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  1. Centre for Public Health and Zoonoses: Partnerships & Collaborations

    Contributor(s):: J. Sargeant, A. Whiteman, M. Pham

    The Centre for Public Health and Zoonoses (CPHAZ) mandate is to provide focus and leadership for research, education, and knowledge dissemination in public health at the human-animal-environment interface. This poster focuses on the collaborations of OVC members with external...

  2. What Could Your Dog Be Carrying? - Zoonotic Enteric Bacteria in Pet Dogs in Ontario: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Antimicrobial Resistance

    Contributor(s):: Erin Kathleen Leonard

    In this study we investigated the prevalence of selected zoonotic pathogens (Salmonella and Campylobacter) and antimicrobial resistant bacteria (Salmonella spp. and generic Escherichia coli) in client-owned dogs in Southwestern Ontario. The pet-related risk factors for shedding Salmonella spp.,...

  3. A Walk in the Park: Zoonotic Risks Associated with Dogs that Frequent Dog Parks in Southern Ontario

    Contributor(s):: Theresa D. Procter

    A cross-sectional study investigated the shedding of zoonotic organisms (Campylobacter, Giardia, and Salmonella) and antimicrobial resistant generic E. coli in dogs that visited dog parks in southern Ontario. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify risk factors. Factors for the...

  4. Pets as a Source of Zoonotic Disease: An Investigation into Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Related to Pet Contact and associated Zoonoses in Low and High Disease-risk Households

    Contributor(s):: Jason Stull

    The mental and physical benefits of pet ownership are well established; however, pets can also transmit pathogens to people, with children, elderly, pregnant and immunocompromised individuals at greatest risk of disease. Little is known about the public’s knowledge and practices related to...

  5. Producer Perceptions of Food-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases: Sheep and Goats

    Contributor(s):: Paula Menzies

    Work with the community and producers to understand perceptions of food-borne and zoonotic disease issues in the industry. Use this research to develop preferred knowledge translation methods to address needs and concerns.

  6. Apr 02 2016

    Zoobiquity 6 Conference

    Zoobiquity springs from a simple but revelatory fact: Animals and humans get the same diseases, yet physicians and veterinarians rarely consult with one another. Zoobiquity explores how human and...

    https://habricentral.org/events/details/452

  7. Zoonoses summary report UK 2014

    This report provides summary data on zoonotic infections in animals and humans across the UK in 2014. Zoonoses are diseases which can be transmitted to humans from animals.

  8. Zoonotic Diseases - Fostering Awareness in Critical Audiences

    Contributor(s):: David Benham, Paul S. Morley

    Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases that are shared between humans and other vertebrate animals. Extension professionals often serve as consultants and educators to individuals at high risk of zoonotic diseases, such as participants in 4-H livestock projects. Effective education about...

  9. Zoonotic poxviruses associated with companion animals

    Contributor(s):: Tack, D. M., Reynolds, M. G.

    Understanding the zoonotic risk posed by poxviruses in companion animals is important for protecting both human and animal health. The outbreak of monkeypox in the United States, as well as current reports of cowpox in Europe, point to the fact that companion animals are increasingly serving as...

  10. Review of the risks of some canine zoonoses from free-roaming dogs in the post-disaster setting of Latin America

    Contributor(s):: Garde, E., Acosta-Jamett, G., Bronsvoort, B. M.

    In the absence of humane and sustainable control strategies for free-roaming dogs (FRD) and the lack of effective disaster preparedness planning in developing regions of the world, the occurrence of canine zoonoses is a potentially important yet unrecognized issue. The existence of large...

  11. Emerging and re-emerging zoonoses of dogs and cats

    Contributor(s):: Chomel, B. B.

    Since the middle of the 20th century, pets are more frequently considered as "family members" within households. However, cats and dogs still can be a source of human infection by various zoonotic pathogens. Among emerging or re-emerging zoonoses, viral diseases, such as rabies (mainly from dog...

  12. Mar 17 2016

    Institute of Zoology: One Health for the real World- zoonoses, ecosystems, and wellbeing

    This symposium will bring together leading experts from different fields to discuss the topic 'Healthy ecosystems, healthy people'.Ecosystems provide services that maintain and improve...

    https://habricentral.org/events/details/416

  13. Do animals help people in hospitals? [News]

    Contributor(s):: Jackson, A.

  14. One Health Sweden

    One Health Sweden is a collaboration for researchers with interest in zoonotic infections and antibiotic resistance. One Health Sweden is an integration concept including several universities and governmental organizations that wish to contribute to a sustainable intellectual platform where...

  15. Anthropomorphism to Zoonoses: Two Inevitable Consequences of Human-Animal Relationships

    Contributor(s):: Byron Breedlove, Paul M. Arguin

    Many tales portray animals that mimic human behavior and characteristics by conversing, walking erectly, dressing in clothing, and inhabiting houses. Across myriad cultures and throughout history, stories and myths that feature anthropomorphism have helped us understand and relate to the natural...

  16. Case-Control Study of Risk Factors for Human Infection with a New Zoonotic Paramyxovirus, Nipah Virus during a 1998-1999 Outbreak of Severe Encephalitis in Malaysia

    Contributor(s):: Flora Ong, Lye Munn Sunn, Anthony W. Mounts, Mohamad Taha Arif, Thomas G Ksiazek, Umesh D. Parashar, Muhammad A. Kamaluddin, Amal N. Mustafa, Hanjeet Kaur, Lay Ming Ding, Ghazali Othman, Hayati M. Radzi, Paul T. Kitsutani, Patrick C. Stockton, John Arokiasamy, Howard E. Gary Jr, Larry J. Anderson

    An outbreak of encephalitis affecting 265 patients (105 fatally) occurred during 1998–1999 in Malaysia and was linked to a new paramyxovirus, Nipah, that infected pigs, humans, dogs, and cats. Most patients were pig farmers. Clinically undetected Nipah infection was noted in 10 (6%) of 166...

  17. Wildlife as Source of Zoonotic Infections

    Contributor(s):: Hilde Kruse, Anne-Mette Kirkemo, Kjell Handeland

    Zoonoses with a wildlife reservoir represent a major public health problem, affecting all continents. Hundreds of pathogens and many different transmission modes are involved, and many factors influence the epidemiology of the various zoonoses. The importance and recognition of wildlife as a...

  18. One Health

    The One Health concept recognizes that the health of humans is connected to the health of animals and the environment.CDC uses a One Health approach by working with physicians, ecologists, and veterinarians to monitor and control public health threats. We do this by learning about how diseases...

  19. War of the Worlds: Our worlds are colliding and infectious disease is winning-emerging diseases and the one health initiative

    Contributor(s):: Richard French

    Quoting the U.S. Surgeon General (1968), it is time to “close the book” on infectious diseases and shift public health resources to address chronic diseases. But our public health leaders can make mistakes. Around the time the Surgeon General was...

  20. Client knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding zoonoses: a metropolitan experience

    Contributor(s):: Steele, S. G., Mor, S. M.