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  1. Friday essay: the cultural meanings of wild horses

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Michael J. Adams

    From 30,000-year-old cave paintings to The Man From Snowy River, wild horses have always been part of human culture. As Australia debates what to do with 'brumbies' in mountain environments, it's time to reconsider their place.

  2. Synanthropic Suburbia

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sarah Gunawan

    Animals are invading the city. Coyotes are sighted on downtown streets with greater frequency, raccoons notoriously forage through greenbins as their primary source of food, and all forms of animals inhabit the surfaces, edges and cavities of the built environment. Once wild animals are now...

  3. Human–Black Bear Conflicts: A Review of Common Management Practices

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Carl W. Lackey, Stewart W. Breck, Brian F. Wakeling, Bryant White

    The objective of this monograph is to provide wildlife professionals, who respond to human–bear conflicts, with an appraisal of the most common techniques used for mitigating conflicts as well as the benefits and challenges of each technique in a single document. Most human–black...

  4. Damage to Salamandra infraimmaculata Populations by Human Activity in Creating Water Pits Is a Death Trap in Semi-Arid Habitats

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Gad Degani, Udi Grosman, Tali Goldberg, Nadav Hanegbi

    The different breeding sites of Salamandra infraimmaculata on the southern border of its distribution were examined and mapped in order to estimate the damage caused by water holes that could represent death traps for salamanders in xeric habitats. Among the various types of breeding...

  5. State Management of Human–Wildlife Conflicts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kurt C. VerCauteren, Daniel Hirchert, Scott Hygnstrom

    Many positive experiences are associated with wildlife, from passively watching animals in our backyards to actively hunting in publicly owned forests. Unfortunately, wildlife can be a double- edged sword. Human– wildlife conflicts are pervasive in society, and nearly all...

  6. Encounters with whales '93 : a conference to further explore the management isues relating to human/whale interactions

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Deb Postle, Mark Simmons

    Within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park there has also been an increase over the past few years in the number of tourist operators applying for permits to run commercial whale watching activities. In the Whitsunday Islands region, which is already a heavily used recreational and commercial...

  7. Preventing an Africa without the African Lion

    Full-text: Available

    The African lion (Panthera leo) population is diminishing rapidly, approximately 43 percent since 1993. The species is currently listed as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). With numerous threats to current populations including human conflict, prey...

  8. Music Festival Makes Hedgehogs Move: How Individuals Cope Behaviorally in Response to Human-Induced Stressors

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Wanja Rast, Leon M.F. Barthel, Anne Berger

    Understanding the impact of human activities on wildlife behavior and fitness can improve their sustainability. In a pilot study, we wanted to identify behavioral responses to anthropogenic stress in an urban species during a semi-experimental field study. We equipped eight urban hedgehogs...

  9. Learning to Live With Wolves: Community-based Conservation in the Blackfoot Valley of Montana

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Seth M. Wilson, Elizabeth H. Bradley, Gregory A. Neudecker

    We built on the existing capacity of a nongovernmental organization called the Blackfoot Challenge to proactively address wolf (Canis lupus)-livestock conflicts in the Blackfoot Valley of Montana. Beginning in 2007, wolves started rapidly recolonizing the valley, raising concerns among...

  10. Lead Poisoning in Bald Eagles Admitted to Wildlife Rehabilitation Facilities in Iowa, 2004–2014

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Taylor Yaw, Kay Neumann, Linette Bernard, Jodeane Cancilla, Terese Evans, Adam Martin-Schwarze, Bianca Zaffarano

    Eleven years (2004–2014) of bald eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus data from four independent, state and federally permitted wildlife rehabilitators in Iowa were assessed for the prevalence of elevated lead levels in blood or tissue samples. The relationship between blood lead...

  11. Management and modeling approaches for controlling raccoon rabies: The road to elimination

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Stacey A. Elmore, Richard B. Chipman, Dennis Slate, Kathryn P. Huyvaert, Kurt C. VerCauteren, Amy T. Gilbert

    Rabies is an ancient viral disease that significantly impacts human and animal health throughout the world. In the developing parts of the world, dog bites represent the highest risk of rabies infection to people, livestock, and other animals. However, in North America, where several rabies...

  12. We Are Not Equals: Socio-Cognitive Dimensions of Lion/Human Relationships

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Marcus Baynes-Rock, Elizabeth Marshall Thomas

    This article documents a peaceful, albeit tense relationship between Ju/’hoan and lions in the Nyae Nyae region of the Kalahari during the 1950s.1 Unlike contexts where lions kill livestock and people and are persecuted in return, the Ju/’hoan and lions of the Nyae Nyae shared...

  13. All That Fuss Just for Some Bloody Badgers? The Politics of Wildlife in Infrastructure Construction

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Daniel Sage, Andy Dainty, Kjell Tryggestad, Lise Justesen, Jan Mouritsen

    Across many construction projects, and especially infrastructure projects, efforts to mitigate the potential loss of biodiversity and habitat are significant, and at times controversial. In our paper we do not propose to gauge the success or failure of this effort; rather we are interested in...

  14. Coyote (Canis latrans) diet in an urban environment: variation relative to pet conflicts, housing density, and season

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: S. A. Poessel, E. C. Mock, S. W. Breck

    Coyotes (Canis latrans Say, 1823) are highly successful in urbanized environments, but as they populate cities, conflict can occur and often manifests in the form of incidents with pets. To better understand whether coyotes view pets as prey or, alternatively, as competitors or a threat,...

  15. Le chien : un loup domestiqué pour communiquer avec l'homme : l'agressivité du chien

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jean-Marie Giffroy

    Il est établi, sur la base des recherches en archéozoologie et en génétique moléculaire, que le loup serait le principal ancêtre du chien et que la domestication se serait produite il y a 14000 ou 15000 ans, soit 5000 ans avant la domestication d'une...

  16. Large Terrestrial Bird Adapting Behavior in an Urbanized Zone

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Eduardo R. Alexandrino, Juliano A. Bogoni, Ana B. Navarro, Alex A. A. Bovo, Rafael M. Gonçalves, Jacob D. Charters, Juan A. Domini, Katia M. P. M. B. Ferraz

    Wildlife living within urban ecosystems have to adapt or perish. Red-legged Seriema, a large terrestrial bird, are rare in urban ecosystems, however, they have been reported in a medium-sized Brazilian city. We investigated the reasons for this occurrence as well as their behavior. We assessed...

  17. Large Birds of Prey, Policies That Alter Food Availability and Air Traffic: a Risky Mix for Human Safety

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Rubén Moreno-Opo, Antoni Margalida

    Raptors are considered to pose one of the greatest aviation bird strike risk. We investigated raptor bird strikes reported at the largest Spanish airport (Adolfo Suárez Madrid Barajas; AS-MB) from 2009 to 2016 to determine the factors contributing to the increased incidences and develop...

  18. The cohabitation of humans and urban cats in the anthropocene: the clash of welfare concepts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jaros, F.

    Urban environments are inhabited by several types of feline populations, which we can differentiate as feral cats, free-roaming pets, and confined pets. Due to a shift in the cultural representation of cats from pest controllers to companion animals, cats living semi-independently of humans are...

  19. The Elephant (Head) in the Room: A Critical Look at Trophy Hunting

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Chelsea Batavia, Michael Paul Nelson, Chris T. Darimont, Paul C. Paquet, William J. Ripple, Arian D. Wallach

    Trophy hunting has occupied a prominent position in recent scholarly literature and popular media. In the scientific conservation literature, researchers are generally supportive of or sympathetic to its usage as a source of monetary support for conservation. Although authors at times...

  20. Space Use and Movement of Urban Bobcats

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Julie K. Young, Julie Golla, John P. Draper, Derek Broman, Terry Blankenship, Richard Heilbrun

    Global urbanization is rapidly changing the landscape for wildlife species that must learn to persist in declining wild spacing, adapt, or risk extinction. Many mesopredators have successfully exploited urban niches, and research on these species in an urban setting offers insights into the...