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  1. Re-Evaluating Captive Chimpanzee "Dominance": Dominance Hierarchy and Chimpanzee-Caregiver Relationships at Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jake Alan Funkhouser

    This thesis is composed of two journal-ready articles and an accompanying appendix with additional data and interpretation. Overall, this thesis describes and statistically analyzes dominance relationships in two nonhuman primate groups with novel methods, possible correlations between...

  2. Contagious Yawning in African Elephants (Loxodonta africana): Responses to Other Elephants and Familiar Humans

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Zoë T. Rossman, Clare Padfield, Debbie Young, Benjamin L. Hart, Lynette A. Hart

    While spontaneous yawning is common across all vertebrate classes, contagious yawning is less common and has been observed only in a few species of social animals. Interspecific contagious yawning in response to yawning by humans has been observed only by chimpanzees and dogs. After...

  3. A Comparison of Chimpanzee (Pan Troglodytes) Responses to Caregiver Use of Positive Reinforcement Training (PRT) and Species-Specific Behaviors (SSB)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Whitney D. Emge

    The present study compared the effects of positive reinforcement training (PRT) and unstructured interactions (UI) on chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) behavior. In the PRT condition, a caregiver interacted with a chimpanzee to condition behaviors for 10 min. In the UI condition, a caregiver...

  4. Animals and Humans on Stage: Live Performances at Sea World on the Gold Coast

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Rebecca Scollen

    The purpose of this study is to investigate animal and human relations as constructed, and as demonstrated, through the live performances at Sea World on the Gold Coast, Australia. Particular attention is placed upon the meanings generated by the intersection of the starring animals and humans...

  5. Response of Three Species of Monkeys to Caregiver Use of Species-Typical Behavior

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lillian Anna Stolar

    Caregivers are a primary part of captive monkey environments. When addressing psychological well-being of captive nonhuman primates, social environment should be considered. Chimpanzees, gorillas, New World monkeys, and Old World monkeys responded positively to interactions with caregivers....

  6. Post-release activity and habitat selection of rehabilitated black bears

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Patrick J. Myers, Julie K. Young

    Despite the long history of wildlife rehabilitation and the abundance of empirical knowledge of the behavior and resource selection of wildlife species, rarely does research bridge these disciplines. Such investigations could be of value to wildlife managers and rehabilitators by revealing the...

  7. The Architecture of Keeping Animals: Preservation Responses to Changing Animal Welfare Ideals in Mid-sized American Zoos

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Victoria McCollum

    Beginning in the mid-20th century, most of America’s Zoos began to re-evaluate the spaces which housed their living creatures. As advances in science and technology brought forward new information on animal welfare and care, zoos were soon faced with choices on the treatment of their...

  8. Why the "Visitor Effect" Is Complicated. Unraveling Individual Animal, Visitor Number, and Climatic Influences on Behavior, Space Use and Interactions With Keepers—A Case Study on Captive Hornbills

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Paul E. Rose, Jake S. Scales, James E. Brereton

    A “visitor effect” on zoo-housed species has been documented since the 1970s, with research focused on mammals (specifically primates). To broaden our understanding of the “visitor effect” in a non-mammal, we conducted a case study on a pair of hornbills, recording...

  9. Preparing The Yucatan Black Howler Monkey for Its Return to The Wild: An Assessment of Wildtracks' Approach to Rehabilitation and Reintroduction

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Blanca Ponce

    Nearly half of non-human primates are in danger of extinction due to the negative impact of anthropogenic activities. Among the species most negatively affected is the family Atelidae (Di Fiore, Link, & Campbell, 2011). For this reason, non-human primates remain a central focus in global...

  10. Social Interactions in Zoo-Housed Elephants: Factors Affecting Social Relationships

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ellen Williams, Anne Carter, Carol Hall, Samantha Bremner-Harrison

    Elephants have complex social systems that are predominantly driven by ecological factors in situ. Within zoos, elephants are held in relatively static social groups and the factors observed driving social relationships in the wild are largely absent. Little research has investigated the effect...

  11. Evaluating Trophic Rewilding as a Conservation Technique

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Aaron Sieve

    The focus for this paper is to define specifically trophic rewilding, determine its efficacy as a conservation technique, and explore ways to lessen one of its key limitations. Trophic rewilding is the conservation technique whereby an extirpated keystone species or ecosystem engineer is...

  12. A zoo animal's neighbourhood: how conspecific neighbours impact welfare

    | Contributor(s):: Whitham, J. C., Miller, L. J.

  13. Efficacy of an interactive apparatus as environmental enrichment for common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

    | Contributor(s):: Lauderdale, L. K., Miller, L. J.

  14. Relationship between behavioural diversity and faecal glucocorticoid metabolites: a case study with cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus)

    | Contributor(s):: Miller, L. J., Pisacane, C. B., Vicino, G. A.

  15. Behavioral Research on Captive Animals: Scientific and Ethical Concerns

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kimberley Jayne, Adam See

    The first half of this chapter focuses exclusively on animals that are used in laboratory behavioral research to model wild behavior, what is typically involved, problems associated with this practice, and how behavioral research has revealed scientific problems in the animal model. The second...

  16. The Effectiveness Of Visits To Dickerson Park Zoo On Guests' Conservation Mindedness And Behavior

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sarah K. Foster

    Today, there are more than 10,000 zoos worldwide that provide the public with opportunities to observe and learn about endangered and threatened species from ecosystems all over the world. Through direct and emotional interactions with wildlife at zoos, more than 600 million guests a year have...

  17. A Protocol for the Ethical Assessment of Wild Animal–Visitor Interactions (AVIP) Evaluating Animal Welfare, Education, and Conservation Outcomes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Barbara de Mori, Linda Ferrante, Daniela Florio, Elisabetta Macchi, Ilaria Pollastri, Simona Normando

    Due to the popularity of wild animal–visitor interactions (AVIs), there is a need for an ethical assessment of their impact on animal welfare, education, and conservation. The protocol presented in this study is designed to evaluate such interactions on an integrated level, using a...

  18. Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) Vigilance Behaviour Varies between Human-Modified and Natural Environments

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Georgina Hume, Elizabeth Brunton, Scott Burnett

    Rapid increases in urban land use extent across the globe are creating challenges for many wildlife species. Urban landscapes present a novel environment for many species, yet our understanding of wildlife behavioural adaptations to urban environments is still poor. This study compared the...

  19. Potential Impact of Construction Noise on Selected Zoo Animals

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Richard Jakob-Hoff, Michael Kingan, Chiaki Fenemore, Gian Schmid, John F. Cockrem, Amanda Crackle, Emily Van Bemmel, Rebecca Connor, Kris Descovich

    In anticipation of a major construction project in an urban New Zealand zoo, a study was initiated to assess the response to construction noise of selected animal species (elephant, giraffe, emu and alligator) previously observed to be sensitive to this kind of noise. The overall aim was to...

  20. Captive Wildlife at a Crossroads – Sanctuaries, Accreditation, and Humane-Washing

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Delcianna J. Winders

    We are living through a pivotal moment for captive wild animals in the United States, with increased attention to their wellbeing and major changes by businesses as a result. At the same time, a desire to get up close with wild animals persists and may even be on the rise. These two concurrent...