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  1. Intraspecific Motor and Emotional Alignment in Dogs and Wolves: The Basic Building Blocks of Dog–Human Affective Connectedness

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Elisabetta Palagi, Giada Cordoni

    Involuntary synchronization occurs when individuals perform the same motor action patterns during a very short time lapse. This phenomenon serves an important adaptive value for animals permitting them to socially align with group fellows thus increasing integration and fitness benefits. Rapid...

  2. Understanding stakeholders perception towards human-wildlife interaction and conflict in a tiger landscape-complex of India

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ronak T. Sripal

    Human-population of the earth exceeding 6 billion and growing at an estimates rate of 1.2% per year (US census Bureau, 2002) will lead to increase in human-wildlife encounters. Attacks on humans are perhaps the least understood of these encounters, but the most interesting and emotionally...

  3. I Am a Compassionate Conservation Welfare Scientist: Considering the Theoretical and Practical Differences Between Compassionate Conservation and Conservation Welfare

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ngaio J. Beausoleil

    Compassionate Conservation and Conservation Welfare are two disciplines whose practitioners advocate consideration of individual wild animals within conservation practice and policy. However, they are not, as is sometimes suggested, the same. Compassionate Conservation and Conservation Welfare...

  4. Integrating Emotional Affect into Bear Viewing Management and Bear Safety Education

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: John Nettles

    The popularity of viewing wildlife, specifically brown bears (Ursus arctos), is increasing rapidly throughout North America, from Yellowstone National Park (NP) to Denali National Park. In addition, population distributions of both humans and brown bears are expanding, creating larger areas of...

  5. Sustainable Whale-watching for the Philippines: A Bioeconomic Model of the Spinner Dolphin (Stenella Longirostris)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Allison Jenny Santos

    Whale-watching provides economic opportunities worldwide and particularly proliferates in developing countries, such as the Philippines. The sustainability of whale-watching is increasingly debated as these activities also negatively impact cetaceans through changes in behavior, communication,...

  6. The Effect of Boat Type on Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops trucatus) Behavior in the Mississippi Sound

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Maria Zapetis

    Increases in oceanic shipping are a global phenomenon, and a leading cause of concern for marine animal welfare. While it may be difficult to assess the effect of boat traffic on all species in all contexts, it is vital to report anthropogenic impacts where longitudinal data is available, and...

  7. Living with Giants: Human-Elephant Conflict and Poaching in Myanmar

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Christie Lynn Sampson

    To address both the impacts of poaching on the wildlife and human populations and create effective conservation policy, conservation efforts must engage communities and include their views as stakeholders in the development of the policy. The involvement of local people has been shown to...

  8. The Perceptions of Michigan Hunters Regarding Wolves (Canis Lupus) and the ldea of a Wolf-Hunt as a Management Option

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Zachary A. Merrill

    Gray wolves (Canis lupus) are an important keystone species in mixed forest ecosystems throughout the Great Lakes region. Due to wolves being placed on the Endangered Species List in 1974, the wolf population of Michigan has increased from near extinction in 1974 to greater than 650 in 2013....

  9. Zoonotic nematodes of wild carnivores

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Domenico Otranto, Peter Deplazes

    For a long time, wildlife carnivores have been disregarded for their potential in transmitting zoonotic nematodes. However, human activities and politics (e.g., fragmentation of the environment, land use, recycling in urban settings) have consistently favoured the encroachment of urban areas...

  10. Investigating the Cultural Context for Big Cat Conservation Around the World

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kathleen Elizabeth Krafte

    Populations of predators are in decline worldwide as human growth and development destroys and alters their habitats. At the same time, large predators are a tourist attraction in many regions of the world, bringing essential income to governments and local communities. The complex interactions...

  11. Is a wolf wild as long as it does not know that it is being thoroughly managed?

    | Contributor(s):: Tønnessen, Morten

  12. Identification of coronaviruses in farmed wild animals reveals their evolutionary origins in Guangdong, southern China

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Wang, X., Ren, Z., Wang, L., Chen, J., Zhang, P., Chen, J. P., Chen, X., Li, L., Lin, X., Qi, N., Luo, S., Xiang, R., Yuan, Z., Zhang, J., Wang, G., Sun, M. H., Huang, Y., Hua, Y., Zou, J., Hou, F., Huang, Z., Du, S., Xiang, H., Sun, M., Liu, Q., Liao, M.

    Coronavirus infections cause diseases that range from mild to severe in mammals and birds. In this study, we detected coronavirus infections in 748 farmed wild animals of 23 species in Guangdong, southern China, by RT-PCR and metagenomic analysis. We identified four coronaviruses in these wild...

  13. The Influence of Flagship Species on In situ and Ex situ Wildlife Tourists' Connection to Wildlife and Pro-Conservation Behaviors

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jeffrey Skibins

    Annually, millions of tourists visit natural areas and zoos primarily to view flagship species such as lions and elephants. Venues rely on the inherent charisma of these species to increase visitation and anchor conservation efforts. Expected visitor outcomes from the use of flagships include...

  14. Plasma Concentration of Advanced Glycation End-Products From Wild Canids and Domestic Dogs Does Not Change With Age or Across Body Masses

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ana Gabriela Jimenez

    Dogs provide a physiological paradox: In domestic dogs, small breeds live longer lives than large breed dogs. Comparatively, a wild canid can be a similar size than many large breed dogs and outlive their domestic cousin. We have previously shown that oxidative stress patterns between domestic...

  15. The Effects of Environmental Education on Children's Knowledge of Elephant Conservation in Rural and Urban Thailand

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Tamara Aird

    Think Elephants International’s EE program educated students on issues surrounding elephant conservation. One open-ended response question from surveys was analyzed to determine whether there was a knowledge difference between locations. After participation, urban students referenced more...

  16. Living With Coyotes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Owen H. Agnew

    Coyotes have been slowly moving into New York State from Canada since the 1930s. They reached Westchester County and the Bronx decades ago, and their numbers have been slowly rising. Sighting in Manhattan reached an all-time high last spring, and pet attacks in Westchester County have increased...

  17. The tail wagging the dog: positive attitude towards livestock guarding dogs do not mitigate pastoralists' opinions of wolves or grizzly bears

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Daniel Kinka, Julie K. Young

    While the re-establishment of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) and wolves (Canis lupus) in the American West marks a success for conservation, it has been contentious among pastoralists. Coincidentally, livestock guarding dogs (LGDs; Canis familiaris) have been widely adopted by producers of...

  18. Are Coyotes "Natural"? Differences in Perceptions of Coyotes Among Urban and Suburban Park Users

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Brielle R. Manzolillo, Carol S. Henger, Tatyana Graham, Nadya Hall, Anne H. Toomey

    By 2050 more than 65% of humans are expected to live in urban and suburban areas. This shift has gained the attention of conservation scientists and managers with more focus directed on conflict and coexistence between wildlife and urbanized populations. One species that is increasingly...

  19. Maladaptation in feral and domesticated animals

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Eben Gering, Darren Incorvaia, Rie Henriksen, Dominic Wright, Thomas Getty

    Selection regimes and population structures can be powerfully changed by domestication and feralization, and these changes can modulate animal fitness in both captive and natural environments. In this review, we synthesize recent studies of these two processes and consider their impacts on...

  20. A Ten-Stage Protocol for Assessing the Welfare of Individual Non-Captive Wild Animals: Free-Roaming Horses (Equus Ferus Caballus) as an Example

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Andrea M. Harvey, Ngaio J. Beausoleil, Daniel Ramp, David J. Mellor

    Knowledge of the welfare status of wild animals is vital for informing debates about the ways in which we interact with wild animals and their habitats. Currently, there is no published information about how to scientifically assess the welfare of free-roaming wild animals during their normal...