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  1. An Institutional Analysis of Ontario's Endangered Species Act: Investigating the Implementation Challenges

    Contributor(s):: Nafisa Sarwath

    In a rapidly changing environment, management of natural resources is essential. Currently the world is undergoing a rapid loss of biodiversity through extinctions caused by human activities. Despite the alarming rate of species endangerment and subsequent loss, efforts to reduce species loss...

  2. Assessment of wildlife value orientations, state agency credibility, and tolerance for mountain lions in Iowa

    Contributor(s):: Andrew L. Stephenson

    It is increasingly necessary for state agencies to incorporate the opinions of their constituents in wildlife management decision-making. Shifting demographics of Iowa's human population necessitate gathering information on stakeholders' beliefs and values toward wildlife. This project...

  3. Attitudes Toward and Perceptions of Deer Management in Suburban Boston

    Contributor(s):: Michael Devito

    Communities in the United States have experienced a large and growing white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population. Residents in these communities may enjoy encounters with white-tailed deer, but they also perceive problems with deer such as car collisions, garden damage, and Lyme...

  4. Bird-Watchers', Hunters', and Wildlife Professionals' Beliefs About the Importance and Management of Wildlife

    Contributor(s):: Daniel J. Witter

    Since the early 1930's, calls have been made for a uniting of hunters and nonhunters in support of wildlife conservation in the public sector. Today, however, such an alliance remains largely unfounded, with government wildlife agencies continuing to depend heavily on sportsmen for financial...

  5. Conservation or Exploitation? Assessing the Education Impact of Accredited Zoological Institutions

    Contributor(s):: Martina Kusiak

    Zoological institutions, and the animals that inhabit them, have fascinated people since their inception. Over time, the mandates of zoos and aquariums have evolved and diversified beyond their sole anthropocentric focus on human entertainment. Today, zoological institutions have mandates to...

  6. Ethics and Wolf Management: Attitudes Toward and Tolerance of Wolves in Washington State

    Contributor(s):: Julie Callahan

    Approximately seventy-five years after extirpation from Washington State, gray wolves (Canis lupus) returned. As of December 2012, eight packs had arrived from adjacent states and provinces. Delisted from the Federal Endangered Species List in the eastern one-third of Washington, state wildlife...

  7. Evaluating Human Threats to Three Canid Species of the Brazilian Cerrado

    Contributor(s):: Stacie M. Bickley

    The hoary fox (Lycalopex vetulus), crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous), and maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), are three canid species that are sympatric in the Brazilian Cerrado. In some areas in central Brazil, more than 80% of the Cerrado ecosystem has been converted into agricultural fields...

  8. Evaluating the role of citizen science in the context of human-wildlife conflict management

    Contributor(s):: Morgan Adams

        This thesis presents two manuscripts that explored the potential of citizen science programs to be utilized in urban centers that are experiencing heightened rates of human-wildlife conflict (HWC). In particular, we focused on human-coyote conflicts, which are an emerging...

  9. Examining the effects of urbanization on occurrence of mammal species in natural areas of the Eastern Edwards Plateau

    Contributor(s):: Matthew B. Haverland

    Central Texas is experiencing urbanization at an unprecedented rate. This anthropogenic conversion of land is due in part to a rapidly growing population in the Austin and San Antonio metro areas and the development of infrastructure and resources needed to support that growth. Urban parks,...

  10. Exploring Geospatial Trends in Urban Attitudes Toward Wolves in Wisconsin and Implications for Future Management

    Contributor(s):: Peter Hudack, Danielle Felgenhauer, Lizzi Slivinski, Annie Johnson

    In 2004, the recovering Wisconsin timber wolf (Canis lupus) population reached the state management goal, set by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, of 350 wolves. Since then, the state's wolf population has nearly doubled to the current population of 690 wolves (97 percent...

  11. Killing to Save: Trophy Hunting and Conservation in Mongolia

    Contributor(s):: Lucy Page

    Since transitioning to capitalism in 1990, Mongolia’s wildlife has faced growing threats from the development of infrastructure, increasing livestock populations, and the expansion of an illegal trade in wildlife products. As wildlife populations face these growing risks, Mongolia needs to...

  12. Knowledge, attitudes, and opinions about human-wildlife conflicts held by community leaders in Virginia

    Contributor(s):: Regina M. Elsner

    Using a mail survey, I questioned 490 representatives of local government (i.e., elected officials, administrative officials, animal control officers, and county Cooperative Extension agents) about their understanding of human-wildlife conflicts in their communities, and their receptivity to...

  13. Making Space for Mexican Wolves: Technology, Knowledge and Conservation Politics

    Contributor(s):: Paula D. Decker

    The use of geospatial technologies, including radio telemetry, GPS collars, and mapping software, has proliferated in wildlife conservation. In addition to being tools for research, though, tracking devices are increasingly used to control animals that have been reintroduced to natural areas....

  14. Post-occupancy Evaluation at the Zoo: Behavioral and Hormonal Indicators of Welfare in Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii)

    Contributor(s):: Leigha Tingey

    An increased understanding of species-specific behavioral needs has lead zoos to focus on providing more naturalistic and stimulating environments. Scientific assessments of how changes in habitat affect animal behavior are necessary in improving overall animal welfare. This study examined the...

  15. Predicting the survival of woodland species in human-altered landscapes

    Contributor(s):: Kringen M. Henein

    Rapid, large-scale anthropogenic landscape change increasingly challenges native species.  The identification of factors affecting species persistence is needed to direct planning and land management.I designed an individual-based simulation model to examine the relationship among 3...

  16. Returning wildlife management to local control in the Northwest Territories

    Contributor(s):: John Donihee

  17. Social Conflict and Human-Coyote Interactions in Suburban Denver

    Contributor(s):: Draheim, Megan M.

    In 2009, Greenwood Village and Centennial, Colorado (two bordering suburban towns south of Denver), passed coyote management plans in response to community concerns over human-coyote interactions. Although both plans are similar in many respects, theydiffer in some key ways, including...

  18. Survey of Attitudes Toward, Conflicts With and Management Of Wolves and Bears in Rural Villages in Armenia

    Contributor(s):: Serda Ozbenian

    Many studies aimed at assessing human attitudes towards and negative interactions  (conflicts) with carnivores, such as wolves (Canis lupus) and bears (Ursus arctos), have  been conducted throughout the world. Although villagers in Armenia have reported  conflicts with these...

  19. The Altruism-Empathy-Perspective Connection: A Case Study of Human-Wildlife Interactions at Chintimini Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, Corvallis, Oregon

    Contributor(s):: Kirsten S. Freed

    In the realms of psychology and sociology two new theoretical models have arisen to describe the forces influencing altruistic human behavior. The first is the Empathy-Altruism Hypothesis (EAH), by C.D. Batson. The second is the Conceptual Continuum of Altruism (CCA), by K.R. Monroe. Both models...

  20. The impact of a wolf conservation project on attitudes of the public, hunters and farmers toward wolves in Slovenia

    Contributor(s):: Jasna Mulej Tlhaolang

    For successful conservation of large carnivores, charismatic and controversial species, ensuring human tolerance is essential. Therefore, wolf conservation projects aim to improve both the biological and socio-political conditions. I used a mixed methods approach to explore the effectiveness of a...