent with this has been the growing tolerance and acceptance of many wild animals and humans for one another. This has created an expanding...

  11. Performing Whale-Watching in Juneau, Alaska

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Chelsea Karthauser

    Nature-based tourism activities provide special contexts for human-wildlife interaction. In Juneau, Alaska, summertime tourists seek encounters with humpback whales, hundreds of which feed seasonally in Southeast Alaska’s coastal waterways. Tourists support a thriving whale-watching...

  12. Who's a Good Handler? Important Skills and Personality Profiles of Wildlife Detection Dog Handlers

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: La Toya J. Jamieson, Greg S. Baxter, Peter J. Murray

    Wildlife detection dog teams are employed internationally for environmental surveys, and their success often depends on the dog handler. Minimal research is available on the skills that dog handlers believe are important, and no research has been published on the personality profiles of...

  13. Not your regular cat person | Latika Nath | TEDxBITSPilani

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Latika Nath

    Latika Nath is a conservational ecologist and a wildlife photographer. She was awarded the title of ‘The Tiger Princess’ by National Geographic in 2001 which featured her work. She is the first woman biologist in India with a doctorate on tigers. She has spent over twenty-five years...

  14. Conserving Vermont's Endangered Species through Designation of Critical Habitat

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Amanda M. Ramsing-Lund

    Although the Endangered Species Act of 1973 is federal legislation, protection of threatened and endangered (T & E) species varies in stringency across states. H.570 (Act 145) is a Vermont law passed during the 2015-2016 legislative session that updated some of the legal protections for T...

  15. Space use by resident and transient coyotes in an urban–rural landscape mosaic

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Numi Mitchell, MichaelW. Strohbach, Ralph Pratt, Wendy C. Finn, Eric G. Strauss

    Context. Coyotes (Canis latrans) have adapted successfully to human landscape alteration in the past 150 years and in recent decades have successfully moved into urban areas. While this causes concern about human–wildlife conflicts, research also suggests that coyotes tend to avoid humans...

  16. Parental Habituation to Human Disturbance Over Time Reduces Fear of Humans in Coyote Offspring

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Christopher J. Schell, Julie K. Young, Elizabeth V. Lonsdorf, Rachel M. Santymire, Jill M. Mateo

    A fundamental tenet of maternal effects assumes that maternal variance over time should have discordant consequences for offspring traits across litters. Yet, seldom are parents observed across multiple reproductive bouts, with few studies consider‐ ing anthropogenic disturbances as an...

  17. How bees can keep the peace between elephants and humans | Lucy King

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lucy King

    Imagine waking in the middle of the night to an elephant ripping the roof from your house in search of food. This is a reality in some communities in Africa where, as wild spaces shrink, people and elephants are competing for space and resources like never before. In this engaging talk,...

  18. Human-wildlife conflict-causes, consequences and mitigation measures with special reference to Kashmir

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Aadil Habib, Ishfaq Nazir, Mustahson F. Fazili, Bilal A. Bhat

    The rising levels of man-animal conflicts at various locations of Kashmir valley in India are due to close proximity between humans and wild carnivores particularly leopard and black bear. The data regarding human injuries and mortalities caused during conflicts from 2010 to 2012 was collected...

  19. Deadly cures: how venomous animals could save your life | Glenn King | TEDxUQ

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Glenn King

    Creepy crawlies are much more than the stuff of nightmares. Animal venoms have numerous properties that could serve as exceptional therapeutics for life-threatening medical conditions. Professor Glenn King, a pioneer in development of new applications for animal venom, believes the next...

  20. Hunting as a Management Tool? Cougar-Human Conflict is Positively Related to Trophy Hunting

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kristine J. Teichman, Bogdan Cristescu, Chris T. Darimont

    Background: Overexploitation and persecution of large carnivores resulting from conflict with humans comprise major causes of declines worldwide. Although little is known about the interplay between these mortality types, hunting of predators remains a common management strategy aimed at...