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  1. Breed group differences in the unsolvable problem task: Herding dogs prefer their owner, while solitary hunting dogs seek stranger proximity

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Van Poucke, Enya, Höglin, Amanda, Jensen, Per, Roth, Lina S. V.

    The communicating skills of dogs are well documented and especially their contact-seeking behaviours towards humans. The aim of this study was to use the unsolvable problem paradigm to investigate differences between breed groups in their contact-seeking behaviours towards their owner and a...

  2. The tail wagging the dog: positive attitude towards livestock guarding dogs do not mitigate pastoralists' opinions of wolves or grizzly bears

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Daniel Kinka, Julie K. Young

    While the re-establishment of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) and wolves (Canis lupus) in the American West marks a success for conservation, it has been contentious among pastoralists. Coincidentally, livestock guarding dogs (LGDs; Canis familiaris) have been widely adopted by producers of...

  3. Dogs and wolves differ in their response allocation to their owner/caregiver or food in a concurrent choice procedure

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Isernia, L., Wynne, C. D. L., House, L., Feuerbacher, E. N.

     Dogs and wolves both show attachment-like behaviors to their owners/caregivers, including exploring more in the presence of the owner/caregiver, and greeting the owner/caregiver more effusively after an absence. Concurrent choice studies can elucidate dogs’ and wolves’...

  4. Back to the Future: A Glance Over Wolf Social Behavior to Understand Dog–Human Relationship

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Giada Cordoni, Elisabetta Palagi

    This review focuses on wolf sociobiology to delineate the traits of cooperative baggage driven by natural selection (wolf-wolf cooperation) and better understand the changes obtained by artificial selection (dog-human cooperation). We selected some behaviors of the dog’s...

  5. Human Induced Rotation and Reorganization of the Brain of Domestic Dogs

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Taryn Roberts, Paul McGreevy, Michael Valenzuela

    Domestic dogs exhibit an extraordinary degree of morphological diversity. Such breed-to-breed variability applies equally to the canine skull, however little is known about whether this translates to systematic differences in cerebral organization. By looking at the paramedian sagittal magnetic...

  6. Status and Magnitude of Grey Wolf Conflict with Pastoral Communities in the Foothills of the Hindu Kush Region of Pakistan

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Tauheed Ullah Khan, Xiaofeng Luan, Shahid Ahmad, Abdul Mannan, Waqif Khan, Abdul Aziz Khan, Barkat Ullah Khan, Emad Ud Din, Suman Bhattarai, Sher Shah, Sajjad Saeed, Ummay Amara

    Pastoralist–wolf conflict over livestock depredation is the main factor affecting conservation of grey wolf worldwide. Very limited research has been carried out to evaluate the pattern and nature of livestock depredation by wolf. This study aims to determine the status and nature of...

  7. Is livestock husbandry more stressing than other anthropic activities to wild carnivores?

    | Contributor(s):: Arzabe, Ariel A., Retamal, Patricio, Simonetti, Javier A.

  8. Ballot Measures and Subversion of Direct Democracy: Initiatives to Outlaw Aerial Wolf Killing in Alaska

    | Contributor(s):: Simon, Alexander, Clark, Steven C.

  9. Effects of Visitors and Enrichments on Behavior of Captive Red Wolves' (Canis rufus) at the Great Plains Zoo, Sioux Falls, South Dakota

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kylee S. Shotkoski

    Red wolves (Canis rufus) are the first animals to maintain a wild population from captive, released individuals. A captive breeding program for red wolves was started before complete extirpation, and 4 breeding pairs were released in Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge (North Carolina) in...

  10. Analysis of tooth mark patterns on bone remains caused by wolves (Canis lupus) and domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) for taxonomic identification: A scoping review focused on their value as a forensic tool

    | Contributor(s):: Toledo González, Víctor, Ortega Ojeda, Fernando, Fonseca, Gabriel M., García-Ruiz, Carmen, Pérez-Lloret, Pilar

  11. Learning to Live With Wolves: Community-based Conservation in the Blackfoot Valley of Montana

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Seth M. Wilson, Elizabeth H. Bradley, Gregory A. Neudecker

    We built on the existing capacity of a nongovernmental organization called the Blackfoot Challenge to proactively address wolf (Canis lupus)-livestock conflicts in the Blackfoot Valley of Montana. Beginning in 2007, wolves started rapidly recolonizing the valley, raising concerns among...

  12. Feeding Enrichment in a Captive Pack of European Wolves (Canis Lupus Lupus): Assessing the Effects on Welfare and on a Zoo's Recreational, Educational and Conservational Role

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Giacomo Riggio, Chiara Mariti, Chiara Boncompagni, Simone Corosaniti, Massimiliano Di Giovanni, Asahi Ogi, Angelo Gazzano, Robert Thomas

    This study investigated the effects of two feeding enrichment programs on the behaviour of a captive pack of European wolves (Canis lupus lupus) and their correlation with both zoo visitors’ interest towards the exhibit and their overall perception of the species. Behavioural data...

  13. Conserving Wolves by Transforming Them? The Transformative Effects of Technologies of Government in Biodiversity Conservation

    | Contributor(s):: Stokland, Håkon B.

  14. Wolves and dogs recruit human partners in the cooperative string-pulling task

    | Contributor(s):: Range, F., Kassis, A., Taborsky, M., Boada, M., Marshall-Pescini, S.

  15. The effect of zoo visitors on the behaviour and faecal cortisol of the Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi)

    | Contributor(s):: Pifarré, María, Valdez, Ricardo, González-Rebeles, Carlos, Vázquez, Carlos, Romano, Marta, Galindo, Francisco

    The effect of zoo visitors on the behaviour and physiological responses of the Mexican wolf has not been documented but is worthy of investigation since it is a critically endangered native species and most of the population live in zoos. The effect of the number of visitors was assessed in 12...

  16. Evolution of facial muscle anatomy in dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Kaminski, J., Waller, B. M., Diogo, R., Hartstone-Rose, A., Burrows, A. M.

    Domestication shaped wolves into dogs and transformed both their behavior and their anatomy. Here we show that, in only 33,000 y, domestication transformed the facial muscle anatomy of dogs specifically for facial communication with humans. Based on dissections of dog and wolf heads, we show that...

  17. An ounce of prevention: Quantifying the effects of non-lethal tools on wolf behavior

    | Contributor(s):: Much, Rebecca M., Breck, Stewart W., Lance, Nathan J., Callahan, Peggy

    Human-carnivore conflict is presently on the rise as human populations continue to grow and carnivore conservation efforts gain precedence. The behaviors exhibited by carnivores that cause conflict are often learned; therefore, reducing learning potential though the use of non-lethal tools is...

  18. Assessing Patterns of Human-Wildlife Conflicts and Compensation around a Central Indian Protected Area

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Krithi K. Karanth, Arjun M. Gopalaswamy, Ruth DeFries, Natasha Ballal

    Mitigating crop and livestock loss to wildlife and improving compensation distribution are important for conservation efforts in landscapes where people and wildlife co-occur outside protected areas. The lack of rigorously collected spatial data poses a challenge to management efforts to...

  19. What Your Dog Can Teach You About Aliens | Arik Kershenbaum | TEDxCambridgeUniversity

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Arik Kershenbaum

    Animal communication on Earth shows us fundamental constraints on language that would also apply on any other planet. Dr Arik Kershenbaum is a zoologist at the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of Girton College. He researches animal communication, particularly in cooperative predators like...

  20. Training Reduces Stress in Human-Socialised Wolves to the Same Degree as in Dogs

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Angélica da Silva Vasconcellos, Zsófia Virányi, Friederike Range, César Ades, Jördis Kristin Scheidegger, Erich Möstl, Kurt Kotrschal

    The welfare of animals in captivity is of considerable societal concern. A major source of stress, especially for wild animals, is the lack of control over their environment, which includes not being able to avoid contact with human beings. Paradoxically, some studies have shown that...