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  1. Changes in human health parameters associated with an immersive exhibit experience at a zoological institution

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Audrey A. Coolman, Amy Niedbalski, David M. Powell, Corinne P. Kozlowski, Ashley D. Franklin, Sharon L. Deem

    Zoological institutions often use immersive, naturalistic exhibits to create an inclusive atmosphere that is inviting for visitors while providing for the welfare of animals in their collections. In this study, we investigated physiological changes in salivary cortisol and blood pressure, as...

  2. Case Report: Subclinical Verminous Pneumonia and High Ambient Temperatures Had Severe Impact on the Anesthesia of Semi-domesticated Eurasian Tundra Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) With Medetomidine–Ketamine

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Morten Tryland, Terje D. Josefsen, Javier Sánchez Romano, Nina Marcin, Torill Mørk, Jon M. Arnemo

    Semidomesticated Eurasian tundra reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus, n = 21) were scheduled twice for chemical immobilization with medetomidine–ketamine as part of a scientific experiment in June 2014. During the first round of immobilizations, seven animals developed severe...

  3. Serum Protein Gel Agarose Electrophoresis in Captive Tigers

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Daniela Proverbio, Roberta Perego, Luciana Baggiani, Giuliano Ravasio, Daniela Giambellini, Eva Spada

    Given the endangered status of tigers (Panthera tigris), the health of each individual is important and any data on blood chemistry values can provide valuable information alongside the assessment of physical condition. The nature of tigers in the wild makes it is extremely difficult to obtain...

  4. Should we be keeping elephants in captivity?

    | Contributor(s):: Taylor, N.

  5. Spatial and Behavioral Patterns of Captive Coyotes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jeffrey T. Schultz

    Environmental enrichment is a technique used at many captive animal facilities that can improve the well-being of their animals. It seeks to enhance habitat features and promote natural behavior by providing a variety of practical ways for captive animals to control their environmental...

  6. The Struggle Itself Toward the Heights Is Enough to Fill a Man's Heart: Calling, Moral Duty, Meaningfulness and Existential Self of Zookeepers

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Luisa G. Allen

    Applying Existential Sociology (Douglas & Johnson 1977, Manning 1973, Lyman and Scott 1989, Kotarba and Fontana 1984) as a theoretical foundation, this thesis endeavors to formulate first-order experiential understanding of zookeepers. Utilized is a mixed method approach comprising the...

  7. Evaluation Tools for Educational Programs at Zoos Victoria

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Nicole Marie Packard, Michael Robert Clark, Erin Marie McConnaghy, Brian Grant Peterson

    Zoos Victoria recently introduced a new educational program, Education for Conservation (EfC), to teach visiting students about conservation practices. Our goal was to create a set of efficient tools to assess the effectiveness of EfC from the perspectives of Zoo educators, schoolteachers, and...

  8. Liminal Animals in Liminal Spaces: A Day at Berlin Zoo

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kristine Hill

    This reflexive essay is based on a visit to Berlin Zoo on an overcast February day. It attempts to make sense of the "zoo experience" through critical self-reflection and observations of how visitors relate to animal others. The concept of zoo inhabitants as liminal beings, neither...

  9. An Analysis of Innovate Training with Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Raymond John Van Steyn

    The National Aquarium in Baltimore, Maryland conducted a training program in 2014 to develop a gestural command for their dolphins called “innovate”. This training paradigm was developed to resemble the seminal research by Pryor, Haag and O’Reilly (1969), as well as more...

  10. Circadian Rhythm of Salivary Immunoglobulin A and Associations with Cortisol as A Stress Biomarker in Captive Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Tithipong Plangsangmas, Janine L. Brown, Chatchote Thitaram, Ayona Silva-Fletcher, Katie L. Edwards, Veerasak Punyapornwithaya, Patcharapa Towiboon, Chaleamchat Somgird

    Salivary immunoglobulin A (sIgA) has been proposed as a potential indicator of welfare for various species, including Asian elephants, and may be related to adrenal cortisol responses. This study aimed to distinguish circadian rhythm effects on sIgA in male and female Asian elephants and...

  11. Carcass Feeding for Captive Vultures: Testing Assumptions about Zoos and Effects on Birds and Visitors

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hannah Gaengler

    Carcass feeding is a potentially controversial feeding method for zoo animals. The common assumption is that many North American zoos refrain from feeding large carcasses to their carnivorous animals because zoo visitors might not approve of this feeding method. However, since there are several...

  12. Furred and feathered friends: how attached are zookeepers to the animals in their care?

    | Contributor(s):: Melfi, V., Skyner, L., Birke, L., Ward, S. J., Shaw, W. S., Hosey, G.

    Keeper-animal relationships (KARs) appear to be important in zoos, since they can enhance the well-being of both the animals and the keepers, can make animal husbandry easier, but conversely might risk inappropriate habituation of animals and possible risks to the safety of keepers. It is,...

  13. The Behavioral Effects of Feeding Enrichment on a Zoo-Housed Herd of African Elephants (Loxodonta africana)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Caroline Marie Driscoll

    A comprehensive study on the behavioral effects of feeding enrichment was conducted on six African elephants housed at the North Carolina Zoological Park in Asheboro, NC. The herd is comprised of are two adult males, three adult females, and one subadult female. The study was conducted over a...

  14. Evaluation of the Impact of Behavioral Opportunities on Four Zoo-Housed Aardvarks (Orycteropus afer)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jennifer Hamilton, Grace Fuller, Stephanie Allard

    Evaluations of enrichment are critical to determine if an enrichment program is meeting stated goals. However, nocturnal species can present a challenge if their active periods do not align with caretakers’ schedules. To evaluate enrichment for four aardvarks housed with a natural light...

  15. Oral, Cloacal, and Hemipenal Actinomycosis in Captive Ball Pythons (Python regius)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Steven B. Tillis, Marley E. Iredale, April L. Childress, Erin A. Graham, James F. X. Wellehan, Ramiro Isaza, Robert J. Ossiboff

    Ball pythons (Python regius) are one of the most commonly kept and bred reptiles in captivity. In a large ball python breeding colony, a unique syndrome characterized by granulomatous inflammation of the cloaca and hemipenes (phalli) was observed in 140 of 481 (29.1%) breeding males, but only...

  16. Using Thermal Imaging to Monitor Body Temperature of Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in A Zoo Setting

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Edward Narayan, Annabella Perakis, Will Meikle

    Non-invasive techniques can be applied for monitoring the physiology and behaviour of wildlife in Zoos to improve management and welfare. Thermal imaging technology has been used as a non-invasive technique to measure the body temperature of various domesticated and wildlife species. In this...

  17. Ireland Human-Animal Interactions Education Abroad

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lauren Hamer

    For my project I took course in Human-Animal Interactions then went abroad to Ireland with the Department of Animal Sciences to do study that same thing. While abroad for 9 days we visited zoos, animal rehabilitation centers, multiple farms, the University College of Dublin, and even some...

  18. Use of Vertical Enclosure Space and Species-Typical Locomotion by a Rehabilitating Spider Monkey (Ateles fusciceps)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jake Funkhouser

    With wild spider monkey populations in decline, investigations contributing to captive welfare, and successful rehabilitation and reintroduction knowledge is increasingly pressing. Quantifying and analyzing the appropriateness of naturalistic enclosure designs to foster species-typical...

  19. A Case Study: Observations of Behaviors & Vocalizations in a Captive Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus) During Quarantine

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Alexandra Dilley

    Bozie, an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus), was relocated from the Baton Rouge Zoo to Smithsonian’s National Zoo. During a requisite 29-day quarantine period, I recorded Bozie’s stress-related behaviors and the vocalizations she produced when she was alone and with her keepers in...

  20. Re-Evaluating Captive Chimpanzee "Dominance": Dominance Hierarchy and Chimpanzee-Caregiver Relationships at Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jake Alan Funkhouser

    This thesis is composed of two journal-ready articles and an accompanying appendix with additional data and interpretation. Overall, this thesis describes and statistically analyzes dominance relationships in two nonhuman primate groups with novel methods, possible correlations between...