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  1. Living with wildlife : the biology and sociology of suburban deer and beaver

    Contributor(s):: Rowan, Andrew N., Weer, Joan C., Pease, Donna

  2. Mad about wildlife : looking at social conflict over wildlife

    Contributor(s):: Herda-Rapp, Ann, Goedeke, Theresa L.

  3. Making Space for Mexican Wolves: Technology, Knowledge and Conservation Politics

    Contributor(s):: Paula D. Decker

    The use of geospatial technologies, including radio telemetry, GPS collars, and mapping software, has proliferated in wildlife conservation. In addition to being tools for research, though, tracking devices are increasingly used to control animals that have been reintroduced to natural areas....

  4. Mammal trapping: a review of animal welfare standards of killing and restraining traps

    Contributor(s):: Iossa, G., Soulsbury, C. D., Harris, S.

    Millions of wild mammals are trapped annually for fur, pest control and wildlife management. Ensuring the welfare of trapped individuals can only be achieved by trapping methods that meet accepted standards of animal welfare. At the international level, the assessment of mechanical properties of...

  5. Modeling the economic impacts of double-crested cormorant damage to a recreational fishery

    Contributor(s):: Shwiff, Stephanie A., Kirkpatrick, Katy N., DeVault, Travis L., Shwiff, Steven S.

  6. Monitoring raccoon rabies in Alabama: the potential effects of habitat and demographics

    Contributor(s):: Wendy Arjo, Christine Fisher, James Armstrong, Dana Johnson, Frank Boyd

    Density, morphometrics, and disease prevalence of raccoon populations were determined in 4 habitats (agriculture, riverine, managed, and forested) in central Alabama. In addition we monitored 71 collared raccoons to determine survival. Density estimates were similar in the agriculture (ag) and...

  7. Multiple-species exclusion fencing and technology for mainland sites

    Contributor(s):: Tim Day, Roger MacGibbon

    Eradication of invasive vertebrate pests from increasingly large islands has become an important wildlife management and conservation tool internationally. Success on islands has prompted attempts to exclude and eradicate vertebrate pests from mainland sites. Early mainland exclusion efforts...

  8. Nuisance American alligators: an investigation into trends and public opinion

    Contributor(s):: Eversole, Cord B., Henke, Scott E., Ogdee, Jacob L., Wester, David B., Cooper, Amos

  9. Outdoor fecal deposition by free-roaming cats and attitudes of cat owners and nonowners toward stray pets, wildlife, and water pollution

    Contributor(s):: Dabritz, H. A., Atwill, E. R., Gardner, I. A., Miller, M. A., Conrad, P. A.

  10. Parallel universes? Increasing connections between IPM and WDM

    Contributor(s):: Braband, Lynn

  11. Patterns of human-coyote conflicts in the Denver Metropolitan Area

    Contributor(s):: Poessel, S. A., Breck, S. W., Teel, T. L., Shwiff, S., Crooks, K. R., Angeloni, L.

  12. Perceptions and attitudes of a Maasai community regarding wildlife-damage compensation, conservation, and the predators that prey on their livestock

    Contributor(s):: Rodriguez, Shari Lynn

    Worldwide, carnivore numbers are declining, largely due to conflict with humans. Wildlife-damage compensation schemes are one potential way to increase tolerance for carnivores while minimizing financial losses people incur when carnivores prey on livestock. The Predator Compensation Fund (PCF)...

  13. Perceptions of Hunting and Hunters by U.S. Respondents

    Contributor(s):: Elizabeth Byrd, John G. Lee, NIcole J. Olynk Widmar

    Public acceptance of hunting and hunting practices is an important human dimension of wildlife management in the United States. Researchers surveyed 825 U.S. residents in an online questionnaire about their views of hunting, hunters, and hunting practices. Eighty-seven percent of respondents from...

  14. Pet ownership, attitude toward pets, and support for wildlife management strategies

    Contributor(s):: Shuttlewood, C. Z., Greenwell, P. J., Montrose, V. T.

    Pet ownership affects engagement with animal-related activities and may be related to support of wildlife management. British participants ( N=220) completed an online survey providing information on pet ownership, attitudes toward pets, and support for wildlife management strategies. Within this...

  15. Population dynamics of mouflon in a protected area of the Italian Alps

    Contributor(s):: Bertolino, S., Hardenberg, A. von, Ribetto, G.

  16. Post-occupancy Evaluation at the Zoo: Behavioral and Hormonal Indicators of Welfare in Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii)

    Contributor(s):: Leigha Tingey

    An increased understanding of species-specific behavioral needs has lead zoos to focus on providing more naturalistic and stimulating environments. Scientific assessments of how changes in habitat affect animal behavior are necessary in improving overall animal welfare. This study examined the...

  17. Potential welfare impacts of kill-trapping European moles ( Talpa europaea) using scissor traps and duffus traps: a post mortem examination study

    Contributor(s):: Baker, S. E., Shaw, R. F., Atkinson, R. P. D., West, P., Macdonald, D. W.

    Moles are widely trapped as pests on farms and amenity land in Britain. Spring traps for killing mammals generally require welfare approval in the UK, but mole traps are exempt. Previous research demonstrated wide variation in the mechanical performance of mole traps. In this context, we aimed to...

  18. Predicting the survival of woodland species in human-altered landscapes

    Contributor(s):: Kringen M. Henein

    Rapid, large-scale anthropogenic landscape change increasingly challenges native species.  The identification of factors affecting species persistence is needed to direct planning and land management.I designed an individual-based simulation model to examine the relationship among 3...

  19. Protecting egg prey from Carrion Crows: the potential of aversive conditioning

    Contributor(s):: Cox, R., Baker, S. E., Macdonald, D. W., Berdoy, M.

    Carrion Crows, Corvus corone, are held responsible for taking the eggs and chicks of many bird species. In areas of conservation significance, intervention may be required. Traditionally, managers have attempted to control predation by killing predators, but this may not be the most effective or...

  20. Radio-telemetry and geographical information systems to assess urban deer zoonoses

    Contributor(s):: Karmen M. Hollis, Christopher L. Anchor, James E. Chelsvig, Dwayne R. Etter, J. P. Dubey

    Urban white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) populations can influence the epidemiology of many zoonotic diseases because they affect the distribution and abundance of pathogens and vectors. The risk of emerging zoonotic pathogens increases with human populations, as people have closer...